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What Happens In Type 2 Diabetes Video

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

It’s possible to simply reverse type 2 diabetes. There are only two things you need to do. By reading this brief post you’ll know what they are, and how to get started. Or skip ahead to the two steps right away > Quick start Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I can write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, coming up) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is the quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A fully reversible disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing thi Continue reading >>

The Basics & Beyond: A Video Library For People With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The Basics & Beyond: A Video Library For People With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

BASICS & BEYOND: TCOYD'S EVER EVOLVING VIDEO RESOURCE LIBRARY Choose from Five Unique Areas of Diabetes Education & Info Its all about the basics! Creating a strong foundation of education will help you with the ins & outs of managing your diabetes every day in any situation. Here we touch on topics like, what to do if youre scared about hypoglycemia, whats an A1c and why is it important and what tests you need on a regular basis to stay healthy. Lets be honest, managing your diabetes 24/7 can do a number on your mood & emotions. Here we offer some sound advice, tips, and tricks for what to do when youve reached a state of diabetes burnout. Weve all been there at some point heres some advice on ways to cope. Eating right & getting your steps in can be one heck of a challenge even when you dont have diabetes. Well give you some tangible and easy to implement advice on how to make small changes that will end up making a big difference. Enjoy a curated collection of specific type 1 education & management strategies. Here we cover type 1 topics ranging from what causes type 1 diabetes, to how to keep your CGM in place and how to treat nighttime lows. With a wide variety of topics, were pretty convinced that youll learn something new. From debunking myths around sugar-free candy, to what exactly is type 2 diabetes, this video series will offer you a quick and easy to understand education on important type 2 specific topics. Thriving and living a happy and healthy life with your diabetes is totally possible. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

Type 2 diabetes is more common in people who don't do enough physical activity, and who are overweight or obese. Type 2 diabetes can often be prevented or delayed with early lifestyle changes, however there is no cure. Common symptoms include being more thirsty than usual, passing more urine, feeling tired and lethargic, slow-healing wounds, itching and skin infections and blurred vision. People with pre-diabetes can reduce their risk of developing diabetes by increasing their physical activity, eating healthily and losing weight (if they are overweight). On this page: Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. The body uses glucose as its main source of energy. Glucose comes from foods that contain carbohydrates, such as potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, fruit and milk. After food is digested, the glucose is released and absorbed into the bloodstream. The glucose in the bloodstream needs to move into body tissues so that cells can use it for energy. Excess glucose is stored in the liver, or converted to fat and stored in other body tissues. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, which is a gland located just below the stomach. Insulin opens the doors (the glucose channels) that let glucose move from the blood into the body cells. It also allows glucose to be stored in the liver and other tissues. This is part of a process known as glucose metabolism. There are two main types of diabetes – type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the body's immune cells attack the insulin-producing cells. As a result, people with type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin and need insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and affects 85 to 90 per cent of all people with diabet Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Video: Manage Your Blood Sugar

Type 2 Diabetes Video: Manage Your Blood Sugar

SPEAKER: To avoid complications from type 2 diabetes, you can take steps to keep your blood sugar levels within a normal range. You'll need to check your sugar-- called "glucose"-- regularly, eat healthy foods, lose weight if you need to, get regular exercise, and take medications if your doctor prescribes them. You'll use a monitor called a "glucometer" to check your blood sugar levels often. First, you prick your finger with a small needle called a "lancet" and place a drop of blood on a strip of paper in the glucometer. Based on what the monitor tells you, you may need to adjust your meals, exercise, or medication dose. Eating a healthy diet helps lower your blood sugar, and that means eating lots of fruits and vegetables along with whole grains and lean protein-- like fish or chicken. You'll want to eat the right kind of carbs and stay away from high-sugar foods. Having meals and snacks about the same time every day helps, too. Getting regular exercise, even just walking 30 minutes a day, will lower your blood glucose levels and help your body use insulin better. You may need to take one or more medications to help lower your blood sugar. Some of these drugs help the pancreas make more insulin while others help your body use the insulin it makes. And some reduce the amount of glucose in your body. If diet, exercise, and these medications aren't enough to control your blood sugar levels, your doctor may prescribe insulin. You'll learn how to inject it-- just under your skin. By keeping your blood sugar in check, you can prevent the complications of type 2 diabetes and live a healthy life. Continue reading >>

The Two Big Lies Of Type 2 Diabetes – Video Lecture

The Two Big Lies Of Type 2 Diabetes – Video Lecture

At the Intensive Dietary Management Clinic we treat many people with type 2 diabetes. Patients often come to our clinic with two ‘facts’ established in their minds. The first is that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. They are often told that they will have the disease for the rest of their lives and they should get used to it. Actually, it is not true at all. Type 2 diabetes is an entirely curable disease. However, taking medications will not cure the disease. Only dietary management has a hope of reversing diabetes. The other big lie in the treatment of type 2 diabetes is that ‘it is all about controlling blood sugar’. Actually, it makes virtually no difference at all. The disease of type 2 diabetes is excessive insulin resistance. It is this insulin resistance that leads to high blood sugars. In order to treat/ cure diabetes, you must reverse the insulin resistance. The high blood sugar is only the symptom, not the disease. Therefore, treating the symptom alone is useless. Imagine that you have a life threatening infection. The infection causes a high fever. But instead of treating the infection with antibiotics, you treat the symptom of fever with Tylenol. It is not useful. You must treat the disease and not the symptom. The same is true in type 2 diabetes. This is a disease of too much insulin resistance resistance. Yet we treat the symptom of high blood sugars. Medications don’t even attempt to reverse the underlying insulin resistance. [kad_youtube url=”] Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Personal Story - Watch Webmd Video

Diabetes Type 2 Personal Story - Watch Webmd Video

Narrator: Jeff Howard begins his day like most of us...with coffee and breakfast. But like more and more Americans, there's something he has to check before he can eat-- his blood sugar. Jeff has Type Two diabetes. His body has trouble using insulin, a hormone that controls blood sugar. With the rise of obesity in America, Type Two diabetes is becoming a national epidemic. The CDC says 21 million Americans have it, another 41 million are at risk. Left unchecked, it can be fatal. Managed properly, it can be controlled. Jeff Howard : If a diabetic will learn--if they will just get the right encouragement-- the dietary planning and exercise program that they have may very well cause them to live longer and healthier lives than they would have if they'd never had diabetes. Narrator: Jeff was diagnosed at age 40. But instead of focusing on his disease, he ignored it. After all, he didn't feel sick... Jeff Howard : I tended to think I was bullet proof and invisible and those people who had complications from diabetes were somebody else. Narrator: Over the last twenty years, Jeff has watched his body slowly disintegrate. Circulatory problems have cost him part of his vision, and caused nerve and bony damage to his left foot... Narrator: And he's concerned about his heartmore than two thirds of people with diabetes die of heart disease or stroke. Jeff Howard : It is an insidious disease that quietly consumes the human body to the point where you can't walk, can't see, can't function and ultimately can't live. So pay attention. Learn everything you can. Get some help and some support. But do it early on when you first discover you're a diabetic, before the damage insidiously takes over and it gets to the point where it's too late. Narrator: Jeff hopes it is not too late. Learn Continue reading >>

Pathophysiology - Type Ii Diabetes

Pathophysiology - Type Ii Diabetes

- Diabetes Mellitus is a group of disorders that's caused by improper function of insulin, which is a hormone produced by the pancreas. And insulin is responsible for helping regulate blood sugar, or glucose levels, in the blood. Now since it's a group of diseases, there are actually multiple different underlying causes of diabetes mellitus. And one of these causes is known as Type 2 Diabetes. Now, before we dive into the actual cause of Type 2 Diabetes, let's first get a better understanding of how exactly insulin works. And there are two major steps. So, imagine that you just ate a big meal. Maybe like a bowl of pasta or something. And your body is currently absorbing all of those nutrients from your digestive system into your bloodstream. Now one of these nutrients is glucose, and as your body absorbs it, that glucose starts building up in the blood stream. And in this feeding or absorptive state, your body wants to store this glucose in places like the liver and muscle cells so that it can be used for energy later when the body needs it. But unfortunately, glucose on its own can't get into these cells. In a sense, these cells are locked. But fortunately, the pancreas is able to help with this problem. So there are a couple types of cells in the pancreas that sense blood sugar levels. And these cells are located in the islets of Langerhans. And these green cells here in the islets of Langerhans are meant to represent the Beta cells. And when the blood glucose increases, the Beta cells of the pancreas sense this change, and they secrete a hormone known as insulin into the blood. And what insulin does is it acts like a key that can unlock these cells so that the glucose can be stored in both the liver and the muscle cells. So you can see that there are two steps in ord Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes Videos Of The Year

The Best Diabetes Videos Of The Year

We’ve carefully selected these videos because they’re actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their viewers with personal stories and high-quality information. Nominate your favorite video by emailing us at [email protected]! Diabetes is a chronic disease caused by improper insulin function. This leads to overly high blood sugar. The three types of diabetes include type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. Prediabetes, where blood sugar is high but not over the diabetic threshold, increases your risk for type 2 diabetes. People of all ages, ethnicities and sizes can get diabetes. Nearly 50 percent of U.S. adults have diabetes or prediabetes, according to a 2015 study. This includes people living with diabetes who haven’t yet received an official diagnosis. Receiving a diabetes diagnosis can feel shocking or overwhelming. The illness has some serious potential complications, such as blindness and amputation. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Treatment often requires immediate and significant lifestyle adjustments. However, with careful management, you can still enjoy a varied diet and active lifestyle. There are plenty of people out there who refuse to let diabetes stop them from thriving. If you’re seeking some inspiration or information, look no further than these videos. 7 Best Superfoods for Diabetes - Saturday Strategy A healthy diet plays a huge role in managing diabetes. Drew Canole, CEO of fitlife.tv, shares insights into superfoods that help keep diabetes in check. Canole says these superfoods will help you regulate glucose levels and lower insulin levels. One such superfood is the Moringa leaf. He says studies have indicated it lowers blood sugar levels by up to 29 percent. Why not give his diabetes-bu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Personal Story - Watch Webmd Video

Diabetes Type 2 Personal Story - Watch Webmd Video

: Hey, my name is Aaron. Aaron, I'm Jeff Howard, nice to meet you. Narrator: Diagnosed with Type Two Diabetes twenty years ago, Jeff Howard is finally managing his disease successfully. Jeff Howard: I'm making lots of changes in my life now. Unfortunately I waited too late to stop the long term damage done to my body as a result of the disease. Narrator: He has fatigue, failing vision, and circulatory problems. A recent infection resulted in amputation of his middle toe. Jeff Howard: For many diabetics it's the beginning of a trend. A little bit of your body amputated here, a little more later, a little more later. Narrator: Determined not to let that happen, Jeff is making some aggressive changes. He is consulting a physical therapist to strengthen his foot muscles and improve his gait so he can successfully exercise. : I think I'll have the the salmon salad. Narrator: He's lost twenty pounds on a healthy new diet. Along with exercise, weight control is a must for diabetics. Being raised on rich Southern cooking, that's something that doesn't come easy for Jeff. Jeff Howard: It is an insidious disease, which quietly consumes. Narrator: Jeff also tries to get enough rest and control his stress. Research shows stress can make blood sugars rise. And he'd like to make sure that others newly diagnosed hear his story and heed this advice. Jeff Howard: Your life must change. It's going to whether you want it to or not. You can either fight the change and suffer the long term consequences and sometimes the short term consequences, or you can be a part of the change and aggressively and positively pursue those changes in lifestyle, which will prolong your life and health. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

The pediatric diabetes and endocrinology staff at American Family Children's Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin, provides comprehensive care for children with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Topics: Video Health Facts for You Clinic Resources Internet Resources Continue reading >>

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes occurs when your pancreas does not produce enough insulin and your body is resistant to the insulin that is produced. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body use blood sugar (known as glucose) for energy. Your body takes the food you eat and breaks down fat, protein, and carbohydrates for energy. During the digestion process, the carbohydrates from your food are broken down into glucose. Glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream where it is carried to cells throughout your body. A healthy pancreas releases a regular supply of insulin into your bloodstream. After you eat, your blood glucose levels rise, and your pancreas responds by releasing more insulin to move the glucose into your cells. Insulin acts as a key, opening up the cell so it can accept the glucose. In a person with Type 2 diabetes, your insulin receptors are less sensitive. Though your pancreas continues to produce some insulin, it is not enough to meet your body's needs. When your body's cells are less responsive to insulin, it is more difficult for glucose to enter the cells and raise your blood glucose level. As a person with Type 2 diabetes, it is important to monitor and maintain healthy blood glucose levels. Over a long period of time, high blood glucose levels can lead to serious health complications, such as heart attack and stroke, blindness, kidney failure, and nerve damage. By getting daily physical activity, eating a healthy diet, and taking your prescribed medication, you will decrease your chances of developing complications from diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, you may be able to delay or prevent developing it by making some lifestyle changes. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include Being very thirsty Urinating often Feeling very hungry or tired Losing weight without trying Having sores that heal slowly Having blurry eyesight Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

What Causes Insulin Resistance?

What Causes Insulin Resistance?

Michael: You wrote: ” Part of the question in my mind are the relative benefits of higher HDL vs lower LDL; a topic I would love to see taken up on a NF video.” I have suggested that this be a topic of future videos. In the meantime, below is some information I’ve gathered about HDL which may be helpful to you. . **************** I am not an expert on the topic of HDL, but some of my favorite NutritionFacts forum members and some experts have had a thing or two to say on the matter. BOTTOM LINE: I synthesize the information below to mean we do not need to worry about HDL levels or HDL falling in the context of a whole plant food based diet, when LDL goes down or is already at a healthy level. . In other words, if you have high/unsafe cholesterol levels (total and LDL) overall, then also having high HDL can be protective (especially if you got that high HDL through exercise or some other healthy behavior rather than diet). But in the face of healthy LDL levels, the HDL level doesn’t seem to matter. I may be wrong about this, but see what you think. ************************************ . First, check out the following article from heart health expert Dean Ornish. He does a great job of explaining the role of HDL and when we need to worry about it’s levels vs when we do not. “A low HDL in the context of a healthy low-fat diet has a very different prognostic significance than a low HDL in someone eating a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet.” . Two of our more knowledgable forum particpants, Gatherer and Darryl, have put together for us some of the strongest evidence–a list of good studies. Gatherer wrote (from comment ) : . “”Don’t put too much stock in HDL levels. Here is a news release “Raising ‘good’ cholesterol doesn’t protect against heart di Continue reading >>

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a common metabolic condition that develops when the body fails to produce enough insulin or when insulin fails to work properly, which is referred to as insulin resistance. Insulin is the hormone that stimulates cells to uptake glucose from the blood to use for energy. When this is the case, cells are not instructed by insulin to take up glucose from the blood, meaning the blood sugar level rises (referred to as hyperglycemia). People usually develop type 2 diabetes after the age of 40 years, although people of South Asian origin are at an increased risk of the condition and may develop diabetes from the age of 25 onwards. The condition is also becoming increasingly common among children and adolescents across all populations. Type 2 diabetes often develops as a result of overweight, obesity and lack of physical activity and diabetes prevalence is on the rise worldwide as these problems become more widespread. Type 2 diabetes accounts for approximately 90% of all diabetes cases (the other form being type 1 diabetes) and treatment approaches include lifestyle changes and the use of medication. Types of Diabetes Also known of as juvenile diabetes, type 1 diabetes usually occurs in childhood or adolescence. In type 1 diabetes, the body fails to produce insulin. Patients have to be given the hormone, which is why the condition is also known of as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Type 2 diabetes mellitus is also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), since it can be treated with lifestyle changes and/or types of medication other than insulin therapy. Type 2 diabetes is significantly more common than type 1 diabetes. Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes The increased blood glucose level seen in diabetes can eventually damage a person’s Continue reading >>

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