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What Happened To Diabetes America

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is The Average Age Of Onset?

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is The Average Age Of Onset?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes. The variations between individual diagnoses are too great for there to be an exact age of onset for type 2 diabetes. There is evidence, however, that the likelihood of developing the condition increases drastically after the age of 45. Average age of onset for type 2 diabetes The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend annual diabetes screening tests after the age of 45. But the age at which someone develops the condition depends on too many differing factors to accurately predict. A wide mix of individual health and lifestyle factors can influence the progression of the condition. Many people have diabetes for years before being diagnosed, causing a large variation between the age of onset and age of diagnosis. Meanwhile, some estimates claim that nearly one-third of those with diabetes do not know they have it, which further complicates estimates. And many national surveys and studies do not distinguish between rates of type 1 and 2 diabetes in adults. According to the CDC, from 1997 through to 2011, the average age at which a person was diagnosed with diabetes in the United States was largely the same, at around 54 years of age. While there might not be a set age for onset for type 2 diabetes, age greatly increases the chances of developing the condition. In 2014, an estimated 4.3 percent of Americans over 20 years of age had diabetes, while 13.4 percent of those aged 45-64, and 11.2 percent of those aged 65 or older, had the condition. A 2016 study found that the rates of type 2 diabetes were up to seven times higher in Chinese adults, aged 55-74, than they were in those aged 20-34 years. The ADA report that rates of diabetes remain high i Continue reading >>

Closure Of Texas Diabetes Centers Catches Some Patients, Staff Off Guard

Closure Of Texas Diabetes Centers Catches Some Patients, Staff Off Guard

A network of diabetes care centers with roots in Houston and locations in about a dozen cities in Texas, including Arlington, Plano and Las Colinas, will permanently close on Friday. Diabetes America posted a note on its website about a month ago. Patients and staff described the announcement as “sudden” and “surprising.” The closures, with little explanation, left thousands of patients in search of new diabetes care providers. Doctors, nutritionists and other specialists at the centers had to move quickly to find new jobs. The Las Colinas, Pearland and Central San Antonio locations will close at the end of business Friday. Nine other locations shuttered in early April. According to the Texas Administrative Code, when a physician's office closes, signage must be posted at least 30 days prior. The provider must ensure patients receive “reasonable notification” and have the opportunity to obtain or transfer their medical records. Diabetes America was founded in Houston in 2004 as The Diabetes Centers of America Inc. The name changed in 2007. The facilities were touted as a “one-stop-shop,” where patients with diabetes could access specialized clinicians, order lab work and learn about nutrition. The company grew quickly to 17 clinics in Texas and one in Arizona by 2008. It generated average monthly revenue of almost $1.3 million by 2010 and saw an estimated 51,000 patient visits a year, according to court documents. But the for-profit provider soon saw financial woes. The company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2012. In its filing, it cited long leases that prevented it from closing poor performing centers and billing issues with government and commercial insurers. Similar issues are being faced by Lewisville-based Adeptus, the nation’s largest operat Continue reading >>

Why Are More American Kids Getting Type 2 Diabetes — And What Can We Do About It?

Why Are More American Kids Getting Type 2 Diabetes — And What Can We Do About It?

Type 2 diabetes, once considered solely an adult disease, affects an increasing number of children under the age of 18. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas gradually loses its ability to produce enough insulin to control a person’s blood sugar levels. People with diabetes may develop serious complications, such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, and premature death. According to SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth, a multicenter study funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health, during 2008 and 2009 an estimated 18,436 people younger than 20 in the United States were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year. Also, 5,089 people younger than 20 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes each year. The study cited obesity, exposure to diabetes in-utero, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals in common household products as possible causes of the rise in type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes disproportionately affects minority groups. According to the CDC, the incidence of type 2 diabetes among those 10 to 19 years old is highest among American Indians, followed by African Americans, Hispanics, and Asian or Pacific Islanders. It is lowest among non-Hispanic whites. Today is World Diabetes Day, and Healthline sat down with two pediatricians to find out why more children are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and what can be done to keep kids from getting the disease. Check Out the Year’s Best Diabetes Apps » More Young Children Now Diagnosed with Adult Diseases Dr. Angela Lennon, a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of Kansas Hospital, told Healthline that she sees obese children 12 to 14 years old with kidney problems, heart problems, and high blood pressure. “A lot of the complications start 10 years after getting d Continue reading >>

Diabetes America, Inc.: Private Company Information - Bloomberg

Diabetes America, Inc.: Private Company Information - Bloomberg

Diabetes America, Inc. operates a network of diabetes care centers in Texas. It provides specialized diabetes medical care, personalized diabetes education, nutrition coaching/weight management, lifestyle instruction and exercise, and labs and diagnostic testing services to patients; and employer/health plans. The company also offers a DietIQ, a weight management program. Diabetes America, Inc. was formerly known as Diabetes Centers of America, Inc. and changed its name to Diabetes America, Inc. in June 2004. The company was founded in 2004 and is based in Houston, Texas. It has locations in Houston, Humble, Katy, Pasadena, Pearland, Sugar Land, Shenandoah, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Arlington, Irvin... Diabetes America, Inc. operates a network of diabetes care centers in Texas. It provides specialized diabetes medical care, personalized diabetes education, nutrition coaching/weight management, lifestyle instruction and exercise, and labs and diagnostic testing services to patients; and employer/health plans. The company also offers a DietIQ, a weight management program. Diabetes America, Inc. was formerly known as Diabetes Centers of America, Inc. and changed its name to Diabetes America, Inc. in June 2004. The company was founded in 2004 and is based in Houston, Texas. It has locations in Houston, Humble, Katy, Pasadena, Pearland, Sugar Land, Shenandoah, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Arlington, Irving, Plano, and San Antonio, Texas. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information

Diabetes Information

Almost 30 million people in the United States have diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form of the disease, usually occurs in people who are 45 years of age or older. However, the rate of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents is increasing. Common Diabetes Terms (American Diabetes Association) Diabetes Can Be Silent | Definition of Diabetes | Warning Signs of Diabetes | Type 1 Diabetes | Type 2 Diabetes | Gestational Diabetes | Complications of Diabetes Diabetes can go silently undetected for a long time without symptoms. Many people first become aware that they have diabetes when they develop one of its potentially life-threatening complications, such as heart disease, blindness or nerve disease. Fortunately, diabetes can be managed with proper care. Diabetes is a chronic (life-long) condition that can have serious consequences. However, with careful attention to your blood sugar control, lifestyle modifications and medications, you can manage your diabetes and may avoid many of the problems associated with the disease. The Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) can help you make the transition of managing your disease easier. Back to top Definition of Diabetes Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. The cause of diabetes is a mystery, although both genetics and environmental factors such as obesity and lack of exercise appear to play roles. There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 Type 2 Gestational Diabetes Back to top Warning Signs of Diabetes Frequent urination Unusual thirst Extreme hunger Continue reading >>

Popular Diabetes Medication Linked To Kidney Failure Americas Lawyer

Popular Diabetes Medication Linked To Kidney Failure Americas Lawyer

Popular Diabetes Medication Linked to Kidney Failure Americas Lawyer According to latest data from the Centers for Disease Control, more than 29-million Americans suffer from diabetes, and nearly one of four people with the disease arent even aware that they have it. Even worse, as many as 86-million Americans currently suffer from pre-diabetes, and if preemptive measures arent taken they too will be diagnosed with full blown diabetes in a matter of years. With so many people suffering from both type one and type two diabetes, Big Pharma saw an opportunity to make a huge profit. In the rush to cash in on the diabetic epidemic they cut corners. They created a product thats causing as much harm, if not more, than the actual disease itself. That product is called Invokana. Papantonio: According to latest data from the Centers for Disease Control, more than 29-million Americans suffer from diabetes, and nearly one of four people with the disease arent even aware that they have it. Even worse, as many as 86-million Americans currently suffer from pre-diabetes, and if preemptive measures arent taken they too will be diagnosed with full blown diabetes in a matter of years. With so many people suffering from both type one and type two diabetes, Big Pharma saw an opportunity to make a huge profit. In the rush to cash in on the diabetic epidemic they cut corners. They created a product thats causing as much harm, if not more, than the actual disease itself. That product is called Invokana. Invokana was developed by Janssen, an offshoot of Johnson & Johnson. Unlike other diabetes medications that are designed to help the body produce more insulin to metabolize sugar, Invokana actually forces the body to filter sugar out of the blood by the kidneys and then the sugar is expelled a Continue reading >>

Diabetes 2030: Insights From Yesterday, Today, And Future Trends

Diabetes 2030: Insights From Yesterday, Today, And Future Trends

Diabetes and its complications, deaths, and societal costs have a huge and rapidly growing impact on the United States. Between 1990 and 2010 the number of people living with diabetes tripled and the number of new cases annually (incidence) doubled.1 Adults with diabetes have a 50% higher risk of death from any cause than adults without diabetes, in addition to risk for myriad complications.2 Reducing this burden will require efforts on many fronts—from appropriate medical care to significant public health efforts and individual behavior change across the nation, through state- and community-specific efforts. Public awareness is a key first step. For this purpose, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) releases national diabetes statistics every 2 years, providing a point-in-time picture of diabetes for the country as a whole. However, state and metropolitan diabetes forecasts with projections several years into the future also are useful as health professionals and decision makers contemplate actions to address the diabetes epidemic. Therefore, the Institute for Alternative Futures (IAF) has prepared 2015, 2020, 2025, and 2030 diabetes forecasts for the entire United States, every state, and several metropolitan statistical areas, all of which are easily accessible on the Internet.3 This study shows how past trends, current data, and future projections provide valuable insights about the possible course of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes America In Houston, Tx With Reviews - Yp.com

Diabetes America In Houston, Tx With Reviews - Yp.com

A metabolic disorder is a condition that occurs when the body's metabolic process is disrupted by dysfunctional chemical reactions. Some types of metabolic disorders are inherited, and these are usually caused a defective gene. Metabolic disorders may also be caused by a compromised liver or pancreas. The symptoms of this condition may include seizures, lethargy, weight loss, and jaundice. Diabetes is a disease that affects the body's ability to generate or respond to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that's made by the pancreas, and it impacts your body's ability to properly manage its blood sugar levels. Diabetes can cause sugars to build up in the blood, and this can result in health problems such as heart disease, blindness, and kidney failure. In severe cases, diabetes may lead to amputations of the lower extremities. What type of training does an endocrinologist receive? Endocrinologists are doctors, and they must obtain a medical degree from an accredited medical school and meet certain requirements before beginning work as licensed physicians. An endocrinologist must complete an undergraduate pre-medical degree, four years of medical school, a three-year residency in internal medicine, and two to three years of fellowship training in endocrinology. Part of the endocrine system, the pituitary gland is located at the base of the brain. The pituitary gland weighs about 0.5 grams and is about the size of a pea. It is often known as the body's "master gland" due to its role in overseeing the growth, development, and functioning of the body's other endocrine glands. Osteoporosis is a bone disease in which tissue loss causes bones to become fragile and brittle. With this disease, bones are at a higher risk from damage and breaking. In severe cases of osteoporosis, even a Continue reading >>

Diabetes By The Numbers

Diabetes By The Numbers

Diabetes kills more Americans each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. In the next 24 hours, over 130 people will develop kidney failure because of diabetes. Thats nearly 50,000 friends, neighbors, co-workers or family members every year. Recent estimates project that as many as 1 in 3 American adults will have diabetes by 2050 unless we take steps to Stop Diabetes. Every 19 seconds, someone is diagnosed with diabetes. Thats more than 32,000 friends, neighbors, co-workers and family members in the next 7 days. 1 in 4 adults who has it doesnt know it. 1 in 3 adults is at risk of developing it. In the next 24 hours, over 130 people will develop kidney failure because of diabetes. That's nearly 50,000 friends, neighbors, co-workers or family members every year. In the next 24 hours, 4,660 new cases of diabetes will be diagnosed. Thats more than 3 friends, neighbors, co-workers or family members every minute of every day. Stop Diabetes is the Association's movement to end the devastating toll that diabetes takes on the lives of millions of individuals and families across our nation. Join the Millions in the Movement. Together we can Stop Diabetes. Continue reading >>

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a life-long disease that affects the way your body handles glucose, a kind of sugar, in your blood. Most people with the condition have type 2. There are about 27 million people in the U.S. with it. Another 86 million have prediabetes: Their blood glucose is not normal, but not high enough to be diabetes yet. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. It's what lets your cells turn glucose from the food you eat into energy. People with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but their cells don't use it as well as they should. Doctors call this insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to try to get glucose into the cells. But eventually it can't keep up, and the sugar builds up in your blood instead. Usually a combination of things cause type 2 diabetes, including: Genes. Scientists have found different bits of DNA that affect how your body makes insulin. Extra weight. Being overweight or obese can cause insulin resistance, especially if you carry your extra pounds around the middle. Now type 2 diabetes affects kids and teens as well as adults, mainly because of childhood obesity. Metabolic syndrome. People with insulin resistance often have a group of conditions including high blood glucose, extra fat around the waist, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol and triglycerides. Too much glucose from your liver. When your blood sugar is low, your liver makes and sends out glucose. After you eat, your blood sugar goes up, and usually the liver will slow down and store its glucose for later. But some people's livers don't. They keep cranking out sugar. Bad communication between cells. Sometimes cells send the wrong signals or don't pick up messages correctly. When these problems affect how your cells make and use insulin or glucose, a chain reac Continue reading >>

Denying Health Care To Diabetics Makes Just About Zero Sense

Denying Health Care To Diabetics Makes Just About Zero Sense

Denying Health Care to Diabetics Makes Just About Zero Sense Denying Health Care to Diabetics Makes Just About Zero Sense Denying Health Care to Diabetics Makes Just About Zero Sense Last week, the Trump administration made a new enemy: the American Diabetes Association. During a panel discussion at a forum for health care luminaries at Stanford University on Thursday, Trumps budget director Mick Mulvaney told an audience that the GOP bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act would take care of people with pre-existing conditions, but only to an extent. It doesnt mean we should be required to take care of the person who sits home, drinks sugary drinks, doesnt exercise, eats poorly, and gets diabetes, he said. Diabetes affects nearly 30 million Americans, most of whom did not take kindly to the jab. Almost immediately, they took to Twitter to explain that both kinds of diabetestype 1 and type 2are the result of a both genetic and environmental factors. The ADA backed them up on Friday with a public statement decrying the notion that diabetes is a disease of choice: Mr. Mulvaneys comments perpetuate the stigma that one chooses to have diabetes based on his/her lifestyle. We are also deeply troubled by his assertion that access to health care should be rationed or denied to anyone. Even if you subscribe to the notion that denying people health care is a morally acceptable way to get them to exercise or start eating better, there are still a few big problems with Mulvaneys assertion. The first is an issue of biology: You dont get diabetes by sitting around eating too much sugar. Yes, obesity is the single biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes (the form of the disease where the body is resistant to insulin), but the research shows it takes a combination of factors to develop Continue reading >>

Diabetes America Cypress-fairbanks

Diabetes America Cypress-fairbanks

First, try refreshing the page and clicking Current Location again. Make sure you click Allow or Grant Permissions if your browser asks for your location. If your browser doesn't ask you, try these steps: At the top of your Chrome window, near the web address, click the green lock labeled Secure. In the window that pops up, make sure Location is set to Ask or Allow. You're good to go! Reload this Yelp page and try your search again. If you're still having trouble, check out Google's support page . You can also search near a city, place, or address instead. At the top of your Opera window, near the web address, you should see a gray location pin. Click it. In the window that pops up, click Clear This Setting You're good to go! Reload this Yelp page and try your search again. If you're still having trouble, check out Opera's support page . You can also search near a city, place, or address instead. Click Safari in the Menu Bar at the top of the screen, then Preferences. Under Website use of location services, click Prompt for each website once each day or Prompt for each website one time only. MacOS may now prompt you to enable Location Services. If it does, follow its instructions to enable Location Services for Safari. Close the Privacy menu and refresh the page. Try using Current Location search again. If it works, great! If not, read on for more instructions. Back in the Privacy dialog, Click Manage Website Data... and type yelp.com into the search bar. Click the yelp.com entry and click Remove. You're good to go! Close the Settings tab, reload this Yelp page, and try your search again. If you're still having trouble, check out Safari's support page . You can also search near a city, place, or address instead. At the top of your Firefox window, to the left of the web Continue reading >>

History Of Diabetes

History Of Diabetes

Frederick Banting (right) joined by Charles Best in office, 1924 Diabetes is one of the first diseases described[1] with an Egyptian manuscript from c. 1500 BCE mentioning “too great emptying of the urine.”[2] The first described cases are believed to be of type 1 diabetes.[2] Indian physicians around the same time identified the disease and classified it as madhumeha or honey urine noting that the urine would attract ants.[2] The term "diabetes" or "to pass through" was first used in 250 BC by the Greek Apollonius of Memphis.[2] Type 1 and type 2 diabetes were identified as separate conditions for the first time by the Indian physicians Sushruta and Charaka in 400-500 CE with type 1 associated with youth and type 2 with obesity.[2] The term "mellitus" or "from honey" was added by Thomas Willis in the late 1600s to separate the condition from diabetes insipidus which is also associated with frequent urination.[2] Further history[edit] Plaque in Strasbourg commemorating the 1889 discovery by Minkowski and Von Mering The first complete clinical description of diabetes was given by the Ancient Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia (fl. 1st century CE), who also noted the excessive amount of urine which passed through the kidneys.”[3] Diabetes mellitus appears to have been a death sentence in the ancient era. Hippocrates makes no mention of it, which may indicate that he felt the disease was incurable. Aretaeus did attempt to treat it but could not give a good prognosis; he commented that "life (with diabetes) is short, disgusting and painful."[4] The disease must have been rare during the time of the Roman empire with Galen commenting that he had only seen two cases during his career.[2] In medieval Persia, Avicenna (980–1037) provided a detailed account on diabet Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions globally. Worldwide, the prevalence of chronic, noncommunicable diseases is increasing at an alarming rate. About 18 million people die every year from cardiovascular disease, for which diabetes and hypertension are major predisposing factors. Today, more than 1.7 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese. In addition, at least 155 million children worldwide are overweight or obese. A diabetes epidemic is underway. According to an estimate of International Diabetes Federation comparative prevalence of Diabetes during 2007 is 8.0 % and likely to increase to 7.3% by 2025. Number of people with diabetes is 246 million (with 46% of all those affected in the 40–59 age group) and likely to increase to 380 m by 2025. The comparative prevalence of IGT is 7.5% in 2007 and likely to go up to 6.0 by 2025. The number of people with IGT is 308 million in 2007 and likely to be 418 m by 2025. (1) Almost 80% of the total adult diabetics are in developing countries. The regions with the highest rates are the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, where 9.2 % of the adult population is affected, and North America (8.4%). The highest numbers, however, are found in the Western Pacific, where some 67 million people have Diabetes, followed by Europe with 53 million. India leads the global top ten in terms of the highest number of people with diabetes with a current figure of 40.9 million, followed by China with 39.8 million. Behind them come USA; Russia; Germany; Japan; Pakistan; Brazil; Mexico and Egypt. Two major concerns are that much of this increase in Diabetes will occur in developing countries and that there is a growing incidence of Type 2 Diabetes at a younger age in Continue reading >>

Cholesterol Abnormalities And Diabetes

Cholesterol Abnormalities And Diabetes

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that is made by the body and found in some animal-based foods. Blood cholesterol levels describe a group of fats also known as lipoproteins which includes HDL-C, or "good" cholesterol and LDL-C or "bad" cholesterol . Cholesterol is important to overall health, but when levels are too high, cholesterol can be harmful by contributing to narrowed or blocked arteries. Unfortunately, people with diabetes are more prone to having unhealthy high cholesterol levels, which contributes to cardiovascular disease (CVD). By taking steps to manage cholesterol , individuals can reduce their chance of cardiovascular disease and premature death. Using a blood sample taken after a brief period of fasting by the patient, a lipoprotein profile reveals the following lipid measures: Low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol = "bad" cholesterol A high LDL-C level is associated with a higher risk for CVD. However, your LDL number should no longer be the main factor in guiding treatment to prevent heart attack and stroke, according to the latest guidelines from the American Heart Association. For patients taking statins, its important to work with your doctor to manage your LDL appropriately. A diet high in saturated and trans fats can raise your LDL cholesterol. High-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol = "good" cholesterol With HDL-C, higher levels are associated with a lower risk for CVD. Low HDL cholesterol puts you at higher risk for heart disease. People with high blood triglycerides usually also have lower HDL cholesterol. Genetic factors, type 2 diabetes, and certain drugs, such as beta-blockers and anabolic steroids, also lower HDL cholesterol levels. Smoking, being overweight and being sedentary can all contribute to lower HDL cholesterol. Triglycerid Continue reading >>

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