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What Granola Bars Are Good For Diabetics?

Granola Bars - Diabetes Self-management

Granola Bars - Diabetes Self-management

1 large egg plus 1 egg white, lightly beaten Preheat oven to 350F. Line the bottom and sides of an 8-inch square baking pan with wax paper or parchment paper, leaving a margin of paper along the top edges of the pan. Mix the first five ingredients together. In another bowl, mix the almond extract into the lightly beaten eggs. Pour the egg mixture over the dry ingredients and mix until evenly distributed. Press mixture into the prepared baking pan. Bake for 20 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool pan on a wire rack 5 minutes. Carefully grasp the edges of the wax paper to lift the bars from the pan. Place on a cutting board and cut into 12 bars with a sharp knife. Let cool completely, then store in an airtight container. Yield: 12 bars. Serving size: about 1 ounce. Calories: 80 calories, Carbohydrates: 12 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 2.5 g, Saturated Fat: 0 g, Cholesterol: 15 mg, Sodium: 40 mg, Fiber: 2 g Exchanges per serving: 1 fruit, 1/2 fat. Carbohydrate choices: 1. See more Diabetic Snack and Appetizer Recipes This recipe was created by Sandy Bjerkness, RD, LD, a research dietitian and freelance writer from Rochester, Minnesota. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Top 4 Snack Bars For Diabetes

Top 4 Snack Bars For Diabetes

Snack bars may be convenient, but they also can match up nutritionally to a standard candy bar. With excess sugar, fat, and added ingredients, it's important to read labels and know what kind of bars you are getting. No Idle Snack Bar Eating Make sure you eat them for a reason. For example, pre-workout fuel to prevent low blood sugar, or to tide hunger between meals when you are on-the-go. But, remember that not all bars are created equal—some don't stack up nutritionally to others. I asked my patients and peer Certified Diabetes Educators to tell me their favorite snack bars based on flavor and blood sugar results. Before I reveal the "best picks," here are some basic guidelines and things to think about before buying a snack bar. General Guidelines to Choosing a Healthy Snack Bar There is no real science behind this, rather just trial and error and professional opinion. I tell my patients to aim to keep the counts close to this: Sugar content less than 10 grams (the lower the better) Carbohydrates less than 30 grams (depending on what you are eating it for) Protein at least 5 grams (this will help you to feel full and reduce the likelihood of blood sugar crashes) Fiber at least 3 grams Calories less than 250 If you need a bar that is gluten free, vegan, or nut free make sure you read ingredients carefully Keeping snacks to about 250 calories or less can help to prevent weight gain and keep metabolism revved up. When Should You Eat a Snack Bar? If you are running late to work and need a quick breakfast, a snack bar can be a good choice. To complete the meal, pair it with a low-fat Greek yogurt, a hard-boiled egg or a handful of nuts. Some people benefit from a larger breakfast. Figure out what works best for you. As a snack. The right bar is rich in fiber, protein, a Continue reading >>

How To Eat On The Go When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

How To Eat On The Go When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

Since you have type 2 diabetes, you’ve probably got your carb counting down at home and a good idea of what to eat to keep your blood sugar steady. Picking meals and snacks on the go may seem more random, but there are healthy options in every situation. You just have to know what to look for, wherever you are. At the Drive-Thru “The average fast-food meal can run as high as 1,000 calories -- over half of what you may need for the day -- and also run up your blood sugar,” says Toby Smithson, co-author of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies. “Menu items described as ‘jumbo,’ ‘giant,’ or ‘deluxe’ probably indicate an item that’s as high in sugar and fat as it is in calories.” Your best bet: “A kids’ burger, no cheese, provides a reasonable meal with lower carbs, protein, and fat,” Smithson says. Skip the fries, and go for a side salad, baby carrots, or apple slices instead. In a Sandwich Shop When sandwiches are made to order, you’re able to choose the items you add on, like veggies, and what to leave off, such as fatty mayonnaise or high-sugar barbecue sauce. Plus, many delis offer a combo of half a sandwich with half a salad or a cup of soup, which can be a great way to keep carbs in check, Smithson says. Your best bet: Choose freshly sliced lean meats over deli meats, which tend to have more salt. Turkey and chicken are usually lower in fat and salt, so they’re good bets -- as long as you don’t have them in a heavy mayonnaise-based salad. Choose whole-grain breads and wraps, since they have more nutrients than white bread. But be aware: “That doesn’t always equate to higher fiber or lower carbohydrate,” Smithson says. Generally speaking, a 6-inch tortilla or half a sandwich bun offers 15 grams, or 1 serving, of car Continue reading >>

Cereal Bars

Cereal Bars

Healthy or unhealthy? Accidentally skipping breakfast during the morning rush, grabbing a quick snack on the move, adding something extra to your child’s lunchbox – cereal bars can be a reliable go-to on hectic days. Although often thought of as ahealthy snack option, this is not always the case, with many varieties containing surprisingly high amounts of sugar. With recent targets being slashed, the amount of sugar we’re allowed on a daily basis has also dropped, throwing into question the types of snacks we’re eating and the overall amount ofsugar in our diets. To highlight this, we looked at the sugar content of 10 popular cereal bars commonly found in shops, cafes, our kitchen cupboards and our lunchboxes. Are some brands healthier than others? Just how sugary are these bars? And, most importantly, could some of them be damaging to our health? Cereal bars are often considered to be a 'healthy' snack option. How much sugar is ok? The maximum daily 'free sugar' intake for: children (aged 4 to 7) is 19g, equal to 5 cubes or 5 tsp of sugar children aged (7 to 10) is 24g, equal to 6 cubes or 6 tsp of sugar children (over 11) and adults is 30g, equal to 7 cubes or 7 tsp of sugar Different types of sugar The type of sugar we should all be on the look out for is known asFree sugar is any sugar that’s been added to food or drink products by the manufacturer, cook or consumer – essentially, any sugar that was not already there. It also includes sugars naturally found in honey, syrups and fruit juice. Fruit itself is fine, and the sugar it contains doesn’t count as ‘free sugar’. Ideally, no more than 5% of the energy we consume should come from free sugars. So, how do you know how to spot these pesky free sugars? Even on close inspection of labels and packagi Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

Energy Bars For Diabetics

Energy Bars For Diabetics

Energy bars, in moderation, are great to use as a meal supplement or a workout snack. Many energy bars are not good choices for diabetics because they are packed with sugars, carbohydrates and artificial sweeteners. Selecting these high glycemic products would cause large surges in your blood sugar levels. However, there are a number of energy bars that have low glycemic levels and are made from natural sugar supplements. Video of the Day Granola Gourmet's energy bars are low-glycemic, made with whole ingredients and do not contain dairy or wheat products. These vegan bars contain approximately 10 g of sugar, allowing for a slow increase of blood sugar overtime. They are a great selection for you since they are not high fat, high sodium or high sugar. You can enjoy a variety of flavors, such as ultimate berry, chocolate espresso and brownie by either purchasing them on-line or in your local grocery store. SoLo Energy Bars are low glycemic and are marketed to athletes because of their balance between carbohydrates, proteins, fat and fiber needed for optimal endurance performance. Due to this balanced nutrition, you will not experience energy crashes or feel tired after consuming the product. There are approximately five flavor choices, including berry bliss, lemon lift, and peanut power, that can be purchased on-line or in selected grocery stores. Known as the original energy bar, Power Bar Performance Energy bars contain a 2:1 glucose to fructose balance to enhance your performance levels. They are low in fat and do not contain artificial flavors. According to Powerbar.com, these products provide the appropriate carbohydrate and protein exchanges recommended by the American Diabetic Association. Flavors include vanilla crisp, banana, and oatmeal raisin, and they can be Continue reading >>

Top 4 Best Protein Bars For Diabetics

Top 4 Best Protein Bars For Diabetics

Protein or nutritional bars are often nothing more than a candy bar in disguise, which makes choosing one difficult, let alone for a diabetic. Steering clear of super high carbs, high sugar, and high calories may seem easy enough but one look at some popular bars will show you that you’ll need to do some careful shopping. Bottom Line Up Front: If you are in a rush, my top pick for diabetics is the NuGo Slim protein bars available here. Of course, continue reading for my full take… Protein bars are best used as a snack rather than a meal replacement. There are meal replacement bars available, so be sure to double-check nutritional facts to ensure the bar you are buying is for between meals rather than a substitute for a meal. When shopping for a protein bar as a snack you’ll want to find something with low sugar (10g or less), moderate carbs (30g or less), moderate protein (10g or less), some fiber and a total of 250 calories or less. If you are active and looking for a protein bar because you workout then you’ll probably want higher protein. Keep your own dietary restrictions in mind. For example, avoiding bars with processed sugars or chemicals. Similarly, make sure you are avoiding gluten, soy, dairy, or any other ingredients you are allergic too. With these things in mind, here are the top 4 best protein bars for those with diabetes. NuGo Slim Bars NuGo Nutrition is all about creating protein bars with real ingredients and made for those with dietary restrictions. They use non-GMO, organic ingredients and are also Kosher, gluten free, vegan and diabetic-friendly. Their line of NuGo Slim are especially good for those with diabetes and have been carefully crafted to support a healthy metabolism. Comes in three flavors: Basic Nutritional Facts (based on Brownie Continue reading >>

6 Nutrition Bars That Will Change Your Life

6 Nutrition Bars That Will Change Your Life

WRITTEN BY: Alexi Melvin Note: By providing a place for the community to share real life experiences we hope you find inspiration and new ways of thinking about management. We encourage you to approach these offerings as you would a buffet — review the options, maybe try a few new things and come back for what works best for you. Bon Appetit! Check out our library of resources on Food. With all the various brands and flavors of nutrition bars available today, no one bar is going to taste the same as another. The same goes for the effect that they will have on our bodies (and BG levels!) Need a hearty “meal” bar? A good balance of sugar and protein to correct a low BG? A quick boost at the gym? Maybe a lower carb option? There is truly a bar for every occasion, so here are a few of my favorites to munch on, each with their own unique appeal. 1 – A Healthy Boost RISE Protein Bar: Almond Honey flavor Total Carb: 20g Dietary Fiber: 4g Sugars: 13g Calories: 280 Protein: 20g Total Fat: 16g RISE bars are perfect for if you’re running low and need a healthy balance of sugar and protein. Those 13g of sugar will boost your BG levels quickly, and the 20g of protein will help to keep it there, without any crashes later. These bars are made with minimal ingredients (almonds, honey, and whey protein isolate), they have very low sodium (25g), and are gluten free. Those 280 calories and 16g of “good” fat also make it a good overall “meal” bar if you are on-the-go. 2 – Low in Carbs, High in “Yum!” PowerCrunch Protein Energy Bar: Cookies & Cream flavor Total Carb: 9g Dietary Fiber: 1g Sugars: 5g Calories: 205 Protein: 14g Total Fat: 13g PowerCrunch bars are flakey goodness that have a unique crispy coating that will remind you of a wafer cookie! But with all that Continue reading >>

Product Review: Kind Bars & Gluten-free Granola!

Product Review: Kind Bars & Gluten-free Granola!

Personally, I tend to follow a moderately low-carb nutrition plan, around 70 to 100 grams a day, so things like granola really don’t make it to my list of priorities. I choose my carb-choices very carefully, never wasting a drop of insulin on something I’m not really going to enjoy. Usually, I steer clear of things like granola and granola bars because of the following reasons: They often contain gluten. (I have celiac.) They often contain a ton of sugar. They often contain a total carbohydrates without much else (45+ for granola, 30+ for bars). On their own, they usually offer no protein, so they aren’t a totally well-rounded snack (i.e.: I like protein). I’d seen KIND Bars in the store but grouped them in my head with all other bars. Boy, was I wrong! KIND recently sent me a big variety pack of both their bars and their granola. This is literally the first time I’ve eaten granola in 10 years. I was going to put it in a bowl with milk but ended up eating it like snack food instead. (Another fun fact about the company, is the name KIND is derived from the Dalai Lama quote, “Be KIND whenever possible. It is always possible.”) My discoveries about KIND granola: It’s gluten free & dairy free! It only contains 22 grams of carb (subtract 3 grams of fiber for carb-counting) in a 1/3 cup. While this certainly isn’t “low-carb,” it’s definitely lower than your average granola! A serving only contained 6 grams of added sugar And it was delicious, made with all natural ingredients and no artificial junk! My discoveries about KIND bars: The variety of flavors that these bars come in are too many to list! Even the chocolate drizzled bars come with only 5 grams of sugar. Gluten-free! Some bars contain 7 grams of fiber! Other contain at least 3. All natural ing Continue reading >>

11 Grab-and-go Snacks For Type 2 Diabetes

11 Grab-and-go Snacks For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 12 Snacks for Type 2 Diabetes When a case of the mid-afternoon munchies strikes, it can be tempting to reach for unhealthy snacks like chips, cookies, or a candy bar. But doing so is a surefire way to derail a day of healthy eating. The good news: Snacks don't have to be your diet downfall — they can actually help you stick with your diabetes meal plan as long as you choose wisely, says Laura Cipullo, RD, CDE, author of The Diabetes Comfort Food Diet. Healthy options can curb hunger and provide a boost of energy to get you through your day. The key is to plan ahead and keep the right snacks on hand so you aren't tempted to hit the vending machine. Cipullo usually recommends snacks that contain a mix of carbohydrates, protein, and healthy fats. The winning combination will fill you up and digest slowly in your body, helping to keep your blood sugar levels steady. Read on to discover 12 tasty, on-the-go options that you can stash in your bag or desk drawer so you’ll always have a satisfying snack on standby. Continue reading >>

Healthy… Or Not? Energy Bars

Healthy… Or Not? Energy Bars

We’re fortunate in this country to have so many different types of food available to us. And thousands of new food products are introduced to every year. The downside of that is that many of these new foods aren’t always so healthful — candy, gum, snack foods, and beverages account for most of the newbies that show up in the supermarket. Energy Bars One food product that has really skyrocketed in popularity is the energy bar. Not that long ago, energy bars were seen mostly in health-food stores. Now they’re everywhere, including at your local drugstore. My neighborhood supermarket has shelf after shelf of these bars. As the name implies, energy bars were originally developed to “fuel” athletes, giving them both energy and endurance. Yet, they’ve turned into a convenient snack or even a quick meal on the go for many of us. Americans spend more than one billion dollars on these bars every year. And there are hundreds of these bars to choose from. But what’s in them? Are they really as nutritious as they’re hyped up to be? Energy bars tend to fall into several different categories: high protein, moderate protein, high carbohydrate, meal replacement, weight loss, and even bars especially aimed at women. Names of bars that you may be familiar with include Balance, Clif, Luna, PowerBar, MET-Rx, Larabar, and Atkins Advantage. There are many more to choose from, as well. Some bars promote organic and all-natural ingredients. The name and the packaging can be very deceiving, however. Some of these bars are not a whole lot different than a regular granola bar or even a candy bar that has been fortified with vitamins and minerals. If you check the ingredient list, you may be surprised to find that they contain various types of sugar (including high-fructose corn Continue reading >>

17 Easy, Low Sugar Snacks For Diabetics (perfect For Picky Eaters)

17 Easy, Low Sugar Snacks For Diabetics (perfect For Picky Eaters)

When you have diabetes, finding healthy low-carb snacks can be a real challenge. Which is really too bad, because snacks can be an important part of our overall nutrition, keeping us going between meals. And when it comes to healthy snacks, it’s important to get a good mix of fiber, protein, and carbohydrates without loading up on added sugar. But too many snacks that claim to be “healthy” are actually high in sugar, trans fats, sodium, and calories. And as you’ve probably noticed, plenty of granola bars, energy bars, cereals, juices, and chips are marketed as healthy, but contain a bunch of added ingredients and chemicals that make them anything but. Also, many of the “healthy snacks” that are available at the grocery store are especially bad snack ideas for diabetics because they can skyrocket your blood sugar – plus they leave you feeling hungry again an hour later. According to the American Diabetes Association, healthy snacks for diabetics should include about 10 to 20 grams of carbohydrates, which helps keep blood sugar levels steady throughout the day. If you’re planning to exercise, they recommend bumping it up to about 30 grams of carbohydrates just before working out (1). Looking for some healthy snack ideas for diabetics that are easy to make and delicious? Check out this list, which provides plenty of options. Quick and Easy Snacks for Diabetics 1. Smoky & Spicy Nut, Sesame, and Coconut “Bacon” Bar Nuts This recipe features a variety of nuts and seeds with a smoky twist that’s sure to satisfy. Bursting with plenty of protein, fiber, and healthy fats, this recipe is packed with flavor and will definitely keep you feeling full until your next meal. Find the recipe here: Oh She Glows 2. Banana & Berry Hemp Seed Pudding Creamy, refreshing, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Granola Bar Recipes

Diabetic Granola Bar Recipes

Deliciously simple and healthy all natural granola bars.Submitted by: AHEALTH1 CALORIES: 150.5 | FAT: 9g | PROTEIN: 5.8g | CARBS: 14.2g | FIBER: 1.3g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the HEALTHY GRANOLA BARS Calories This is a healthy tasty Granola barSubmitted by: 7CLAUDIA7 CALORIES: 109.9 | FAT: 1.4g | PROTEIN: 3.7g | CARBS: 22.3g | FIBER: 3.3g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Granola Calories This is the recipe for Granola Bars from Living on a DimeSubmitted by: ALENAORRISON CALORIES: 152 | FAT: 6.5g | PROTEIN: 2g | CARBS: 22.9g | FIBER: 1.1g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Granola Bars Calories Recipe from Averie's blog LoveVeggiesYoga.com Better than store-bought, these granola bars include healthy almonds, whole grain, natural sweeteners and a touch of fruit. Submitted by: BRYNWRITES4FOOD CALORIES: 160.7 | FAT: 6.2g | PROTEIN: 4.4g | CARBS: 24.3g | FIBER: 3g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Homemade Fruit & Nut Granola Bars Calories A no-bake, granola-type, high-protein bar. Delicious!Submitted by: WORDSMITH101 CALORIES: 120.8 | FAT: 4.4g | PROTEIN: 3.1g | CARBS: 20g | FIBER: 1.9g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Peanut Energy Bars Calories Tasty and nutritious granola bars, preservative free and easy to alter to your taste! Submitted by: MEVI_MUH CALORIES: 157 | FAT: 4.9g | PROTEIN: 3g | CARBS: 26.7g | FIBER: 1.6g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Homemade Chocolate Chip Cranberry Granola Bars Calories I fell in love with the Kashi Coco Beach granola last year, but no one is carrying it where I live anymore. It was also pretty expensive for a small package, and had 9 grams of fat per 1/2 cup serving. So this recipe is my attempt to recreate a yummy chocolate coconut granola and knock Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Lunchbox Granola Bars

Lunchbox Granola Bars

Ingredients 2 cups (500 mL) rolled oats 1 cup (250 mL) whole wheat flour 1/2 cup (125 mL) ground flaxseed 1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar 1 tsp (5 mL) ground cinnamon 1 cup (250 mL) raisins, chocolate chips, or your favorite unsweetened dried fruit 1/2 cup (125 mL) sunflower seeds 1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt 1/3 cup (75 mL) honey 1 egg, beaten 1/4 cup (60 mL) canola oil 1/4 cup (60 mL) applesauce 2 tsp (10 mL) vanilla extract Instructions Preheat oven to 350˚F (180˚C). Oil 9 x 13 inch (22 x 33 cm) baking pan. In large bowl, mix together oats, flour, flaxseed, brown sugar, cinnamon, raisins, sunflower seeds, and salt. Make a well in centre; set aside. In small bowl, combine honey, egg, canola oil, applesauce, and vanilla. Add liquid ingredients to well and mix. Pat mixture evenly into a prepared pan. Bake 20 to 25 minutes, until bars begin to turn golden at edges. Cool 5 minutes, then cut into bars while still warm. Do not allow bars to cool completely before cutting or they will be too hard to cut. Notes Calories 150 Total Fat 6 g Saturated Fat 0.5 g Cholesterol 10 mg Sodium 55 mg Carbohydrates 22 g Fiber 3 g Protein 3 g Continue reading >>

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