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What Fruit Is Good For Diabetes Type 2

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Ex-Diabetic Sidebar: When I was diabetic, my doctors and the hospital's dietitian told me that I would have to avoid fruits. I found that kind of strange, especially, since some of my hospital meals included applesauce, tangerine slices and orange juice! Avoiding fruits was difficult for me because I had a "sweet tooth" -- a strong craving for sweets. Being diabetic, my body craved sugar and I loved sweets -- not just fruits -- I loved apple pie, brownies, chocolate chip cookies, and ice cream. During my research, I discovered how to stop the cravings (see below). I also learned that eating some whole fruit can be beneficial, despite the sugar content in most fruits. Why? Because it's better to eat an apple than some cookies or ice cream to satisfy your craving for something sweet! :-) In addition, studies have shown that the nutrients within most fruits (e.g. antioxidants, Vitamin C, fiber, water) can help prevent and reverse the damage to blood vessels and body tissues caused by Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and other similar diseases. The key is to make sure that you follow an effective reverse diabetes nutritional program such as the one defined in the "Death to Diabetes" 10-Step Reverse Diabetes Wellness Program. Most whole fruits are on the moderate to low end of the Glycemic Index (GI), making them a pretty good choice for most people with diabetes. Many fruits are also packed with vitamins A and C, as well as water,fiber and antioxidants (flavonoids) such as catechin, quercetin, and anthocyanidin. Top 10 Fruits | Reverse Diabetes The following is a list of the top 10 fruits that most diabetics can eat because, for most diabetics, these fruits don't cause large or sustained blood glucose spikes. As a result, eating these fruits can help to satisfy your sweet to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

There’s compelling evidence supporting the notion that high-fructose diets are responsible for most chronic disease; insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and obesity in particular Many fruits are very high in fructose, up to 50X the sugar that most of the fruits our ancestors were exposed to due to consistent hybridization over the past century for sweetness Therefore most fruits are best limited or avoided if you have insulin/leptin resistance as determined by struggling with your weight, or, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease or cancer According to a new study, certain kinds of whole fruits—particularly blueberries, grapes, prunes and apples—may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes Consumption of fruit juices, on the other hand, was found to have greater risk. Those who drank one or more servings of fruit juice each day had a 21 percent higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to the others I believe most will benefit from restricting their fructose to 25 grams a day; and as little as 15 grams a day if you’re diabetic or have chronic health issues. This includes fructose from whole fruits By Dr. Mercola You're probably well-familiarized with my controversial stance on fructose. Compelling evidence shows that fructose is, by far, more harmful to your health than other sugars—especially when it's removed from whole fruits and highly processed and genetically modified, such as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in most processed foods. I've also, as a general rule, warned you of eating too much fruit, as many fruits can be quite high in fructose. This has caused some confusion and consternation among many readers, as fruit has long been promoted as an important part of a healthy diet. That said, there are considerations to take into account when it comes to Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

Best Fruit For Diabetes Type 2

Best Fruit For Diabetes Type 2

Reader question: Can I have any kind of fruit to eat? If you have a question, you can submit it over here or leave a comment on any of our posts and we can chat about it For now we are going to dig into the topic of fruit because it is something that comes up quite a bit. Unfortunately when it comes to fruit there aren't many options to choose from when you have diabetes, which can be a bit disappointing for some people who do love their fruit. Let's talk about why and then go over your best options. Fruit Is Sugar Although fruit is a natural food source, one thing to keep in mind is that fruit is high in natural sugar, predominantly fructose. This can be slightly problematic for a few different reasons. All forms of sugar/ carbs can increase blood sugar levels. Fructose is managed solely by the liver and diabetes is both a pancreas and a liver problem. You don't need to clog up the liver anymore by adding the extra load of additional fructose. Unnecessary burden on the body – sugar is sugar and your body is going to have to deal with that. The pancreas is forced to deal out more insulin, your cells have to welcome more glucose, and your liver has to process fructose. When you add additional load to the body and force it to deal with it, you are basically pushing the progression of your disease along much faster. So is it really worth indulging? Well before you decide let's just talk about what types of fruits and how much people can generally handle. Best Fruit For Type 2 Diabetes YES most people can have these Per 1/4 cup Lemon juice 4.21 g carbs Lime juice 5 g carbs YES most people can have these Per half cup Cherries (77 g) Total carbs 12.33 g Net carbs: 10.43 g. Strawberries (75 g) Total carbs 5.53 g Net carbs: 4.3 g (BEST) Blueberries (76 g) Total carbs 10.72 g Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Beans If you’re looking for foods that raise blood-sugar levels slowly and gently like rolling waves, choose high-quality carbohydrates instead of low-quality carbs like refined grains and sugary foods. Whenever possible, you’ll want to couple these carbs with protein and/or healthy fat. Beans (including black, white, navy, lima, pinto, garbanzo, soy, and kidney) are a winning combination of high-quality carbohydrates, lean protein, and soluble fiber that helps stabilize your body’s blood-sugar levels and keeps hunger in check. Beans are also inexpensive, versatile, and virtually fat-free. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Fruit List

Type 2 Diabetes Fruit List

If your doctor recently diagnosed you with Type 2 diabetes, it's normal to have questions about your food options. Carbohydrates raise blood sugar more than other food components, so in addition to making healthy food choices, you must control your carbohydrate intake. The good news is, as a Type 2 diabetic, you are encouraged to eat fruit. It provides essential vitamins, minerals and nutrients such as fiber. Video of the Day As a Type 2 diabetic, no restrictions are placed on the type of fruit you can eat, so go ahead and enjoy a variety of your favorite fruits. You can choose fresh or frozen fruit. You can also have canned fruit, but check that it does not contain added sugars. It's best to avoid fruit drinks and stick to whole fruit. Fruit drinks can raise blood sugar very quickly and can contain excess calories due to added sugar. Since you're not limited, you can explore and try a wide variety of fruit to determine which ones you enjoy most. This way, you can add your favorites to your weekly shopping list. Common fruits include plums, peaches, mangoes, pears, kiwi, grapes, oranges and bananas. You can also enjoy a variety of berries and melons. Dried fruit provides another option, but usually contains more concentrated calories. This means the portion size is smaller and may be less satisfying than fresh fruit. Fruit counts toward your daily carbohydrate goal. If your doctor has not yet set an individualized goal for you, 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal is a good place to start, according to the American Heart Association. You may need more or less depending on how your diabetes is managed. A good rule of thumb is to fill half of your plate with fruits and vegetables, recommends the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. If you're having fruit as a snack, com Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas, for example, glimepiride (Amaryl) and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Meglitinides, for example, nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin) Thiazolidinediones, for example, pioglitazone (Actos) DPP-4 inhibitors, for example, sitagliptin (Januvia) and linagliptin (Tradjenta) What types of foods are recommended for a type 2 diabetes meal plan? A diabetes meal plan can follow a number of different patterns and have a variable ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The carbohydrates consumed should be low glycemic load and come primarily from vegetables. The fat and proteins consumed should primarily come from plant sources. What type of carbohydrates are recommended for a type 2 diabetic diet plan? Carbohydrates (carbs) are the primary food that raises blood sugar. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure the impact of a carbohydrate on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. The main factors that determine a food's (or meal's) glycemic load are the amount of fiber, fat, and protein it contains. The difference between glycemic index and glycemic load is that glycemic index is a standardized measurement and glycemic load accounts for a real-life portion size. For example, the glycemic index of a bowl of peas is 68 (per 100 grams) but its glycemic load is just 16 (lower the better). If you just referred to the glycemic index, you'd think peas were a bad choice, but in reality, you wouldn't eat 100 grams of peas. With a normal portion size, peas have a healthy glycemic load as well as being an excellent source of pro Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

People with type 2 diabetes know that they need to pay attention to their carbohydrate intake. Of the three main macronutrients in food — protein, fat, and carbohydrates — it's the carbohydrates that directly affect blood sugar levels, and this includes the carbohydrates in fruit. But a study published in August 2013 in the British Medical Journal looked at the association between fruit and type 2 diabetes and found that fruit can still be a crucial part of a good diabetes diet. The study, which followed nearly 190,000 people over a number of years, found that eating whole fruits — especially blueberries, grapes, and apples — significantly reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes. On the flip side, drinking more fruit juices actually increases the risk for diabetes. “If you have type 2 diabetes, you do need to watch your sugar," says Katie Barbera, RD, CDE, of Northwell Health Systems in New Hyde Park, New York. She explains that while both whole fruit and fruit juice have carbohydrates, a small piece of whole fruit is equal to about 4 ounces (oz) of fruit juice. So if you drink 12 oz of fruit juice, you could be getting more than you need. “And whole fruits have a lot of other advantages for a diabetes diet," Barbera adds. Understanding the Carbohydrates in Fruit Like vegetables and grains, fruits contain carbs. You need the fruits for a healthy diet, but with type 2 diabetes you also need to keep track of the carbs. Still, figuring out which fruits are best for diabetes is about more than counting carbs — it's also important to take into account the beneficial nutrients certain fruits provide. “Whole fruits are an excellent source of antioxidants," Barbera says. "They have a lot of fiber, so they make you feel fuller and satisfy your hunger. They also add Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Not all healthy foods are created equal. Greens may be good for you, but the nutrients in iceberg lettuce may not be as plentiful as those in kale, spinach, and Swiss chard. Besides nutrient content, the glycemic index (GI) of a food may also help you make healthy choices. The GI measures how quickly a food will raise blood sugar. Low GI foods have a score of 55 or less, while high GI foods have a score of 70 or more. In general, lower GI foods are a better choice for people with diabetes. Foods that are both nutritious and have a low GI are helpful in managing health and blood glucose levels. Here are 10 superfoods that are especially good for those with diabetes. 1. Non-Starchy Vegetables Non-starchy vegetables have fewer carbs per serving. They include everything from artichokes and asparagus to broccoli and beets. This category of veggies goes a long way in satisfying your hunger and boosting your intake of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals. These vegetables are also low in calories and carbohydrates, making them some of the few foods that people with diabetes can enjoy almost with abandon. In fact, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) identifies most non-starchy vegetables as low GI foods with a ranking of 55 or less. A small study of 11 people found that a low-calorie diet consisting of non-starchy vegetables may successfully reverse type 2 diabetes. 2. Non-Fat or Low-Fat Plain Milk and Yogurt Vitamin D is essential for good health. One of its roles is to keep bones healthy, yet many of us don’t get as much as we need. Non-fat dairy foods, including milk and yogurt, are fortified with vitamin D. These dairy products are smart choices for diabetics because they have low GI scores: Skim milk has a GI score of 32 while reduced fat yogurt has a GI sco Continue reading >>

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