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What Emotions Could The Newly Diagnosed Diabetic Client Be Feeling

How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health

How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health

WRITTEN BY: Mark Heyman, PhD, CDE How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health is part of our Mental Health series. Type 1 isn’t just about counting carbs, checking BGLs and administering insulin. The disease takes an emotional and psychological toll as well. Check out other clinical information and personal stories about Mental Health. When I tell people I am a psychologist who specializes in diabetes, they usually look confused. Most people think of diabetes as a physical condition and have never really thought about the mental aspects with living with the condition. Even some people with diabetes are surprised that there are organizations like CDMH that focus on diabetes and mental health. They know that living with diabetes is hard for them, but often they are surprised to hear that their concerns are actually (and unfortunately) quite common. What is it about diabetes that is so hard? I tend to think about diabetes and mental health issues very broadly. While some people with diabetes have a mental health condition (that may or may not be related to having diabetes), there are many others who struggle with issues that are very real, but which may not meet the (sometimes arbitrary) criteria for a mental health diagnosis. Psychology is the study of how situations, emotions and relationships in our lives interact and impact our behavior. I think that this definition provides us with a framework we can use to talk about how diabetes impacts mental health. Situation Diabetes is a self-managed condition. This means that it is the person with diabetes, not their doctor, who is responsible for taking care of him or herself on a daily basis. Diabetes involves making frequent, sometimes life or death decisions under sometimes stressful and physically uncomfortable circumstances Continue reading >>

Coping With Your Emotions

Coping With Your Emotions

It’s normal to feel overwhelmed. Here are some ways to cope: Learn to understand and accept your feelings, and live well. A diabetes diagnosis can turn your life upside down. It’s normal to feel overwhelmed. Here are some common feelings: Diabetes doesn’t go away. Sometimes I feel like I’ve had enough! After 10 years with diabetes, I just want a break. I need a vacation from diabetes!” Diabetes is demanding. I have to check my sugar and count my carbohydrates before every meal. I always need to have my meter and wear identification. I have so many doctors’ appointments, it’s ridiculous. It’s like having another job.” Diabetes is frightening. Even though I try my best to do all the things I’m supposed to do, I know there’s no guarantee. I might still have complications. That worry is always in the back of my mind.” Diabetes intrudes. So here I am at a job interview. It’s a great job at a great company. I’m trying to focus and make a good impression. Then I had a low and started sweating. It was awful.” Diabetes is frustrating. What irks me the most is that after all that work, my numbers still don’t make sense! Should I even bother?” Diabetes affects friends and family. I see his anger and frustration and I don’t know how to help him.” Diabetes is discouraging. I know what I should do, but I just can’t seem to do it. Maybe I don’t have the energy; maybe I don’t care.” Diabetes is exasperating. First it takes 20 minutes before I finally get transferred to the right person. It took another 2 months before I got an appointment with the doctor. Then all the doctor did was look at my logbook and tell me my numbers were too high. I felt lousy.” Assemble your team. Learn about your disease. Understand your feelings. Here are some Continue reading >>

Emotions & Blood-sugar Levels: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Mood

Emotions & Blood-sugar Levels: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Mood

by John Zrebiac, L.I.C.S.W., and Gail Musen, Ph.D. Diabetes can affect both your physical and mental health. A diagnosis of diabetes certainly adds a huge emotional weight, which can often manifest as depression, anxiety or some other emotional issue. The same goes for the stress of managing diabetes 24/7. Recently, Joslin researchers discovered a link between high levels of glutamate (a neurotransmitter in the brain that is produced by glucose) to symptoms of depression in people with type 1 diabetes. The study showed increased levels of glutamate in the prefrontal area of the brains of such people — an area associated with both higher-level thinking and regulation of emotions. At the same time, the study showed a link between high levels of glutamate and poor glucose control, , and lower scores on some cognitive tests. We believe that if health care practitioners emphasize good glucose control, it may help reduce the probability that patients with diabetes will also become depressed. Clinical depression is more than the normal response of feeling down for a couple of hours or days. It is more dramatic — taking you down further and longer. A psychologist would diagnose clinical depression if a patient has five or more of these symptoms for at least two weeks. At least one of these symptoms has to be depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure. Depressed mood (feeling sad or empty) most of the day, nearly every day Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities, nearly every day Significant weight loss when not dieting, significant weight gain (more than 5 percent of body weight in a month), or significant decrease or increase in appetite nearly every day Trouble sleeping, or sleeping too much, nearly every day Feeling agitated or slug Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Emotional Well-being

Diabetes And Emotional Well-being

Diabetes and Emotional Well-Being Diabetes does not only impact on people physically, but also emotionally and mentally. Did you know? Almost one in five Australian adults will be affected by mental illness each year. The risk of depression is doubled in people with diabetes. Teenagers and the elderly with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing depression. Emotional well-being is an essential part of living a healthy life and managing diabetes. The everyday demands of managing diabetes can impact on a person's emotional well-being, which may lead to diabetes related distress, diabetes burnout or depression. How can diabetes affect emotional well-being? Diabetes related distress refers to the emotional burdens and worries that arise from managing diabetes. Areas that people with diabetes have identified as possibly contributing to diabetes related distress include: worrying about complications, feeling anxious and guilty when diabetes management is sub-optimal, being unsure if moods or feelings are related to diabetes, feeling constantly stressed about food and eating, constant concern over potential hypoglycaemia. Diabetes burnout develops when a person grows tired of managing the everyday demands of diabetes which may lead to an individual ignoring or neglecting day to day diabetes management. Depression is a serious and chronic condition that affects a person's physical and mental health, resulting in an inability to enjoy and carry out usual daily activities. Click here to view the fact sheet Depression and Diabetes. Be informed on signs and symptoms of depression and the relationship between diabetes and depression. Stress is experienced by all at some stage, and we all react in different ways. It is important to recognise that stress can have a direct effect o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Emotions

Diabetes And Emotions

Tweet For anyone with diabetes, experiencing negative emotions such as anger, frustration, hopelessness, fear, guilt and shame is very common. According to NICE (NICE, 2005) when a person is first diagnosed with diabetes, they will often go through similar psychological stages as that of bereavement: Higher HbA1c levels have been found to be associated with physical symptoms including hyperglycemic score, mood including levels of displeasure, depression, tension and fatigue and with worse general well-being. We look at how emotions can affect your life and diabetes management: The relative association varied between 1.02 and 1.36 for each percentage difference in HbA1c. The relation between HbA1c and some mood states have been found to be modified by neuroticism a patient who is less inclined to complain was associated with worse glyceamic control. [45] Mindfulness training has been shown to address depression, stress, anxiety, chronic pain all of which have been implemented with better glycaemia control, diabetes management and greater reported quality of life: More likely to suffer from depression According to the NHS people with diabetes are twice as likely to suffer with depression. Evidence presented by the National Diabetes Support Team indicate that 'recovery from depression is associated with reductions in HbA1c levels of between 0.5% and 1% suggesting that treating depression can not only improve quality of life but could also significantly reduce the risk of complications.' Some stressors may emerge after many weeks, months or years following diagnosis. Alternatively, there may be difficulties that arise upon initial diabetes diagnosis and continue without being resolved. These may include: A NHS Confederation briefing paper has highlighted the importance of i Continue reading >>

Healthcare Professionals: Acknowledging Emotional Reactions In Newly-diagnosed Patients

Healthcare Professionals: Acknowledging Emotional Reactions In Newly-diagnosed Patients

Resources for individuals recently diagnosed with chronic and catastrophic medical conditions, their caregivers, and loved ones. Healthcare Professionals: Acknowledging Emotional Reactions in Newly-Diagnosed Patients Acknowledging Emotional Reactions in Newly-Diagnosed Patients Patients react to a medical diagnosis with a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness and a multitude of other emotions, including in some cases, relief. Patients are individuals, with their own unique set of life experiences and their own ways of coping emotionally with stressful situations. Information plays a role in that having an understanding of ones medical condition, and a sense of the prognosis as well as how treatment and ongoing life management implications. Healthcare professionals are not expected to be psychotherapists or counselors, nor to deliver direct mental health services to their patients. On the contrary, attempting to counsel patients without the benefit of being a trained mental health professional can be harmful to the patient and risky for the untrained professional. However, it is important for healthcare professionals to be able to recognize the emotional reactions of their patients for a variety of reasons. First, patients who are preoccupied with their emotions cannot listen and process information. For example, they cant hear (they hear but they are not listening) to information about their diagnosis and they cant ask relevant questions. If the patients emotional state is not acknowledged by the healthcare professional, time spent attempting to discuss the facts is wasted. The patient may as a result become more distraught and confused, and may misinterpret what is being said. This may lead to further resistance and emotional disturbance. This can be frust Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Emotions

Diabetes And Emotions

Finding out you have diabetes can be a shock. You might feel angry, sad, confused, or stressed about the diagnosis and all the changes it brings. Thats normal. If you work through those emotions, you can get back to feeling good again. Your doctor has confirmed that, yes, you do have diabetes . But do you still feel like "this can't be happening to me"? Or that there's been a mistake, or you want to wait for more test results? Thats denial. Many people react that way when something overwhelming happens. Start to make the adjustment as best you can, and with help from your doctor and support from family and friends. You'll begin to get used to keeping up with your blood sugar tests, medications , doctor appointments, diet, and exercise . Like any other condition, diabetes can be tough to manage at times. You may not understand what your doctors say, or what youre supposed to do. Ask questions about anything that you dont understand. See if there are diabetes education classes nearby. Over time, you will get more familiar with what it means to live with diabetes. It helps to write down a plan for your day. Include when to take your medications, times to test your blood sugar level, your workout for the day, and some healthy eating ideas. You can share this plan with your doctor to see if theres anything you should change. You may think of anger as something bad. But it doesnt have to be destructive or negative. You can make it work for you. Think of anger as a source of energy. Choose to use it to do something positive for your health, such as exercise . The key is to notice when youre angry, and then decide what you will do with those feelings. It's normal to feel sad every once in a while. You may feel blue about having diabetes or about the lifestyle changes youll nee Continue reading >>

Coping With Diagnosis - Emotional Impact And 5 Stages Of Grief

Coping With Diagnosis - Emotional Impact And 5 Stages Of Grief

Coping With Your Diagnosis: Emotional impact and grief Diabetes diagnosis can bring about feelings of grief The memory of the moment of the diabetes diagnosis is a profound one. Psychologists call it a 'flashbulb' memory, in which you can recall all the exact elements of the moment heard the news, with startling clarity. Dealing with the diabetes diagnosis has been compared to the experience of grief. This is the first psychological guide from Dr Jen Nash and is designed to help people to come to terms with their diabetes diagnosis. There are 3 parts to this guide on coping with diabetes diagnosis: Part 1: Emotional impact of diagnosis and grief Part 3: Using cognitive behavioural therapy The diabetes diagnosis can cause a grieving for your lost health, in the same way as you may grieve for a lost loved one. It is a natural human tendency to live life rarely thinking about our health or mortality. And why should we, until something life-changing happens, such as being diagnosed with a chronic health problem such as diabetes . Suddenly, you are hyper-aware that no life is without its limits. Below is an outline of the stages of grief - do you recognise any of these descriptions in your feelings towards diabetes? Below is an outline of the stages of grief - do you recognise any of the descriptions in your feelings towards diabetes? You may not have experienced all of these emotions towards diabetes, or in this particular order. However, Im sure you can see the similarities between these thoughts about diagnosis, and thoughts you may have when faced when you lose someone close to you. In fact many people fluctuate between these different stages for many years, getting stuck at denial, or between anger, bargaining and depression , perhaps with small acceptances along the w Continue reading >>

Dealing With Emotions: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Mood

Dealing With Emotions: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Mood

Having type 2 diabetes can affect not only your physical health but also your emotional health. Getting a diagnosis of diabetes adds an emotional weight onto your shoulders which can be challenging to carry day in and day out. Sometimes this weight can come out as other conditions such as anxiety or depression. There are multiple studies that have shown that external stressors, such as feelings of anxiety or depression, can lead to difficulties in managing self-care. Decreased physical activity, bad food choices, not regularly taking medication are some examples of poor self-care management. Anxiety and stress can lead one to taking up bad habits such as smoking or drinking excessively, which can put a person with diabetes at more risk for developing diabetes related complications. The Grief of Diagnosis When you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you may notice that you start to experience a grieving process. Many people experience the same emotions associated with the loss of a loved one. When you consider the diagnosis of diabetes, it changes your life, you have lost something and you’ve lost your normal carefree life that you had before. These common emotions are explained in more detail below as well as various the ways you can learn to control these emotions or even overcome them. Common Emotions of Diabetes Diabetes is a chronic condition that requires diligent almost 24/7 management. Sometimes this type of schedule can seem like a burden. When this happens, other common emotions or conditions may manifest, causing even more difficulty in managing your blood sugar levels. Stress Stress is one of the most common emotions associated with having type 2 diabetes. Just the constant daily regimen of testing, ensuring you’re taking your medications and monitoring y Continue reading >>

Diabetes Education Improves Depressive State In Newly Diagnosed Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Education Improves Depressive State In Newly Diagnosed Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes 1Bin Chen, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA, Beijing 100700, China. 2Xiyao Zhang, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The 2nd Hospital affiliated to Harbin Medical University, No. 246 of Nangang, District, Harbin 150080, China. 3Xiuping Xu, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA, Beijing 100700, China. 4Xiaofeng Lv, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA, Beijing 100700, China. 5Lu Yao, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA, Beijing 100700, China. 6Xu Huang, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The 2nd Hospital affiliated to Harbin Medical University, No. 246 of Nangang, District, Harbin 150080, China. 7Xueying Guo, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The 2nd Hospital affiliated to Harbin Medical University, No. 246 of Nangang, District, Harbin 150080, China. 8Baozhu Liu, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The 2nd Hospital affiliated to Harbin Medical University, No. 246 of Nangang, District, Harbin 150080, China. 9Qiang Li, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The 2nd Hospital affiliated to Harbin Medical University, No. 246 of Nangang, District, Harbin 150080, China. 10Can Cui, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The 2nd Hospital affiliated to Harbin Medical University, No. 246 of Nangang, District, Harbin 150080, China. 1Bin Chen, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA, Beijing 100700, China. 2Xiyao Zhang, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The 2nd Hospital affiliate Continue reading >>

Stress And Diabetes – How To Cope With Emotions

Stress And Diabetes – How To Cope With Emotions

In recent years, the complexities of the relationship between stress and diabetes have become well known and researched. The link between diabetes and stress has been found. One never forgets the moment of a diabetes diagnosis; a somber and profound memory that hounds for a lifetime, to say the least. While the physical impact of diabetes is well documented, the disease also wreaks havoc on emotional health. Your diabetes diagnosis can be devastating, as you grieve for lost health, and at the same time, try to come to terms with a restricted lifestyle, fear of developing complications, and the uncertainty of starting insulin therapy. All of this can be completely overwhelming, adding a huge emotional weight which can sometimes manifest as anxiety and depression. Add to that the stress of learning how to manage diabetes and live a healthy life despite it, and things don’t look too good for your emotional wellbeing. Truth is, stress and diabetes are closely linked, as your feelings will affect both your quality of life and diabetes management. Coping With A Diabetes Diagnosis If you have recently been diagnosed with diabetes, chances are that you’re going through a bevy of emotions. One of the hardest things to come to terms with is the fact that diabetes is a life-long condition. Even if you’re only prediabetic or your blood sugar levels are only slightly elevated and you still have time to reverse diabetes by eating right, exercising right, losing weight, etc., you still have to deal with the challenging emotions that accompany managing a potentially serious medical condition and making positive changes to your lifestyle. It is completely natural to feel low after your diagnosis. In fact, the link between diabetes and depression is well documented. With the right Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

We understand this can be a frightening time for you. We want you to know we can help. We have some basic information here on this page and we have also created the Succeeding in Your First 30 Days With Type 2 Diabetes guide designed to help you navigate the essentials of diabetes self-management.This comprehensive guide will allow people with newlydiagnosed type 2 diabetes as well as those that still have questions on proper control to take a fresh look at daily diabetes management. Written by certified diabetes educators, this guide helps you eat right, learn how to test your blood sugar, discusses medicines, teaches basic exercises, and even helps you deal withthe emotional aspects of a diabetes diagnosis. You can find out more information about the guide here . A number of chronic diseases fall under the classification of Diabetes Mellitus. They all are metabolic disorders in which the body cannot properly metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins because of defects in insulin secretion and or action. Diabetes develops when the body cannot produce or normally use insulin made by the body. Insulin is an essential hormone made in the pancreas. Insulin is necessary to move glucose (the key source of energy for metabolism) from the blood into most cells of your body. Exceptions include liver and brain cells, which are not insulin dependent. When glucose builds up in the bloodstream, blood glucose (or blood sugar) rises, causing a condition known as hyperglycemia. When blood glucose gets high, people may experience a variety of symptoms. When a person has type 2 diabetes, a number of systems may not be functioning normally. It sometimes takes up to 5-10 years for type 2 diabetes to develop.The following problems may happen over this time period: Beta cells in your pa Continue reading >>

How To Manage The Emotional Toll Of Type 2 Diabetes

How To Manage The Emotional Toll Of Type 2 Diabetes

Many people living with diabetes — including those who are managing it with great success — report that one of the toughest parts is that diabetes never takes a day off. And that means you can’t either. Living with type 2 diabetes every day can make you feel discouraged, angry, sad, stressed, or even depressed. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), studies show that people with diabetes have a greater risk of depression than people without diabetes. Depression is a serious and painful condition that can affect those you love as well as yourself. In addition, depression can interfere with effective diabetes self-care. Common Emotional Side Effects Don’t want to talk about your diagnosis Sleep disturbances No longer taking care of yourself Feel like diabetes is running your life Losing interest in activities and hobbies Withdrawal from family and friends Sudden weight loss or gain Trouble concentrating Tired all the time Thinking about dying or ways to hurt yourself If you have three or more of these symptoms, or if you have just one or two but have been feeling bad for two weeks or more, it's time to get help. Check in with your care team or ask your local office of the ADA about counselors who have worked with people with diabetes. Don’t give up on yourself — and don’t give up on your diabetes-care team. When the going gets rough, turn to trusted people in your life, such as your spouse, loved ones, and friends. Find a diabetes support group — (your certified diabetes educator (CDE) can help with this) — and find out how other people are handling these feelings. Remember, you are not alone. You can control your diabetes rather than letting it control you. Continue reading >>

Mixed Feelings About The Diagnosis Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Consequence Of Adjusting To Health Related Quality Of Life

Mixed Feelings About The Diagnosis Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Consequence Of Adjusting To Health Related Quality Of Life

Mixed Feelings about the Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Consequence of Adjusting To Health Related Quality Of Life We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Mixed Feelings about the Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Consequence of Adjusting To Health Related Quality Of Life Lee Lan Low, Seng Fah Tong, and Wah Yun Low This study aims to explore patients reactions to the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and their health related quality of life. We adopted a qualitative exploratory study design using a thematic analysis. Twelve patients with T2DM for more than a 2-year duration were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Both purposive and theoretical samplings were used for data collection. The in-depth interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim, followed by line-by-line coding and constant comparison to identify the themes. Data management was facilitated using Nvivo 10. Patients shared their mixed feelings about the diagnosis of T2DM. Six domains of quality of life emerged from these interviews, namely physical and social functioning, work function and social obligations, dietary freedom and conforming to treatment standard. Diabetes management needs to take these themes and patients feelings associated with their quality of life into consideration. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, help-seeking behaviour, quality of life, coping, qualitative research Type 2 diabetes mellitus Continue reading >>

The Emotional Side Of Diabetes

The Emotional Side Of Diabetes

Dealing with diabetes puts a lot of attention on blood glucose monitoring and insulin and medications—and those are important, of course. But there is an emotional side to diabetes and effects on your mental health that should be addressed, too. Diabetes interrupts your workday when you have to check your blood glucose. Diabetes means you can't just grab food whenever you want—you have to plan for it. Diabetes prolongs getting ready in the morning as you wash and inspect your feet. Diabetes frustrates you when your taste buds cry out for a pastry instead of an apple. Diabetes makes you worry about your future. All of the time, effort, money, and stress interrupts your emotional stability and introduces emotional complications—and it's okay to be frustrated or overwhelmed or scared. Diabetes and "Being in Control" Let's face it: most of us like being in control, and we don't like feeling that anything is out of our control. When it comes to diabetes, you can feel simultaneously in control and out of control. Out of control: Because of how diabetes affects your body, it is possible to feel that nothing is in your control anymore. You can't eat what you want when you want. You have to take medications or give yourself injections. You can start, perhaps, to feel that your body isn't your own anymore. How to counteract that "out of control" feeling: Taking a step back and an objective look at the situation may help. You can say to yourself, "Yes, diabetes makes me do these things, but diabetes does not run my life." A mantra along those lines—repeated at moments when you're feeling particularly out of control—can help. Also, you can do a mental mind shift: all these steps you're taking to manage your diabetes are actually proactive, healthy steps. You are taking co Continue reading >>

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