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What Drugs Should Not Be Taken With Metformin?

Drug Interactions Of Medications Commonly Used In Diabetes

Drug Interactions Of Medications Commonly Used In Diabetes

When patients are diagnosed with diabetes, a large number of medications become appropriate therapy. These include medications for dyslipidemia, hypertension, antiplatelet therapy, and glycemic control. So many medications can be overwhelming, and it is imperative that patients are thoroughly educated about their drug regimen. Patients have many concerns when multiple medications are started, including prescribing errors, the cost of medications, and possible adverse effects. Significantly, 58% of patients worry that they will be given medications that have drug interactions that will adversely affect their health.1 These worries are not unfounded given that several highly publicized drugs have been withdrawn from the U.S. market in the past several years because of adverse effects from drug interactions. Terfenadine, mibefradil, and cisapride have all been withdrawn from the market specifically because of drug-drug interactions. When terfenadine or cisapride were given with a strong inhibitor of their metabolism, torsades de pointes, a life-threatening drug-induced ventricular arrhythmia associated with QT prolongation, could occur.2 Cisapride, for gastroparesis or gastrointestinal reflux disease, and mibefradil, for hypertension, were prescribed for many patients with diabetes. An adverse drug interaction is defined as an interaction between one or more coadministered medications that results in the alteration of the effectiveness or toxicity of any of the coadministered medications. Drug interactions can be caused by prescription and over-the-counter medications, herbal products or vitamins, foods, diseases, and genetics (family history). The true incidence of drug interactions is unknown because many are not reported, do not result in significant harm to patients, o Continue reading >>

Fortamet

Fortamet

FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets DESCRIPTION FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets contain an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N, Ndimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is a member of the biguanide class of oral antihyperglycemics and is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other class of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The empirical formula of metformin hydrochloride is C4H11N5•HCl and its molecular weight is 165.63. Its structural formula is: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline powder that is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. FORTAMET® Extended-Release Tablets are designed for once-a-day oral administration and deliver 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin hydrochloride. In addition to the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: candellila wax, cellulose acetate, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycols (PEG 400, PEG 8000), polysorbate 80, povidone, sodium lauryl sulfate, synthetic black iron oxides, titanium dioxide, and triacetin. FORTAMET® meets USP Dissolution Test 5. System Components And Performance FORTAMET® was developed as an extended-release formulation of metformin hydrochloride and designed for once-a-day oral administration using the patented single-composition osmotic technology (SCOT™). The tablet is similar in appearance to other film-coated oral administered tablets but it consists of an osmotically active core formulation that is surrounded by a semipermeable membra Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Glyburide And Metformin

Glyburide And Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take glyburide and metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking glyburide and metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking glyburide and metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking glyburide and metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking glyburide and metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking glyburide and metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizziness; lighthea Continue reading >>

Avandamet (metformin And Rosiglitazone) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

Avandamet (metformin And Rosiglitazone) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

What is metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandamet)? Metformin and rosiglitazone is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin and rosiglitazone is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Taking metformin and rosiglitazone may increase your risk of serious heart problems, such as heart attack or stroke . Therefore, metformin and rosiglitazone is available only to certain people with type 2 diabetes that cannot be controlled with other diabetes medications. Metformin and rosiglitazone is available only under a special program called Avandia-Rosiglitazone Medicines Access Program. You must be registered in the program and sign documents stating that you understand the risks and benefits of taking this medication. Metformin and rosiglitazone may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandamet)? This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or irregular heart rate, dizziness , or feeling very weak or tired. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any other serious side effects, such as: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, gen Continue reading >>

Metformin And Other Diabetes Medication

Metformin And Other Diabetes Medication

Tweet Metformin can affect other diabetes medicine. When taking Metformin, it is important to disclose what medication you are already taking. This includes medicine bought without prescription, and also includes herbal medicine. Furthermore, whilst taking Metformin, people with diabetes should consult with their healthcare professional before taking another diabetes medication. Is Metformin suitable to take with other diabetes medicines? Metformin is often prescribed to be taken alongside other diabetes medicine. This may include medication like sulphonylureas and insulin. When people with diabetes take Metformin alongside other diabetes medication they should be monitored closely by their doctor. Can some drugs affect blood glucose levels even if I’m taking medication? Some drugs will enhance the blood glucose lowering affect of Metformin. However, others will cause blood sugar levels to rise. Before starting treatment with any diabetes medication consult your doctor or healthcare professional. The following drugs may require you to adjust your dose of Metformin to keep blood sugar levels stable: Beta-2-agonists, such as salbutamol Corticosteroids, such as prednisolone Diuretics, including thiazide diuretics, eg bendroflumethiazide Lithium Oestrogens and progesterones, such as those contained in oral contraceptives Octreotide and lanreotide Other drugs that should be closely monitored or avoided in conjunction with Metformin include ACE inhibitors, MAOI antidepressants, and Cimetidine. When starting any new drug, whether for diabetes or otherwise, always check with your doctor. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also Continue reading >>

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

The most common medication worldwide for treating diabetes is metformin (Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet). It can help control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s available in tablet form or a clear liquid you take by mouth before meals. Metformin doesn’t treat the underlying cause of diabetes. It treats the symptoms of diabetes by lowering blood sugar. It also increases the use of glucose in peripheral muscles and the liver. Metformin also helps with other things in addition to improving blood sugar. These include: lowering lipids, resulting in a decrease in blood triglyceride levels decreasing “bad” cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) increasing “good” cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL) If you’re taking metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, it may be possible to stop. Instead, you may be able to manage your condition by making certain lifestyle changes, like losing weight and getting more exercise. Read on to learn more about metformin and whether or not it’s possible to stop taking it. However, before you stop taking metformin consult your doctor to ensure this is the right step to take in managing your diabetes. Before you start taking metformin, your doctor will want to discuss your medical history. You won’t be able to take this medication if you have a history of any of the following: alcohol abuse liver disease kidney issues certain heart problems If you are currently taking metformin, you may have encountered some side effects. If you’ve just started treatment with this drug, it’s important to know some of the side effects you may encounter. Most common side effects The most common side effects are digestive issues and may include: diarrhea vomiting nausea heartburn abdominal cramps Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Metformin Drug Interactions

Metformin Drug Interactions

A total of 702 drugs (4976 brand and generic names) are known to interact with metformin. Show all medications in the database that may interact with metformin. Check for interactions with metformin Type in a drug name and select a drug from the list. Common medications checked in combination with metformin metformin alcohol/food Interactions There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with metformin FDA-Approved Weight-Loss Drug - Once-Daily Treatment Need Obesity Help? Learn About an Option That May Help You Reach Your Goal. Prescription treatment website metformin disease Interactions There are 4 disease interactions with metformin which include: The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables. Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit. Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances. Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan. Unknown No information available. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, Continue reading >>

Metformin Warnings

Metformin Warnings

Brand Name(s) : Glucophage, Glucophage SR, Metsol, Competact (in combination with pioglitazone), Eucreas (in combination with vildagliptin) Metformin should be used with caution in: the elderly, those on a very low calorie diet or whom are likely to have surgery under general anaesthesia, or those with any liver problems, kidney problems, a heart disorder, or who drink alcohol to excess, those with sodium restricted diet It should not be used in: women who are breastfeeding, patients with any form of kidney problem or any conditions with the potential to alter renal function such as dehydration, severe infection, shock, or anyone having an injection of contrast agents containing iodine into their muscles; those with severe liver problems, are an alcoholic or are drunk; anyone with a condition that may result in a lack of oxygen in body organs (e.g. heart failure, recent heart attack, shock, or conditions that cause severe breathing difficulties); diabetic ketoacidosis (a life-threatening complication of diabetes that can occur when glucose is not available as a fuel source and fat is used instead, resulting in the accumulation of ketones resulting from the breakdown of fat); or diabetic comatose (unable to wake) or precomatose (leading up to coma) states. Treatment with metformin can cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis (the accumulation of too much acid in the blood), which requires urgent hospital treatment. Its symptoms include muscle cramps, abdominal pain, breathlessness and a feeling of being very weak and unwell. Tell your doctor immediately if you develop these symptoms. There is an increased risk of lactic acidosis in people with kidney disease and in prolonged fasting, excessive alcohol intake and poor blood sugar control. Also see list of precauti Continue reading >>

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Many medications, such as statins and some antihistamines, have a negative interaction with grapefruit. Metformin is used in treatment of type 2 diabetes. Does having grapefruit while taking metformin lead to adverse side effects? There’s limited research, but here’s what you need to know. Metformin is a drug that’s prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can’t use insulin normally. This means they can’t control the amount of sugar in their blood. Metformin helps people with type 2 diabetes control the level of sugar in their blood in several ways, including: decreasing the amount of sugar your body absorbs from food decreasing the amount of sugar produced by your liver increasing your body’s response to the insulin that it makes naturally Metformin can rarely cause a very serious and life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. People with liver, kidney, or heart problems should avoid taking metformin. There are more than 85 drugs that are known to interact with grapefruit. Of these drugs, 43 of them can lead to serious adverse effects. All forms of grapefruit — including freshly squeezed juice, frozen concentrate, and the whole fruit — can lead to drug interaction. Some of the chemicals found in grapefruit can bind to and inactivate an enzyme in your body that’s found in your intestines and liver. This enzyme helps break down the medication you take. Normally when you take a drug orally, it’s broken down slightly by enzymes before it reaches your bloodstream. This means that you receive a little less of the drug in your bloodstream than the amount you initially consumed. But when the enzyme is inhibited — as it is when it interacts with the chemicals in grapefruit — there’s a dramatically larger amount of the dr Continue reading >>

Ecl-metformin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

Ecl-metformin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

have type 1 diabetes (people with type 1 diabetes should always be using insulin) have very poor blood glucose control (these people should not take this medication as the only antidiabetic agent) What side effects are possible with this medication? Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor. The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time. Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects. unusual stomach ache (after the initial stomach ache that can occur at the start of therapy) Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication. Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication? Before you begin taking a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should take this medication. \ Alcohol intake: Anyone taking metformin should avoid excessive alcohol intake. Blood sugar control: If you have fever, trauma, infection, or surgery, you may have a temporary loss Continue reading >>

How Does Metformin Interact With Other Medications Or Foods?

How Does Metformin Interact With Other Medications Or Foods?

Medications that interact with metformin include digoxin, cimetidine, furosemide, nifedipine, amiloride, ranitidine, triamterene, morphine, quinidine, vancomycin, trimethoprim and procainamide. Taking metformin with other drugs that lower blood sugar can raise your risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). This includes probenid, beta-blockers, sulfa drugs, salicylates, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and certain nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Alcohol can also lower your blood sugar and increase the chances of developing lactic acidosis. Your risk of hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may be increased if you take metformin with other medications that increase blood sugar levels. Medications that raise your blood sugar are thyroid medications, steroids, isoniazid, diet pills, seizure medications, birth control pills, diuretics and phenothiazines. There may be other drugs, supplements or food that interact with metformin. People with diabetes should follow a diet and exercise plan. Because diabetes affects your blood sugar, diet is extremely important and you should discuss this with your doctor. Continue reading >>

Herbs To Avoid On Metformin

Herbs To Avoid On Metformin

Metformin is usually prescribed for Type 2 diabetes patients who have trouble maintaining consistent blood sugar levels. As a general rule, it is unsafe to take any herbs, supplements or vitamins while taking metformin unless you have the express approval of your doctor. Many of these over-the-counter substances can lower your blood sugar too much or make the metformin less effective in controlling your blood sugar. Before taking any herbs with this medication, talk to your doctor and pharmacist to ensure safety. Video of the Day Metformin is a type of antidiabetic drug called a biguanide. It is used primarily to lower blood sugar in Type 2 diabetics, but it is also used to treat the side effects of polycystic ovarian syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Some side effects include headache, muscle pain, weakness, mild nausea, vomiting, gas and diarrhea. Take this medication with a meal to avoid some of these side effects, and you should take vitamin B-12 to avoid the deficiency metformin can sometimes cause. Some supplements and herbs lower your blood sugar and can make it drop too low when you're taking metformin. Herbs and supplements in this category include ipriflavone, chromium, ginseng, magnesium, vanadium, aloe, bitter melon, bilberry, burdock, dandelion, fenugreek, garlic, gymnema, lipoic acid and carmitine. St. John's wort and Dong quai can increase the sun sensitivity caused by metformin. Guar gum can interfere with the medication's absorption, and gingko biloba combined with metformin made glucose tolerance worse in patients -- their blood sugars remained higher with the combination. Metformin interacts with many prescription drugs, as well. Tell you doctor if you take the water pill Lasix, the heart medication digoxin or the antibiotic vancomycin. O Continue reading >>

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