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What Does The N In Humulin N Stand For?

Humulin N - Medicine Shoppe

Humulin N - Medicine Shoppe

This product contains insulin. Typically, it is used to control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Following injection, its action starts after a few hours. This product must be injected under the skin (subcutaneously): mix the insulin by gently rolling the vial between the palms of your hands; clean the top of the vial with an alcohol swab; with a syringe, inject in the vial an amount of air equal to the dose to be withdrawn; withdraw the required dose with a syringe; clean the skin at the injection site using an alcohol swab; pinch the skin and inject the insulin into the fold. If you use a short needle, pinching the skin may not be necessary, ask your pharmacist; wait a few days before injecting the same site again. Keep the vial you are using at room temperature and discard it after 28 days. Unopened vials should be stored in the refrigerator. Use this medication regularly and continuously to maintain its beneficial effects. Insulin users should be aware of the symptoms of low blood sugar, which include confusion, headache, hunger, irritability, palpitations, rapid breathing, cold sweats and shakiness. These symptoms require immediate treatment, to bring your blood sugar back up to a safe level. This can be done with a quick source of sugar, such as 3 glucose tablets, a tablespoon of jam or honey, 6 to 8 jellybeans or LifeSavers, a tablespoon of sugar, or 1/2 - 3/4 cup of non-diet soft drink. Inform your doctor if these symptoms have occurred, as it may mean that your diet and/or medication needs to be adjusted. Insulin users must check their blood sugar levels regularly using an appropriate device. Dispose of used syringes and needles safely. Your pharmacist can tell you the best way to do this. In order not to cause hypoglycemia, avoid excessive alcohol Continue reading >>

Insulin Isophane (humulin N) Peaking Early

Insulin Isophane (humulin N) Peaking Early

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Insulin isophane (humulin n) peaking early My daughter is on therapy with humulin r and humulin n (isophane), both administered in the morning. Humulin n should cover lunch. However, as summer has arrived and hot days here in southern Europe, I noticed that humulin n is peaking much earlier making her hypoglicemic before lunch, and it is totally inefficient after lunch (hypers). Does anyone have such experiences? Maybe insulin has lost its characteristics? I normally do not keep pens with current insulin refrigirated, but as it is hot here maybe that affected that insulin. I did not refrigerate loaded pens until few days ago. Hot weather can inhibit insulin's ability to work effectively. Also, hot weather can decrease the body's need for insulin. So you may find that your daughter may need less of either insulins. Are you ensuring that the isophane is properly suspended before injection? Does she also take it in the evening and if so, do you have the same problem? Are you ensuring that the isophane is properly suspended before injection? Does she also take it in the evening and if so, do you have the same problem? As English is not my mother tongue I am not sure what do you mean by "suspended". If that is mixed/shaken, thank you for suggestion, I will make sure that I do it properly. She takes it at the evening too and I don't see problems over night. Only, morning dose is 5,5 while evening is 1 (she is still honeymooning I beleive) so I assume it would be harder to notice problem over night Sent from my SM-G900F using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app Hot weather can inhibit insulin's ability to work effectively. Also, hot weather can decrease the body Continue reading >>

Humulin N Vs. Novolin N: A Side-by-side Comparison

Humulin N Vs. Novolin N: A Side-by-side Comparison

Diabetes is a disease that causes high blood sugar levels. Not treating your high blood sugar levels can damage your heart and blood vessels. It can also lead to stroke, kidney failure, and blindness. Humulin N and Novolin N are both injectable drugs that treat diabetes by lowering your blood sugar levels. Humulin N and Novolin N are two brands of the same kind of insulin. Insulin lowers your blood sugar levels by sending messages to your muscle and fat cells to use sugar from your blood. It also tells your liver to stop making sugar. We’ll help you compare and contrast these drugs to help you decide if one is a better choice for you. Humulin N and Novolin N are both brand names for the same drug, called insulin NPH. Insulin NPH is an intermediate-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin lasts longer in your body than natural insulin does. Both drugs come in a vial as a solution that you inject with a syringe. Humulin N also comes as a solution you inject with a device called a KwikPen. You do not need a prescription to buy Novolin N or Humulin N from the pharmacy. However, you do need to talk to your doctor before you start using it. Only your doctor knows whether this insulin is right for you and how much you need to use. The table below compares more drug features of Humulin N and Novolin N. Humulin N Novolin N What drug is it? Insulin NPH Insulin NPH Why is it used? To control blood sugar in people with diabetes To control blood sugar in people with diabetes Do I need a prescription to buy this drug? No* No* Is a generic version available? No No What forms does it come in? Injectable solution, available in a vial that you use with a syringe Injectable solution, available in a cartridge that you use in a device called a KwikPen Injectable solution, available in Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Humulin N And Humulin R?

What Is The Difference Between Humulin N And Humulin R?

An insulin's onset indicates when the it begins to lower blood glucose, and the peak is the time the insulin is working hardest to decrease blood glucose. The duration describes how long the insulin lasts. Because Humulin R has a faster onset, it is usually injected 30 minutes before meals. If a patient does not eat soon after taking Humulin R, low blood sugar levels may result. In contrast, it is not imperative to eat directly after taking Humulin N, which is usually injected one or two times a day. Both Humulin N and Humulin R are synthetic insulin products that are the same as human insulin. Insulin works by helping blood glucose enter cells and be utilized for energy. Humulin N and Humulin R are sometimes used together to achieve blood glucose control. They are given as an injection under the skin in the stomach, thighs, buttocks or the back of the upper arm. Learn more about Medications & Vitamins Continue reading >>

Changing Insulin Brands May Disrupt Diabetics

Changing Insulin Brands May Disrupt Diabetics

For nearly three years after a miniature pinscher named Ditty was diagnosed with diabetes, his owner successfully managed his blood-sugar levels by giving him regular shots of insulin. Then Ditty abruptly turned hypoglycemic. His owner brought the shaky, unsteady dog to his veterinary clinic in Poland, Maine. Dr. Derralyn Rennix quizzed Ditty’s owner about what might have changed in the dog’s daily routine. Different food? More exercise? That’s when the owner remembered: A week or two earlier, the Wal-Mart pharmacy where she purchased Ditty’s insulin had switched his brand of medication because of changes in pricing. “She was told by the pharmacist that they were the same,” Rennix told the VIN News Service. “...They switched — without calling us, without asking us, without telling us, they just told the owner it was the same.” The idea that different brands of the same type of insulin are readily interchangeable isn’t unusual. It’s a common understanding in the medical community. But while it may be true for most human diabetics, switching brands seems to spell trouble for some veterinary patients. On the Veterinary Information Network (VIN), an online community for the profession, numerous practitioners around the country have reported in recent months cases of dogs whose insulin brands were switched developing out-of-control blood glucose levels, a potentially life-threatening condition that can be expensive to remedy. Dr. Sherri Wilson, an internal medicine consultant at VIN, called the information “an eye-opener.” On a message board discussion in which multiple colleagues described cases of dysregulation, Wilson commented, “It has really changed how I think about this brand change ...” Asked about its policies and practices in substitut Continue reading >>

Humulin-n - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Medbroadcast.com

Humulin-n - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Medbroadcast.com

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. NPH is an intermediate-acting insulin. It takes 1 to 3 hours to begin working after injection, reaches its maximum effect between 5 and 8 hours, and stops working after about 18 to 24 hours. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? EachmL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, glycerol, m-cresol, phenol, protamine sulfate, and zinc. May contain dimethicone, hydrochloric acid, and sodium hydroxide. EachmL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, glycerol, m-cresol, phen Continue reading >>

Humulin N (insulin Isophane Aka Insulin Nph)

Humulin N (insulin Isophane Aka Insulin Nph)

Humulin N is one brand of the man-made form of insulin known as insulin NPH or insulin isophane. It is produced by Eli Lilly and Company using recombinant DNA technology from a non-pathological strain of E. coli. It combines human insulin with protamine sulfate to create a crystalline suspension. Humulin N is used to help lower blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Humulin N is one of the few insulins available without a prescription in some states (although you must ask for it at the pharmacy counter, since it has to stay refrigerated). How Does Humulin N Work? Humulin N is an intermediate-acting insulin, which begins to take effect between one and four hours after injection. Its peak effect occurs four to 12 hours after injection and keeps working for 12 to 18 hours after injection. For some people, it can take 24 hours to clear out of their system. Humulin N acts like your body’s natural insulin to lower or normalize your blood sugar levels. It is often used in conjunction with a short-acting insulin and/or other oral anti-diabetic medications (such as Metformin). This insulin can also be mixed with certain other insulins, such as regular insulin. Consult with your doctor on whether mixing insulins is right for you. They can also instruct you on the correct way to do so. Humulin N can be used to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes. Who Should Not Take Humulin N? Do not take Humulin N if you are experiencing hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Do not take Humulin N if you are allergic to insulin isophane or any of its ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, glycerol, m-cresol, phenol, protamine sulfate, and zinc. It may also contain dimethicone, hydrochloric acid, and sodium hydroxide. If your doctor prescribes Humulin N, you will inject Continue reading >>

Humulin N

Humulin N

Generic Name: insulin isophane (IN soo lin EYE soe fane) Brand Names: HumuLIN N, HumuLIN N KwikPen, NovoLIN N, Relion NovoLIN N What is Humulin N? Humulin N (insulin isophane) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is an intermediate-acting insulin that starts to work within 2 to 4 hours after injection, peaks in 4 to 12 hours, and keeps working for 12 to 18 hours. Humulin N is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Humulin N may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important information Do not use Humulin N if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of Humulin N. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, hunger, sweating, pale skin, irritability, dizziness, feeling shaky, or trouble concentrating. Watch for signs of low blood sugar. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humulin N if you are allergic to insulin isophane, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Do not give Humulin N to a child without a doctor's advice. To make sure Humulin N is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using Continue reading >>

Nph Insulin

Nph Insulin

NPH insulin, also known as isophane insulin, is an intermediate–acting insulin given to help control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.[3] It is used by injection under the skin once to twice a day.[1] Onset of effects is typically in 90 minutes and they last for 24 hours.[3] Versions are available that come premixed with a short–acting insulin, such as regular insulin.[2] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] NPH insulin is made by mixing regular insulin and protamine in exact proportions with zinc and phenol such that a neutral-pH is maintained and crystals form.[1] There are human and pig insulin based versions.[1] Protamine insulin was first created in 1936 and NPH insulin in 1946.[1] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.[4] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about 2.23 to 10.35 USD per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[5] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds while in the United States this amount costs about 134.00 USD.[2][6] Chemistry[edit] NPH insulin is cloudy and has an onset of 1–4 hours. Its peak is 6–10 hours and its duration is about 10–16 hours. History[edit] Hans Christian Hagedorn (1888–1971) and August Krogh (1874–1949) obtained the rights for insulin from Banting and Best in Toronto, Canada. In 1923 they formed Nordisk Insulin laboratorium, and in 1926 with August Kongsted he obtained a Danish Royal Charter as a non-profit foundation. In 1936, Hagedorn and B. Norman Jensen discovered that the effects of injecte Continue reading >>

Lantus Vs Humulin N?

Lantus Vs Humulin N?

Extra pokes and cost aside, is there anything I should be concerned about when transitioning from Lantus to Humulin N? I wouldn't switch if I still had insurance. Lantus is so expensive! I think this might be more my (maybe) not fully understanding how it all works, but if I currently take 40 units of Lantus a day, would it be comparable to 40 units of Humulin twice a day, or 20 units twice a day? I'm prepared for a rollercoaster ride while I get it "just right" ... I've heard before people say that Humulin N is "absolutely awful" but never an elaboration on that. So I'm a little nervous, still have some Lantus I'm using up now so I haven't started it YET, but I was unable to really get all my questions answered in the 10-15 minutes I'm "allowed" at the clinic. (I hope I don't sound too stupid LOL. I'm still pretty new at insulin.) ((And I also value other people's opinions and input over the doctor too, really ... I mean - she doesn't use it)) I did MDI with NPH as the basal for decades. I split the basal up into 4 shots, each about 6 hours from each other. I don't think it would be useful as a basal at just twice a day - it would be quite a rollercoaster ride. If you look at the activity curves, it's obvious that NPH or Humulin (not fast acting) is not a straight substitute for Lantus. (What they call "glargine" in the chart is Lantus.) (Although the curve shows Lantus as being very fast, in fact it has its own irregularities, I think the place I cribbed the chart from was trying to sell Lantus as being perfectly flat but I can tell you that it isn't that flat.). But 4 NPH shots, staggered 6 hours from each other, smooths out the one big bump into 4 smaller bumps and the result is pretty flat if not perfectly flat. The areas under the curve (remember calculus class?) Continue reading >>

Humulin-n

Humulin-n

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. NPH is an intermediate-acting insulin. It takes 1 to 3 hours to begin working after injection, reaches its maximum effect between 5 and 8 hours, and stops working after about 18 to 24 hours. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? Vial Each mL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, glycerol, m-cresol, phenol, protamine sulfate, and zinc. May contain dimethicone, hydrochloric acid, and sodium hydroxide. Cartridge/KwikPen Each mL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, Continue reading >>

Humulin N

Humulin N

What Is Humulin N? Humulin® N (NPH insulin) is a non-prescription form of insulin used to treat diabetes. It is an intermediate-acting insulin that starts working more slowly and lasts longer than regular insulin. Humulin N is not derived from animals. Instead, it is produced by combining a manufactured insulin (that is identical to human insulin) with certain chemicals to make it last longer. NPH stands for Neutral Protamine Hagedorn, so named because it has a neutral pH, contains protamine, and was invented by a scientist named Hans Christian Hagedorn. (Click Humulin N Uses for more information, including possible off-label uses.) Who Makes Humulin N? Humulin N is manufactured by Eli Lilly and Company. How Does It Work? Humulin N is a form of insulin, which is a hormone that is naturally produced by the pancreas. This hormone is important for several functions, such as controlling blood sugar. Insulin helps the cells of your body remove glucose ("sugar") from your bloodstream. This sugar fuels your body's cells, giving them the energy they need to work properly. You may need to take insulin if your pancreas has trouble making enough insulin, which is the case in people with type 1 diabetes and in some people who have type 2 diabetes. Normally, your body is able to maintain proper levels of sugar in your blood and inside your cells. However, in people with type 1 diabetes (and sometimes type 2 diabetes), the pancreas has trouble making insulin. This causes too much sugar to accumulate in the blood. Too much sugar can also accumulate in the blood if your body has trouble responding to normal levels of insulin, as is common in type 2 diabetes. Over time, high levels of sugar in the blood can lead to serious health problems in the eyes, feet, hands, kidneys, and heart. H Continue reading >>

When Does Humulin Insulin Peak?

When Does Humulin Insulin Peak?

Like all regular insulins, Humulin R helps to prevent your blood sugar level from rising excessively after meals. The activity of Humulin R typically peaks two to four hours after you inject the medication. To synchronize the peak activity of Humulin R with the blood sugar peak associated with eating, you inject this form of insulin approximately 20 to 30 minutes before meals. Humulin N contains insulin in a chemical suspension that slows and prolongs its release. The peak activity of Humulin N typically occurs approximately eight hours after your injection. The duration of activity is approximately 12 to 16 hours. The activity profile of Humulin N makes it useful for maintaining a relatively constant level of insulin in your bloodstream if administered twice daily. This helps keep your blood sugar level steady between meals. Humulin 70/30 is a premixed formulation containing 70 percent Humulin N and 30 percent Humulin R. The premixed drug is convenient if your doctor prescribes both regular and NPH insulin. Two activity peaks occur with this combination medication; one approximately two hours after injection from the regular insulin and a second lower peak approximately 10 hours after injection from the NPH insulin. Variability in Peak Activity The reported peak activity times for various types of Humulin are averages; your experience may be different. After using Humulin for several weeks, you and your doctor may discover from your home glucose monitoring that you are experiencing peak activity earlier or later than the reported average. If this occurs, the timing of your injections may need to be adjusted. Do not change the dose or timing of your insulin injections unless you talk with your doctor. The peak activity of your insulin dose may also change from one day t Continue reading >>

Humulin N

Humulin N

HUMULIN® N (human insulin [rDNA origin]) isophane) Suspension DESCRIPTION HUMULIN N (human insulin [rDNA origin] isophane) suspension is a human insulin suspension. Human insulin is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. HUMULIN N is a suspension of crystals produced from combining human insulin and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation. The amino acid sequence of HUMULIN N is identical to human insulin and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 with a molecular weight of 5808. HUMULIN N is a sterile white suspension. Each milliliter of HUMULIN N contains 100 units of insulin human, 0.35 mg of protamine sulfate, 16 mg of glycerin, 3.78 mg of dibasic sodium phosphate, 1.6 mg of metacresol, 0.65 mg of phenol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.025 mg zinc ion, and Water for Injection. The pH is 7.0 to 7.5. Sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid may be added during manufacture to adjust the pH. Continue reading >>

Dailymed - Humulin N - Insulin Human Injection, Suspension

Dailymed - Humulin N - Insulin Human Injection, Suspension

In patients with hypersensitivity to HUMULINN or any of its excipients. ( 4 ) Never share a HUMULIN N KwikPen or syringe between patients, even if the needle is changed. ( 5.1 ) Changes in Insulin Regimen: Carry out under close medical supervision and increase frequency of blood glucose monitoring. ( 5.2 ) Hypoglycemia: May be life-threatening. Monitor blood glucose and increase monitoring frequency with changes to insulin dosage, use of glucose lowering medications, meal pattern, physical activity; in patients with renal or hepatic impairment; and in patients with hypoglycemia unawareness. ( 5.3 , 7 , 8.6 , 8.7 ) Hypersensitivity Reactions: May be life-threatening. Discontinue HUMULINN, monitor and treat if indicated. ( 5.4 ) Hypokalemia: May be life-threatening. Monitor potassium levels in patients at risk of hypokalemia and treat if indicated. ( 5.5 ) Fluid Retention and Heart Failure with Concomitant Use of Thiazolidinediones (TZDs): Observe for signs and symptoms of heart failure; consider dosage reduction or discontinuation if heart failure occurs. ( 5.6 ) Adverse reactions observed with HUMULINN include hypoglycemia, allergic reactions, injection site reactions, lipodystrophy, pruritus, rash, weight gain, and edema. ( 6 ) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Eli Lilly and Company at 1-800-LillyRx (1-800-545-5979) or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. Drugs that Affect Glucose Metabolism: Adjustment of insulin dosage may be needed. ( 7.1 , 7.2 , 7.3 ) Anti-Adrenergic Drugs (e.g., beta-blockers, clonidine, guanethidine, and reserpine): Signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia may be reduced or absent. ( 5.3 , 7.4 ) See 17 for PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION and FDA-approved patient labeling. The following adverse reactions are discussed elsewhere in Continue reading >>

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