diabetestalk.net

What Does Lantus Do To The Body?

Lantus

Lantus

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. Insulin glargine is an extended, long-acting insulin. It takes about 90 minutes to begin working after injection, and it stops working after about 24 hours. After injection, insulin glargine is released slowly and constantly into the bloodstream. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? Vial Each mL of sterile solution contains 100 u Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Tweet Lantus is an analogue insulin produced by Sanofi-Aventis with the medical name insulin glargine. Lantus has been available for pharmaceutical use since the year 2000. Lantus hit the news in June 2009 over concerns that it may lead to the formation of cancer. However, the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) found the evidence suggesting the link to be inconclusive and cleared the drug for further use. What is Lantus? Lantus is an ultralente (long acting) analogue insulin. The medical name for Lantus, insulin glargine, is taken from how the DNA of human insulin is modified to form the analogue. In glargine’s case, glycine and two arginines are part of the genetic recombination that helps to produce the insulin. Who is Lantus prescribed to? Lantus can be prescribed for all types of diabetes. However, it is most commonly prescribed to people with type 1 diabetes. Lantus may be prescribed to people with type 2 diabetes for whom oral hypoglycemic agents have not shown to be sufficiently effective. How do I take Lantus? Lantus is injected, usually once daily at the same time each day. Like all insulins, Lantus should be injected subcutaneously (into the fatty tissue underneath the skin). The specific mode of action of Lantus means that it should never be diluted or mixed with any other insulin before injecting. Benefits of Lantus The mode of action of Lantus allows for a peakless profile. Lantus has become a popularly prescribed insulin as its consistent activity can help to reduce nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Side effects of Lantus Being an insulin, hypoglycemia can be a relatively common side effect of using Lantus, if dosages are too strong. Other side effects include allergic reactions and swelling, itching or pain at the injection site. Lantus and cancer link In June 200 Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

Lantus is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Lantus is a long-acting form of insulin and works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping the body to use sugar for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. This medication comes in an injectable form and is usually used once daily. Common side effects include low blood sugar, redness and skin thickening at the injection site, and weight gain. Lantus is a prescription medication used to treat people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. Lantus may be used along with fast-acting insulin or oral medications to control blood sugar. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Lantus can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), allergy, and skin reactions. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar): Early warning signs of hypoglycemia may be different, less noticeable or not noticeable at all in some people. That is why it is important to check your blood sugar as you have been advised by your doctor. Symptoms of hypoglycemia may include: anxiety, irritability, restlessness, trouble concentrating, personality changes, mood changes, or other abnormal behavior tingling in your hands, feet, lips, or tongue dizziness, light-headedness, or drowsiness nightmares or trouble sleeping headache blurred vision slurred speech palpitations (fast heart beat) sweating tremor (shaking) unsteady gait (walking). If you have hypoglycemia often or it is hard for you to know if you have the symptoms of hypoglycemia, talk to your doctor. Mild to moderate hypoglycemia is treated by eating or drinking carbohydrates, such as fruit juice, raisins, sugar candies, Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

What is it used for? How does it work? Lantus vials, Lantus SoloStar pre-filled pens and Lantus penfill cartridges (for use with ClikSTAR or Autopen 24 pens) contain the active ingredient insulin glargine. They are used to treat diabetes. People with diabetes have a deficiency or absence of a hormone manufactured by the pancreas called insulin. Insulin is the main hormone responsible for the control of sugar (glucose) in the blood. People with type one diabetes need to have injections of insulin to control the amount of glucose in their bloodstream. Insulin injections act as a replacement for natural insulin and allow people with diabetes to achieve normal blood glucose levels. Insulin injections work in the same way as natural insulin, by binding to insulin receptors on cells in the body. Insulin causes cells in the liver, muscle and fat tissue to increase their uptake of glucose from the bloodstream. It also decreases the production of glucose by the liver, and has various other effects that lower the amount of glucose in the blood. Lantus contains a type of insulin called insulin glargine. This is known as a long-acting insulin. When injected under the skin it starts working within two to three hours and produces a steady effect for 25 hours. It is used to help provide background control of blood glucose throughout the day. Insulin glargine is normally used in combination with a short-acting insulin, which is given before meals to control the increasing blood glucose levels after eating. It is important to monitor your blood glucose regularly and adjust your insulin dose as required. Your doctor or diabetic team will explain how to do this. Keeping your blood glucose level as close to normal as possible, and not too high or too low, significantly reduces the risk of Continue reading >>

Lantus Dosing

Lantus Dosing

Well, I never thought I’d say this, but it’s a great week to be a person with Type 1 diabetes. With all of the bad news surrounding the Type 2 drug Avandia (rosiglitazone), it’s a relief to know I don’t have to worry about it. I recommended you read my colleague Tara’s blog entry (“Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks”) for the full story. That’s one of the first times in my life I’ve referred to someone as a colleague. What can I say? It’s just not a word in my describe-a-friend/coworker vocabulary. While all of the controversy surrounds Avandia, I’m way over in Type 1 land contemplating whether or not to lower my daily dose of Lantus (insulin glargine). I’ve just started a brand new bottle of Lantus and I’ve been taking my normal 15 units in the morning and then eating a rather normal breakfast and lunch, but I’m still going low in the midmorning and early afternoon. This happened Monday after eating Brussels sprouts and whole-wheat pasta for lunch and only taking one unit of rapid-acting NovoLog (insulin aspart) to help out the Lantus. I’ve known for a while that my body is sensitive to insulin, but lately it’s been a little more sensitive than usual. I took 13 units of Lantus yesterday and my blood glucose was 86 mg/dl before lunch. I often wonder how much of an adjustment two units of Lantus is. While I’m very much locked in on an insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio with my NovoLog, it’s a bit tricky to judge how much the longer-lasting insulins affect your blood glucose. Is there a chart for your Lantus dose? I seem to remember something from when I was diagnosed. I wonder what Google will tell me to do. I realize that Lantus doesn’t have a true peak the way some of the other insulins do, but sometimes it su Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes. The most common side effects of Lantus is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Symptoms include: hunger, sweating, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Other common side effects of Lantus include pain, redness, swelling, itching, or thickening of the skin at the injection site. These side effects usually go away after a few days or weeks. Lantus should be administered subcutaneously (under the skin) once a day at the same time every day. Dose is determined by the individual and the desired blood glucose levels. Lantus may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin glargine on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Lantus. Discuss a plan to manage blood sugar with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Our Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In people with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used with another type of insulin (a short-acting insulin). In people with type 2 diabetes, insulin glargine also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin glargine is a long-acting, manmade version of human insulin. Insulin glargine works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin glargine comes as a solution (liquid) to inject subcutaneously (under the Continue reading >>

Lantus® Has A Proven History

Lantus® Has A Proven History

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

When you eat, your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin. Insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells for energy or storage. If you take insulin, you may need some at mealtime to help lower your blood sugar after you eat. But even between meals, you need insulin in small amounts to help keep blood sugar stable. This is where long-acting insulin comes in. If you have diabetes, either your pancreas can’t produce enough (or any) insulin, or your cells can’t use it efficiently. To control your blood sugar, you need to replace or supplement the normal function of your pancreas with regular insulin injections. Insulin comes in many types. Each type differs in three ways: onset: how quickly it starts working to lower your blood sugar peak: when its effects on your blood sugar are strongest duration: how long it lowers your blood sugar According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the five types of insulin are: Rapid-acting insulin: This type starts to work just 15 minutes after you take it. It peaks within 30 to 90 minutes, and its effects last for three to five hours. Short-acting insulin: This type takes about 30 to 60 minutes to become active in your bloodstream. It peaks in two to four hours, and its effects can last for five to eight hours. It is sometimes called regular-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin: The intermediate type takes one to three hours to start working. It peaks in eight hours and works for 12 to 16 hours. Long-acting insulin: This type takes the longest amount of time to start working. The insulin can take up to 4 hours to get into your bloodstream. Pre-mixed: This is a combination of two different types of insulin: one that controls blood sugar at meals and another that controls blood sugar between meals. Lo Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens even if the needle has been changed. Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects

Lantus Side Effects

Generic Name: insulin glargine (IN su lin GLAR gine) Brand Names: Basaglar KwikPen, Lantus, Lantus Solostar Pen, Toujeo SoloStar What is Lantus? Lantus (insulin glargine) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. Lantus is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes in adults, and type 1 diabetes children who are at least 6 years old. Some brands of insulin glargine are for use only in adults. Carefully follow all instructions for the brand of insulin glargine you are using. Important information You should not use Lantus if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. Never share a Lantus injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another. Lantus is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels. Before taking this medicine You should not use Lantus if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Lantus is not approved for use by anyone younger than 6 years old, and should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure Lantus is safe for you, tell your docto Continue reading >>

Does Lantus Cause Cancer?

Does Lantus Cause Cancer?

I did a Google search on the side effects of Lantus, and one site I found said Lantus may cause cancer. I have type 1 diabetes and have taken Lantus as my basal insulin for about five years. It works pretty well, but now I'm starting to worry. A coworker, who also takes Lantus, may have throat cancer. Could they be connected? Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

What Is Lantus? Lantus® (insulin glargine) is a prescription diabetes medication licensed to treat the following conditions: Type 1 diabetes in adults and children Lantus is a long-acting insulin that is designed to be taken just once a day. Who Makes Lantus? It is manufactured by sanofi-aventis. Effects of Lantus Studies have shown that a single daily dose of Lantus provides a steady level of insulin for 24 hours, without any significant peaks. Theoretically, this may help reduce the chance of dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). How Does It Work? Lantus is a form of insulin, which is a hormone that is naturally produced by the pancreas. This hormone is important for several functions, such as controlling blood sugar. Insulin helps the cells of your body remove glucose ("sugar") from your bloodstream. This sugar fuels your body's cells, giving them the energy they need to work properly. Normally, your body is able to maintain proper levels of sugar in your blood and inside your cells. However, in people with type 1 diabetes (and sometimes type 2 diabetes), the pancreas has trouble making insulin. This causes too much sugar to accumulate in the blood. Too much sugar can also accumulate in the blood if your body has trouble responding to normal levels of insulin, as is common in type 2 diabetes. Over time, high levels of sugar in the blood can lead to serious health problems in the eyes, feet, hands, kidneys, and heart. You may need to take insulin if your pancreas has trouble making enough, which is the case in people with type 1 diabetes and in some people who have type 2 diabetes. Lantus is a long-acting insulin medication. Although it is a solution (liquid) before injection, once Lantus is injected, it forms small particles that dissolve slowly and evenly ove Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

What Is Lantus (Insulin Glargine)? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus to control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus Warnings You will be taught how to properly inject this medication since that is the only way to use it. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. Always wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Lantus is always clear and colorless; look for cloudy solution or clumps in the container before injecting it. Do not use Lantus to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. A short-acting insulin is used to treat this condition. It is recommended that you take a diabetes education program to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. Other medical problems may affect the use of this Continue reading >>

What Are The Side Effects Of Lantus Insulin Diabetes Medication?

What Are The Side Effects Of Lantus Insulin Diabetes Medication?

When one eats, the pancreas produces a hormone known as insulin. Insulin moves glucose from the blood into the glucose receptor cells that the body can then store or use for energy. For diabetes patients, this isn’t necessarily the case, as the pancreas does not release adequate insulin, or the body can’t use the insulin properly. To control blood glucose, a diabetic patient generally has to supplement the normal function of the pancreas with insulin injections before or immediately after consuming food. However, insulin is required between meals, in minimal amounts, to control blood sugar. This is when long-acting insulin, such as Lantus, may be prescribed. Although it is considered effective, those taking Lantus may be at risk of its side effects. Insulin is available in different types and differs in the following ways: Onset – the time it takes to takes to be absorbed into the bloodstream and start working to help regulate blood sugar levels. Peak – when it’s most effective in controlling blood glucose levels. Duration – how long the insulin maintains blood sugar levels. This article focuses on Lantus insulin and the possible unwanted effects an individual may experience while taking this medication. How Does Lantus Work? As indicated above, it’s a diabetic medication used to control blood glucose levels and may be used by patients with type 1 diabetes. Insulin glargine is the active ingredient in the medication. It falls under the category of long-acting insulin, also known as basal or background insulin, and it works slowly to keep the blood glucose under control over the course of an entire day; it takes at least 90 minutes before it starts to work after the shot, and it works for 24 hours after the injection. It is released slowly and constantly in Continue reading >>

More in diabetes