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What Does It Mean If A Doctor Says That A Person Is Pre Diabetic?

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

5 Signs Of Prediabetes That Are Easy To Overlook

5 Signs Of Prediabetes That Are Easy To Overlook

Prediabetes is a new word for a fast-rising problem around the world. It’s a diagnosis made when your blood glucose is higher than it should be, but not high enough to be called diabetes. “Prediabetes is this kind of grey zone,” says Dr. Stewart Harris, a professor in family medicine at the University of Western Ontario’s Schulich School of Medicine who specializes in diabetes. “Your body is metabolically losing the ability to manage blood sugars after eating, and they start to creep up.” As many as six million Canadians can be considered to have prediabetes. The trouble is, many of them don’t know it. Prediabetes often has no symptoms at all. Yet if these people don’t take steps to control their blood sugar now, a diagnosis of diabetes within the next few years is highly likely. Could you have prediabetes? Here are five signs that you might. 1. You’re in a high-risk group for type 2 diabetes. Researchers have identified certain people who are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. These folks are also at risk for prediabetes. If you have a family history of diabetes or an Aboriginal, South Asian, Asian, African or Hispanic background, you’re at higher risk for prediabetes. Other risk factors include being older than 45 and having a sedentary lifestyle. 2. You have a health problem linked to prediabetes. The condition of your body can sometimes point to high blood sugar. If you’re overweight or obese’that is, if your body mass index is over 25’you could have prediabetes. Same goes for having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease or polycystic ovarian syndrome. If you had gestational diabetes, or diabetes diagnosed when you were pregnant, you could develop prediabetes after the baby’s born. 3. You have classic diabetes symptoms Continue reading >>

Cdc's New 'pre-diabetes' Campaign Is Misguided, Mayo Physician Says

Cdc's New 'pre-diabetes' Campaign Is Misguided, Mayo Physician Says

In January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Medical Association, in partnership with the Ad Council, launched a new campaign to increase the public’s awareness of pre-diabetes. According to the CDC, some 86 million American adults may have pre-diabetes, which the agency says is characterized by “blood glucose (sugar) levels [that] are higher than normal — but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.” “Pre-diabetes increases the risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke,” says Ann Albright, director of the CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, in a video released on MedScape with the campaign. Indeed, Albright says that without treatment — “a structured lifestyle program that provides real-life support for healthful eating, increasing physical activity, and enhancing problem-solving skills” — some 15 to 30 percent of people with pre-diabetes will go on to develop full-fledged diabetes within five years. The campaign is encouraging people to talk with their physicians about getting tested for pre-diabetes. Diabetes is certainly a serious disease. It can lead to disabling and sometimes life-threatening health complications, including heart disease, kidney failure, blindness and amputations. More than 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have the disease — a number that has increased four-fold over the past three decades. But many experts are not convinced that pre-diabetes, a term coined by the ADA a few years ago and used almost exclusively in the United States, deserves the attention it’s receiving in the new public awareness campaign. In fact, they don’t think pre-diabetes is a medical condition at all, but rather “an artif Continue reading >>

I’m Pre-diabetic. Now What?

I’m Pre-diabetic. Now What?

So you just got back from the doctor, and your blood work didn’t look good. Your fasting glucose was 110: not diabetic, but not normal either. Your triglycerides were 195, your HDL cholesterol was 35, and your blood pressure has crept up to 130/90. Despite repeated warnings from your doctor, your waistline has continued to expand, maybe partly because you can’t find time to exercise, and you find it nearly impossible to go much more than a day without sweets or snacks of some kind. If you look back at my first post on prediabetes, you’ll see that elevated blood glucose, high triglycerides, low HDL, moderately high blood pressure, and a growing waistline are all potential indicators of a steady march towards diabetes. However, steady does not mean inevitable. It is well within your power to reverse this process, especially now, before actual diabetes kicks in. Your first step should be to get moving. You don’t need to join a gym or become a triathlete to get the benefits of exercise. In fact, the first thing you need to do is stop sitting still. If you ordinarily sit at a desk for hours at a time, working or just surfing the web, get up and move around every hour or so. The more vigorously you move around, the better: Climb the stairs a couple of times, or just get your blood moving. Same thing if you’re a couch potato: Hit the pause button, or use commercial time to move around. If people ask what you’re up to, tell them you’re trying to be more active to get in better health. There’s every chance they’ll (secretly) admire you, and they may even be brave enough to admit they would like to do the same thing. Of course, it also helps to get regular exercise, and it’s hard to beat walking for convenience. Walking daily, or even most days of the week, is Continue reading >>

You’re ‘prediabetic’? Join The Club

You’re ‘prediabetic’? Join The Club

“The numbers don’t lie,” said the home page at doihaveprediabetes.org. “1 in 3 American adults has prediabetes.” The website invited me to take an online risk test, promising that it would require only a minute. The widely promoted site, part of a yearlong media campaign, bore the logos of the American Medical Association, the American Diabetes Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 292,000 people have taken the test. Make that 292,001. I clicked on the yellow button and gave my gender, race and age range. I responded to a couple of questions about family history and my own medical history, said that I was physically active, and filled in my height and weight. How did I do? “Based on these results, you’re likely to have prediabetes and are at high risk for Type 2 diabetes.” The site advised me to see my doctor for a blood test to confirm the results. I would be more worried about this if I hadn’t just read a new analysis in JAMA Internal Medicine. I’m in good company: The study found that more than 80 percent of Americans over age 60 would get the same warning. So would nearly 60 percent of those over age 40, an estimated 73.3 million people. The researchers, at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, used data from 10,175 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Because Type 2 diabetes is a major and growing public health problem, experts certainly do want to help people avoid it. But how useful or meaningful is a test that identifies nearly every older person as likely to have prediabetes? As an accompanying editorial pointed out, it’s “a condition never heard of 10 years ago.” To the lead author, Dr. Saeid Shahraz, a specialist in predictive analysis and comparative effectiveness, the test Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes: The Big Wake-up Call

Pre-diabetes: The Big Wake-up Call

Not many diseases give you a tap on the shoulder and warn you they’re coming. But when it comes to pre-diabetes, you get a second chance – if you’re smart writes Rachel Smith. If you’ve sat in a doctor’s office and been told you had insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome or blood glucose levels that are too high, there’s a good chance you heard the words pre-diabetes at the same time. Hopefully, your doctor also said things along the lines of ‘wake-up call’, ‘this is serious’ and ‘last chance saloon’. Because that’s what pre-diabetes is: a final opportunity to knuckle down, start losing weight and make healthier lifestyle choices – or risk the very real possibility of developing type 2 diabetes. Statistically, a whopping one in four Australians over the age of 25 has either type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes. It’s the most common form of diabetes, striking 85 per cent of people with the condition (around 10-15 per cent have type 1 diabetes, an auto-immune condition that’s completely different to type 2). One person in Australia is diagnosed every five minutes. The Moment of Truth In a nutshell, type 2 diabetes is a condition that messes with the body’s ability to handle insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas and its job is to convert the food we eat into energy. But when you have pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can’t produce insulin in the correct amounts, sending glucose levels soaring. “With pre-diabetes, blood glucose levels aren’t normal but they aren’t as high as one would need for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes,” says Lissa Kirkpatrick, diabetes educator at the Australian Diabetes Council. “Doctors often do a random blood glucose finger prick test. If that’s up over a certain limit one coul Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: What’s It All About?

Prediabetes: What’s It All About?

Tuesday 15 July 2014 During the last few weeks, prediabetes has been talked about a lot in the media. But there is still some uncertainty around what it actually means. Here Simon O’Neill, Director of Healthcare and Professional Liaison, explains just why it’s important that we identify people who have a high chance of getting Type 2 diabetes and do all we can to help them avoid it if they can. Simon O'Neill “We know that doctors use a range of terms such as prediabetes, borderline diabetes, Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG), Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT) and Impaired Glucose Regulation (IGR). And these might sometimes sound confusing. Your first question might be ‘does this mean I have Type 2 diabetes?’, ‘does this mean I’ll definitely get Type 2 diabetes?’ or even ‘does this mean I’m in the clear?’ “The answer to all of these is no. You don’t have Type 2 diabetes at the moment, but you do need to act now if you want to try and avoid it. “Simply put, these terms can all be used to explain that your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough for you to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. They are largely based on an individual measurement of your blood glucose levels, regardless of any other factors. Having high blood glucose levels can increase your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and other health complications, although this is not inevitable. “Prediabetes isn’t actually a clinical term which is recognised by the World Health Organization. In fact, the American Diabetes Association has set the level for prediabetes at a blood glucose measurement of HbA1C 5.7% (39mmol/mol) but it is the only organisation which uses this criteria. In the UK there is no defined criteria for prediabetes or borderline diabetes. “So Continue reading >>

How Ironic, I Am Pre-diabetic

How Ironic, I Am Pre-diabetic

Sometimes in life you get a wake up call that hits too close to home ... and work. “Your blood sugar is 106 and if you don’t make changes at some point you will have diabetes,” words from my doctor that served as an enormous wake up call. According to the American Diabetes Association, I am not alone, with 79 million people in the U.S. with pre-diabetes and an additional 7 million who have diabetes, but are still undiagnosed. In my world this news comes with a lot of background knowledge. As a member of the Wound Care Advantage team, I am acutely aware of the dangerous slope from diabetes and obesity to non-healing wounds. A rebirth in caring about my health. Getting the news that I was going to be a father was a life-changing event for me. I started thinking about my health and living as long as I can. I headed to my family physician for a full physical after a four-year absence from seeing any doctors. It was during this visit that I learned how truly naïve I was to the danger and reality of diabetes. Despite witnessing my own father fighting type-1 Diabetes for nearly his entire life and more than five years of working in the wound care industry, I still believed it would never happen to me. After all, I ate — for the most part — fairly well. I even occasionally made a kale smoothie and posted it on Instagram. So imagine my surprise as my doctor was going over my test results and said my fasting blood sugar is 106 and I am in danger of becoming a diabetic! If I thought this way, how many other Americans do as well? What qualifies me as pre-diabetic?. To get a better handle on this news, I went straight to the experts and reached out to some new friends at some of the biggest diabetic organizations on the planet. I spoke with John Crowley, director of commu Continue reading >>

Have You Got Pre-diabetes? One In Three Of Us Is On The Brink Of Full Diabetes - Which Cuts Six Years Off Your Life. And Fat Or Slim, You May Be A Victim

Have You Got Pre-diabetes? One In Three Of Us Is On The Brink Of Full Diabetes - Which Cuts Six Years Off Your Life. And Fat Or Slim, You May Be A Victim

The figures are grim. More than one in three adults has ‘pre-diabetes’ and has no idea they’re at risk, according to research just published in the British Medical Journal. As a result, Britain is facing a type 2 diabetes epidemic of unprecedented proportions. Type 2 diabetes, the kind that develops in adulthood and is linked to lifestyle, is not a condition to be dismissed lightly— it can reduce life expectancy and lead to complications such as blindness and amputation that seriously affect quality of life. Pre-diabetes is a term used to indicate you have raised blood sugar levels and are therefore at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes in future. The rapid rise in the numbers said to be affected by pre-diabetes — three times what they were a decade ago — has come as a shock even to medics. Scroll down for video ‘This study has taken us all by surprise — it’s been a bit of a health bombshell,’ says Dr Stephen Lawrence, a GP and clinical adviser on diabetes to the Royal College of General Practitioners. The figures are ‘alarming’, says Simon O’Neill, director of policy at Diabetes UK. ‘It’s worse than we expected.’ It must be acknowledged that some specialists aren’t convinced that pre-diabetes exists. ‘It’s nonsense,’ says Craig Currie, professor of applied pharmacoepidemiology, Institute of Primary Care and Public Health at Cardiff University. ‘Either you have type 2 diabetes or you don’t have type 2 diabetes. I think this is simply a scare tactic to make people take notice.’ However, the consensus is that raised blood sugar levels, whether they’re labelled pre-diabetes or not, are not healthy. So, how can you tell if you are at risk — and what can you do to protect yourself? We talked to the experts... HOW CAN Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Prediabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

What is prediabetes? About 41 million Americans between the ages of 40 and 74 have "prediabetes." Prediabetes is a condition that can be considered an early, yet potentially reversible stage of the development of type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is sometimes called impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose (IGT/IFG), depending upon the test that yielded the abnormal result. In prediabetes, a person's blood sugar (glucose) levels are slightly higher than the normal range, but not high enough for a true diagnosis of diabetes. People with prediabetes have a significant risk of developing full-blown diabetes. In the Diabetes Prevention Program study, about 11% of people with prediabetes developed type II diabetes each year during the three year follow-up time of the study. Importantly, people with prediabetes generally have no symptoms of the condition. Testing for Pre Diabetes Doctors generally use one of two different blood tests to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes. One is called the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG) in which a person's blood glucose level is measured first thing in the morning before breakfast. The normal fasting blood glucose level is below 100 mg/dl. A person with prediabetes has a fasting blood glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dl. If the fasting blood glucose level is to 126 mg/dl or above, a person is considered to have diabetes. The second test used in the diagnosis of diabetes is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), although this test is no longer commonly used as in the past. This test may be used to diagnose gestational diabetes in pregnant women. In this test, a person's blood glucose is measured in the morning after fasting overnight and again two hours after drinking a glucose-rich beverage. The normal value for blood glucose Continue reading >>

Is 6.6/ 120 Blood Sugar Level Too High?

Is 6.6/ 120 Blood Sugar Level Too High?

We love answering reader questions so if you ever have one yourself, please send it in Todays question: I was wondering if a 120 blood sugar level is too high? For those measuring blood sugar in mmol, 120 is equal to 6.6 mmol/l. So let's look at a blood sugar chart, then have a chat about optimal levels. Diabetes Blood Sugar Level Goals mg/dl levels mmol/l levels As you can see from this chart, a level of 6.6/ 120 is not too high. Ideally you do want it under 110 (6.1) for your morning fasting level. But lots of people do find their morning levels higher. Read this to find out why. You can also see that having a 120 (6.6) reading 2 hours after meals would be excellent and before bed a reading of 120 (6.6) is in the mid range too, so that's perfectly okay. The Most Important Number The most important number to keep in mind is 140 (7.8). You do not want to let your blood sugar levels get above 140 (7.8) for any prolonged length of time. When your blood sugar goes over 140 (7.8) this is the ‘danger' level. Having a blood sugar above 140 (7.8) for prolonged periods does some critical damage that can lead to diabetic complications, which nobody wants. So the target is always under 140 (7.8) after meals, 120 (6.6) is even better. 6.6 / 120 Blood Sugar Level Although 120 is not too high, ideally you do want to gain very good control of your blood sugar levels by following a healthy diet and doing regular exercise. If you can get your fasting level between 90-100 mg/dl (5-5.5 mmol/l), and your 2 hour reading between 120-140 mg/dl (6.6-7.8 mmol/l) then that is optimal. These are goals to work towards. While you're here be sure to grab your FREE copy of our blood sugar levels chart. It contains some great tips on lowering high levels too. You just never know when you might need Continue reading >>

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar Overload?

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar Overload?

I walk every day, eat a healthful diet, and have no diabetes in my immediate family. I'm not model skinny (truth be told, I've been known to pack on a few extra pounds), but I'm certainly not a couch potato or junk food addict. So, imagine my surprise when a routine blood test showed that my blood sugar was elevated and I was officially prediabetic. Prediabetic, meaning I have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels that put me at risk of developing diabetes, the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States. Yikes! The fact that I'm not alone doesn't make me feel any better -- 57 million Americans have prediabetes and another 24 million have diabetes (90 to 95 percent of all diabetes diagnosed is type 2, which typically appears in adults and is associated with obesity, physical inactivity, family history, and other factors). Being part of what's shaping up to be a diabetes epidemic in America isn't a club I want to join. Health.com: How to lower your risks for developing diabetes Another wake-up call It turns out that prediabetes isn't really "pre" anything, according to Mark Hyman, M.D., author of "UltraMetabolism" and "The UltraMind Solution: Fix Your Broken Brain by Healing Your Body First." "It's a danger in and of itself that sets off a whole cascade of problems," he says. In fact, there's now evidence that a prediabetic patient's risks for eye, kidney, and nerve damage, as well as heart disease, are nearly as great as a diabetic's, says Alan J. Garber, M.D., chairman of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists task force that's currently writing new guidelines for managing prediabetes. What's more, diabetes can be especially dangerous for mothers and their unborn children, potentially leading to miscarriage or birth defects. Women with diabetes a Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

In pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range. Whilst this raised glucose level is not so high that you have diabetes, you are at increased risk of developing diabetes when you have pre-diabetes. You are also at increased risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke (cardiovascular diseases). If pre-diabetes is treated, it can help to prevent the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The most effective treatment is lifestyle changes, including eating a healthy balanced diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and doing regular physical activity. What is pre-diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If you have pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range but it is not so high that you have diabetes. However, if y Continue reading >>

What Is Pre-diabetes?

What Is Pre-diabetes?

What Should I Do If I Have It? Are you one of the estimated 54 million people in this country who have pre-diabetes? If you have pre-diabetes, you are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and also are at increased risk of developing heart disease. Pre-diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as full-blown diabetes. Those with pre-diabetes are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes within a decade unless they adopt a healthier lifestyle that includes weight loss and more physical activity. First, let's define what "pre-diabetes" is and is not. Diabetes is defined as having a fasting plasma blood glucose level of 126 mg/dl or greater on two separate occasions. If diabetes symptoms exist and you have a casual blood glucose taken at any time that is equal to or greater than 200 mg/dl, and a second test shows the same high blood glucose level, then you have diabetes. In general, people who have a fasting plasma blood glucose in the 100-125 mg/dl range are defined as having impaired fasting glucose. If your doctor gives you an oral glucose tolerance test, and at two-hours your blood glucose is 140-199 mg/dl, you have "impaired glucose tolerance". Either of these is medical terminology for what your doctor is probably referring to when he says you have "pre-diabetes." Be sure to ask your doctor what your exact blood sugar test results are when he tells you that you have "pre-diabetes." Some physicians are not as familiar as they should be with the new national guidelines for diagnosing diabetes. They may be telling you that you have pre-diabetes, when in fact you have actual diabetes. Among those who should be screened for pre-diabetes include overweight adults age 45 and older and those u Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes?

What Is Prediabetes?

Prediabetes is a wake-up call that you’re on the path to diabetes. But it’s not too late to turn things around. If you have it (like 86 million other Americans), your blood sugar (glucose) level is higher than it should be, but not in the diabetes range. People used to call it "borderline" diabetes. Normally, your body makes a hormone called insulin to help control your blood sugar. When you have prediabetes, that system doesn't work as well as it should. You might not be able to make enough insulin after eating, or your body might not respond to insulin properly. Prediabetes makes you more likely to get heart disease or have a stroke. But you can take action to lower those risks. Your doctor will give you one of three simple blood tests: Fasting plasma glucose test. You won't eat for 8 hours before taking this blood test. The results are: Normal if your blood sugar is less than 100 Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 100-125 Diabetes if your blood sugar is 126 or higher Oral glucose tolerance test. First, you'll take the fasting glucose test. Then you'll drink a sugary solution. Two hours after that, you'll take another blood test. The results are: Normal if your blood sugar is less than 140 after the second test Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 140-199 after the second test Diabetes if your blood sugar is 200 or higher after the second test Hemoglobin A1C (or average blood sugar) test. This blood test shows your average blood sugar level for the past 2 to 3 months. Doctors can use it to diagnose prediabetes or diabetes or, if you already know you have diabetes, it helps show whether it's under control. The results are: Normal: 5.6% or less Prediabetes: 5.7 to 6.4% Diabetes: 6.5% or above You may need to take the test again to confirm the results. Lifestyle change Continue reading >>

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