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What Does It Mean If A Doctor Says That A Person Is Pre Diabetic?

5 Signs Of Prediabetes That Are Easy To Overlook

5 Signs Of Prediabetes That Are Easy To Overlook

Prediabetes is a new word for a fast-rising problem around the world. It’s a diagnosis made when your blood glucose is higher than it should be, but not high enough to be called diabetes. “Prediabetes is this kind of grey zone,” says Dr. Stewart Harris, a professor in family medicine at the University of Western Ontario’s Schulich School of Medicine who specializes in diabetes. “Your body is metabolically losing the ability to manage blood sugars after eating, and they start to creep up.” As many as six million Canadians can be considered to have prediabetes. The trouble is, many of them don’t know it. Prediabetes often has no symptoms at all. Yet if these people don’t take steps to control their blood sugar now, a diagnosis of diabetes within the next few years is highly likely. Could you have prediabetes? Here are five signs that you might. 1. You’re in a high-risk group for type 2 diabetes. Researchers have identified certain people who are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. These folks are also at risk for prediabetes. If you have a family history of diabetes or an Aboriginal, South Asian, Asian, African or Hispanic background, you’re at higher risk for prediabetes. Other risk factors include being older than 45 and having a sedentary lifestyle. 2. You have a health problem linked to prediabetes. The condition of your body can sometimes point to high blood sugar. If you’re overweight or obese’that is, if your body mass index is over 25’you could have prediabetes. Same goes for having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease or polycystic ovarian syndrome. If you had gestational diabetes, or diabetes diagnosed when you were pregnant, you could develop prediabetes after the baby’s born. 3. You have classic diabetes symptoms Continue reading >>

I’m Pre-diabetic. Now What?

I’m Pre-diabetic. Now What?

So you just got back from the doctor, and your blood work didn’t look good. Your fasting glucose was 110: not diabetic, but not normal either. Your triglycerides were 195, your HDL cholesterol was 35, and your blood pressure has crept up to 130/90. Despite repeated warnings from your doctor, your waistline has continued to expand, maybe partly because you can’t find time to exercise, and you find it nearly impossible to go much more than a day without sweets or snacks of some kind. If you look back at my first post on prediabetes, you’ll see that elevated blood glucose, high triglycerides, low HDL, moderately high blood pressure, and a growing waistline are all potential indicators of a steady march towards diabetes. However, steady does not mean inevitable. It is well within your power to reverse this process, especially now, before actual diabetes kicks in. Your first step should be to get moving. You don’t need to join a gym or become a triathlete to get the benefits of exercise. In fact, the first thing you need to do is stop sitting still. If you ordinarily sit at a desk for hours at a time, working or just surfing the web, get up and move around every hour or so. The more vigorously you move around, the better: Climb the stairs a couple of times, or just get your blood moving. Same thing if you’re a couch potato: Hit the pause button, or use commercial time to move around. If people ask what you’re up to, tell them you’re trying to be more active to get in better health. There’s every chance they’ll (secretly) admire you, and they may even be brave enough to admit they would like to do the same thing. Of course, it also helps to get regular exercise, and it’s hard to beat walking for convenience. Walking daily, or even most days of the week, is Continue reading >>

Do You Recognize These 11 Early Warning Signs Of Borderline Diabetes?

Do You Recognize These 11 Early Warning Signs Of Borderline Diabetes?

What You Need To Know- Borderline Diabetes Diabetes does not just develop overnight. Borderline diabetes may have no symptoms at all, or you may experience 1 or more of the symptoms described below. You can prevent diabetes if you identify borderline diabetes early. What You Need To Do- Borderline Diabetes If you have any of the symptoms described below then get checked out by your health care provider. If you are in a high risk group than you also should be screen for prediabetes, even if you do not have symptoms. I was stopped at a local function recently and the person I was speaking to told me she was recently diagnosed with borderline diabetes. My acquaintance was very concerned because she read and heard about many of the complications of diabetes; and she wanted to know what this meant for her. She asked me things like “do I need to check my blood sugar all the time now,” “do I need to eat differently,” and “am I going to have to start taking medications?” While I discuss the answers to many of these particular questions in a previous post, I am always struck, in this day of the news coverage of obesity and the diabetes epidemic, how many people have not heard of borderline diabetes and its complications. What Is Borderline Diabetes? Actually, there is no medical diagnosis called “borderline diabetes.” Rather, borderline diabetes refers to a medical condition called prediabetes. This is when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed with type II diabetes. People with borderline diabetes or prediabetes are more likely to develop type II diabetes and may already have some of the signs or symptoms of diabetes. Many times patients with borderline diabetes (prediabetes) will not have any signs or symptoms. Continue reading >>

Is 6.6/ 120 Blood Sugar Level Too High?

Is 6.6/ 120 Blood Sugar Level Too High?

We love answering reader questions so if you ever have one yourself, please send it in Todays question: I was wondering if a 120 blood sugar level is too high? For those measuring blood sugar in mmol, 120 is equal to 6.6 mmol/l. So let's look at a blood sugar chart, then have a chat about optimal levels. Diabetes Blood Sugar Level Goals mg/dl levels mmol/l levels As you can see from this chart, a level of 6.6/ 120 is not too high. Ideally you do want it under 110 (6.1) for your morning fasting level. But lots of people do find their morning levels higher. Read this to find out why. You can also see that having a 120 (6.6) reading 2 hours after meals would be excellent and before bed a reading of 120 (6.6) is in the mid range too, so that's perfectly okay. The Most Important Number The most important number to keep in mind is 140 (7.8). You do not want to let your blood sugar levels get above 140 (7.8) for any prolonged length of time. When your blood sugar goes over 140 (7.8) this is the ‘danger' level. Having a blood sugar above 140 (7.8) for prolonged periods does some critical damage that can lead to diabetic complications, which nobody wants. So the target is always under 140 (7.8) after meals, 120 (6.6) is even better. 6.6 / 120 Blood Sugar Level Although 120 is not too high, ideally you do want to gain very good control of your blood sugar levels by following a healthy diet and doing regular exercise. If you can get your fasting level between 90-100 mg/dl (5-5.5 mmol/l), and your 2 hour reading between 120-140 mg/dl (6.6-7.8 mmol/l) then that is optimal. These are goals to work towards. While you're here be sure to grab your FREE copy of our blood sugar levels chart. It contains some great tips on lowering high levels too. You just never know when you might need Continue reading >>

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

Just a “little touch of sugar?” iStock/stocksnapper If you’re among the 79 million Americans with prediabetes—higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, which boost your risk for full-blown diabetes and related health problems—don’t shrug it off. New research published in the journal The Lancet found that prediabetic patients who had at least one normal blood sugar reading, even for a short period of time, were 56 percent more likely to avoid progressing to diabetes during nearly six years of follow-up after the study. In other words, “This is your chance to take control,” says Matt Longjohn, MD, MPH, senior director of chronic disease prevention for the YMCA-USA. “Research proves that some simple, daily lifestyle changes can dramatically cut the risk for developing diabetes over the next couple of years by 58 percent, which is better than what is seen with frequently prescribed medications like metformin.” The key? Avoid these four roadblocks between you and a healthier future. iStock/martinedoucet The landmark Diabetes Prevention Program study, which followed 3,234 people with prediabetes for three years, revealed that everyday changes—switching up their eating habits and adding more physical activity—helped participants lose a little weight. Trimming just 5 percent to 7 percent of their body weight (that’s 12.5 pounds for a 180 pound person) and exercising slashed the odds for developing full-blown diabetes by a whopping 58 percent. This helps trim abdominal fat—the deep belly fat that settles in your torso, wraps itself around your internal organs, and even invades your liver. It messes with your liver’s ability to regulate blood sugar by pumping out inflammation-boosting compounds that make your body stop obeying insulin. Smart Move: St Continue reading >>

Stopping Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Stopping Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Print Font: Oct. 30 — Nearly 20 million Americans are headed down the road to diabetes, but modest weight loss and a bit more activity would be enough to turn them around. These people have prediabetes, meaning their above-normal blood sugar levels signal a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. A combination of obesity, inactivity and genetics is responsible. But most people with prediabetes aren’t aware they have it, and insurers may not cover testing for or treatment of the condition. “It’s really quite a remarkable opportunity, but it’s not as if everyone is rushing to be identified,” says Dr. Daniel Einhorn of the Scripps Whittier Institute for Diabetes in La Jolla, Calif. Many people may be reluctant to get tested — and labeled — especially if they’re feeling fine, he adds. But catching the condition before it turns into full-blown diabetes can be a lifesaver. People with Type 2 diabetes either lose the ability to respond to insulin, or their bodies no longer make enough of the hormone. Insulin helps the body use glucose as fuel, so without it sugar builds up in the bloodstream. Over time, especially if blood sugar levels are not kept in check, diabetes can boost a person’s risk of heart disease and cause damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves and other body tissues. Prediabetes used to be called impaired fasting glucos Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

Are you urinating more often, feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired? Maybe you’re losing weight. You may have type 2 diabetes. To find out, you can make an appointment with your doctor and have your blood tested for the condition. Or you can go to the drug store, buy a blood glucose meter, and give yourself a diabetes test. An estimated 40 percent of adults with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it, which means they aren’t getting treatment that could protect them from very serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney failure. The best option is to go to a doctor if you’re having symptoms of diabetes. But if you’re reluctant to do that, for whatever reason, the next best thing is to buy an over-the-counter diabetes test kit. "If you have a family history of diabetes, are obese, or have high blood pressure, you should test yourself for diabetes, if your doctor hasn’t already done so," says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "By being a proactive person, you might save yourself a lot of grief in the future.” Blood glucose meters can be purchased without a prescription. Models in our Ratings of more than two dozen devices cost $10 to $75. They usually come with 10 lancets, but you might have to buy a pack of test strips separately, which can cost $18 and up; check the package to see what it includes. If the meter doesn’t come with strips, make sure you buy a pack made for that model or you’ll get inaccurate results. Most models come with batteries. Here’s what you need to do next: Fast overnight. Don’t have anything to eat or drink (except water) for at least 8 hours, then test yourself first thing in the morning, before breakfast. Follow directions. Read the manual to ma Continue reading >>

Why Aren’t More People Treated For Prediabetes?

Why Aren’t More People Treated For Prediabetes?

What if one in three American adults had a condition that put them at higher-than-normal risk of developing diabetes? What if the vast majority of them were unaware that they were sitting on this ticking time bomb? And what if their doctors knew they had this condition, but didn’t tell them or didn’t provide treatment – or just plain missed the diagnosis? Those are a lot of ifs – but they form the basis of questions that a team of researchers from the University of Florida asked themselves when they started thinking about the number of Americans living with prediabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 86 million have prediabetes and nine in 10 don’t know it. Another team of researchers, writing in JAMA Internal Medicine in October 2016, estimate that about 58.7 percent of people over 40 were at high risk of prediabetes. For those over 60, it jumps to 80.8 percent. Why is that, and what role do doctors play? In search of answers, the University of Florida researchers, whose findings were published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine in March 2016, analyzed data from a 2012 government survey of random doctors. Specifically, they looked at patients age 45 and up who'd had an A1C blood test, used to measure average blood sugar, within 90 days of their doctor visit. The scientists found that 34% had blood sugar levels in the prediabetes range. Of these, only 23% were in treatment, either via medication or lifestyle changes. The question remains: Why did three out of four people with prediabetes not receive treatment? We went to endocrinologist Jack Merendino, MD, a Sharecare Advisory Board member, best-selling author and Assistant Clinical Professor at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Chi Continue reading >>

Cdc's New 'pre-diabetes' Campaign Is Misguided, Mayo Physician Says

Cdc's New 'pre-diabetes' Campaign Is Misguided, Mayo Physician Says

In January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Medical Association, in partnership with the Ad Council, launched a new campaign to increase the public’s awareness of pre-diabetes. According to the CDC, some 86 million American adults may have pre-diabetes, which the agency says is characterized by “blood glucose (sugar) levels [that] are higher than normal — but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.” “Pre-diabetes increases the risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke,” says Ann Albright, director of the CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, in a video released on MedScape with the campaign. Indeed, Albright says that without treatment — “a structured lifestyle program that provides real-life support for healthful eating, increasing physical activity, and enhancing problem-solving skills” — some 15 to 30 percent of people with pre-diabetes will go on to develop full-fledged diabetes within five years. The campaign is encouraging people to talk with their physicians about getting tested for pre-diabetes. Diabetes is certainly a serious disease. It can lead to disabling and sometimes life-threatening health complications, including heart disease, kidney failure, blindness and amputations. More than 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have the disease — a number that has increased four-fold over the past three decades. But many experts are not convinced that pre-diabetes, a term coined by the ADA a few years ago and used almost exclusively in the United States, deserves the attention it’s receiving in the new public awareness campaign. In fact, they don’t think pre-diabetes is a medical condition at all, but rather “an artif Continue reading >>

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

If you have not been diagnosed with diabetes but suspect you might have something wrong with your blood sugar, there is a simple way to find out. What you need to do is to test your blood sugar after you have eaten a meal that contains about sixty grams of carbohydrates. You can ask your doctor to test your blood sugar in the office if you have an appointment that takes place an hour or two after you've eaten or, if this isn't an option, you can use an inexpensive blood sugar meter to test your post-meal blood sugar yourself at home. You do not need a prescription to buy the meter or strips. One advantage of testing yourself at home is that with self-testing you do not run the risk of having a "diabetes" diagnosis written into your medical records which might make it impossible for you to buy health or life insurance. To run a post-meal blood sugar test do following: Borrow a family member's meter or buy an inexpensive meter and strips at the drug store or Walmart. The Walmart Relion meter store brand meters sold at pharamcies like CVS, Walgreens, etc are usually the least expensive. Some meters come with 10 free strips. Check to see if the meter you have bought includes strips. If it doesn't, buy the smallest package size available. Strips do not keep for very long once opened, so don't buy more than you need for a couple tests. Familiarize yourself with the instructions that came with your meter so that you know how to run a blood test. Practice a few times before you run your official test. Each meter is different. Be sure you understand how yours works. The first thing in the morning after you wake up but before you have eaten anything, test your blood sugar. Write down the result. This is your "fasting blood sugar." Now eat something containing at 60 - 70 grams of Continue reading >>

Diabetes: You’ve Been Told You’re Pre-diabetic

Diabetes: You’ve Been Told You’re Pre-diabetic

One in three American adults have pre-diabetes, but nine out of 10 don’t know they have it because there are no symptoms. For most patients, the only way to know you have pre-diabetes is through a blood test. If you’ve been diagnosed with pre-diabetes it means your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough for you to be considered diabetic. When an individual has pre-diabetes it means they are beginning to develop insulin resistance—which slows the flow of glucose to the cells, causing a back-up of sugar in the blood. If you are diagnosed with prediabetes and you don’t make important lifestyle changes, you could develop type two diabetes. Having diabetes also puts you at risk for kidney failure, heart disease, stroke and blindness. Fortunately, pre-diabetes can be reversed. A recent study on diabetes prevention found that patients with pre-diabetes decreased their risk of diabetes by 58 percent through diet and exercise. Regular physical activity and weight loss are some of the best things you can do to prevent the onset of diabetes. Cut sugary drinks out of your diet and limit fried food. Adequate sleep and stress management will also help keep your blood sugar levels in the normal range. By detecting pre-diabetes early and adopting the proper lifestyle modifications, a diabetes diagnosis can be postponed and/or prevented. Individuals who are diagnosed with pre-diabetes should talk to their doctor about getting a referral to nutrition and diabetes education services to develop a preventative plan customized to their health condition and personal needs. Cone Health’s Diabetes Centers have exceptional teams of registered dieticians and certified diabetes educators dedicated to educating and treating patients throughout the community with pr Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes: The Big Wake-up Call

Pre-diabetes: The Big Wake-up Call

Not many diseases give you a tap on the shoulder and warn you they’re coming. But when it comes to pre-diabetes, you get a second chance – if you’re smart writes Rachel Smith. If you’ve sat in a doctor’s office and been told you had insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome or blood glucose levels that are too high, there’s a good chance you heard the words pre-diabetes at the same time. Hopefully, your doctor also said things along the lines of ‘wake-up call’, ‘this is serious’ and ‘last chance saloon’. Because that’s what pre-diabetes is: a final opportunity to knuckle down, start losing weight and make healthier lifestyle choices – or risk the very real possibility of developing type 2 diabetes. Statistically, a whopping one in four Australians over the age of 25 has either type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes. It’s the most common form of diabetes, striking 85 per cent of people with the condition (around 10-15 per cent have type 1 diabetes, an auto-immune condition that’s completely different to type 2). One person in Australia is diagnosed every five minutes. The Moment of Truth In a nutshell, type 2 diabetes is a condition that messes with the body’s ability to handle insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas and its job is to convert the food we eat into energy. But when you have pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can’t produce insulin in the correct amounts, sending glucose levels soaring. “With pre-diabetes, blood glucose levels aren’t normal but they aren’t as high as one would need for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes,” says Lissa Kirkpatrick, diabetes educator at the Australian Diabetes Council. “Doctors often do a random blood glucose finger prick test. If that’s up over a certain limit one coul Continue reading >>

What Is Pre-diabetes?

What Is Pre-diabetes?

What Should I Do If I Have It? Are you one of the estimated 54 million people in this country who have pre-diabetes? If you have pre-diabetes, you are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and also are at increased risk of developing heart disease. Pre-diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as full-blown diabetes. Those with pre-diabetes are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes within a decade unless they adopt a healthier lifestyle that includes weight loss and more physical activity. First, let's define what "pre-diabetes" is and is not. Diabetes is defined as having a fasting plasma blood glucose level of 126 mg/dl or greater on two separate occasions. If diabetes symptoms exist and you have a casual blood glucose taken at any time that is equal to or greater than 200 mg/dl, and a second test shows the same high blood glucose level, then you have diabetes. In general, people who have a fasting plasma blood glucose in the 100-125 mg/dl range are defined as having impaired fasting glucose. If your doctor gives you an oral glucose tolerance test, and at two-hours your blood glucose is 140-199 mg/dl, you have "impaired glucose tolerance". Either of these is medical terminology for what your doctor is probably referring to when he says you have "pre-diabetes." Be sure to ask your doctor what your exact blood sugar test results are when he tells you that you have "pre-diabetes." Some physicians are not as familiar as they should be with the new national guidelines for diagnosing diabetes. They may be telling you that you have pre-diabetes, when in fact you have actual diabetes. Among those who should be screened for pre-diabetes include overweight adults age 45 and older and those u Continue reading >>

Prediabetes? What Does It Mean For Your Kidneys?

Prediabetes? What Does It Mean For Your Kidneys?

Prediabetes describes the condition of someone who is on their way to developing diabetes. Before having diabetes, people usually have “pre-diabetes.” This is a new name for a condition in which blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. A person with prediabetes cannot handle sugar as well as they should. Even though diabetes is not full blown, high sugar levels in prediabetes can be causing problems throughout the body. One of the main organs that can be damaged is the kidney. People with prediabetes often have unrecognized chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to new research. In this large study, more than one third of the people with prediabetes were found to have two signs of kidney disease: protein in the urine (called albuminuria). Albuminuria is not normal. reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This is a measure of how well the kidneys work; the eGFR tells the stage of kidney disease. In the people with prediabetes, the stage of chronic kidney disease was just as advanced as people with diabetes. Many people with either prediabetes or diabetes were found to have stage 3 or 4 chronic kidney disease. There are 5 stages of chronic kidney disease. When the disease reaches stage 5, the person will need kidney replacement therapy, either transplantation or dialysis. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates that about one in four U.S. adults aged 20 years or older—or 57 million people—have pre—diabetes. Without patients and their doctors taking action, prediabetes is likely to become type 2 diabetes in 10 years or less. People with prediabetes should know that the long—term damage to their body—especially to the heart, kidneys and blood vessels — may alread Continue reading >>

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar Overload?

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar Overload?

I walk every day, eat a healthful diet, and have no diabetes in my immediate family. I'm not model skinny (truth be told, I've been known to pack on a few extra pounds), but I'm certainly not a couch potato or junk food addict. So, imagine my surprise when a routine blood test showed that my blood sugar was elevated and I was officially prediabetic. Prediabetic, meaning I have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels that put me at risk of developing diabetes, the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States. Yikes! The fact that I'm not alone doesn't make me feel any better -- 57 million Americans have prediabetes and another 24 million have diabetes (90 to 95 percent of all diabetes diagnosed is type 2, which typically appears in adults and is associated with obesity, physical inactivity, family history, and other factors). Being part of what's shaping up to be a diabetes epidemic in America isn't a club I want to join. Health.com: How to lower your risks for developing diabetes Another wake-up call It turns out that prediabetes isn't really "pre" anything, according to Mark Hyman, M.D., author of "UltraMetabolism" and "The UltraMind Solution: Fix Your Broken Brain by Healing Your Body First." "It's a danger in and of itself that sets off a whole cascade of problems," he says. In fact, there's now evidence that a prediabetic patient's risks for eye, kidney, and nerve damage, as well as heart disease, are nearly as great as a diabetic's, says Alan J. Garber, M.D., chairman of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists task force that's currently writing new guidelines for managing prediabetes. What's more, diabetes can be especially dangerous for mothers and their unborn children, potentially leading to miscarriage or birth defects. Women with diabetes a Continue reading >>

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