diabetestalk.net

What Does It Mean If A Doctor Says That A Person Is Pre Diabetic?

No, It's The Same Thing. Doctors Just Refer Prediabetes Differently Sometimes, Depending On Which Test Was Used To Diagnose It.

No, It's The Same Thing. Doctors Just Refer Prediabetes Differently Sometimes, Depending On Which Test Was Used To Diagnose It.

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is also written as pre-diabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which a person's blood sugar (glucose) levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to qualify as full-blown diabetes. Before most people develop type 2 diabetes they almost always have prediabetes for maybe up to 10 years beforehand. At least 79 million Americans have prediabetes, but because it is often a silent disorder, many are unaware of it. While a person with prediabetes does not usually develop diabetes complications such as eye disease or kidney damage, research shows that they are still at much greater risk of developing heart attacks and strokes than people with normal blood sugar levels. What Are The Signs? Most people show no obvious signs of prediabetes. If there are any indications, they are likely to be milder versions of symptoms of diabetes such as: • Increased thirst • Frequent urination • Fatigue and feeling generally exhausted • Increased hunger • Recurrent yeast infections or gum infections • Cuts or bruises that are slow to heal • Tingling or numbness in your hands or feet Doctors now recommend that everyone aged over 45 be screened for prediabetes. Testing is also recommended for people under 45 (including children) if they are overweight and have one or more of the following risk factors: • High blood pressure (hypertension). • Low HDL cholesterol (the good stuff). • High triglycerides. • A family history of diabetes. • Belong to a high risk ethnic group: African American, Asian, Hispanic or Native American. For example, 20 percent of American Indians aged 15 years or older have prediabetes. • If they developed gestational diabetes during pregnancy or gave birth to a child weighing more than 9 pounds. For some stati Continue reading >>

Do You Recognize These 11 Early Warning Signs Of Borderline Diabetes?

Do You Recognize These 11 Early Warning Signs Of Borderline Diabetes?

What You Need To Know- Borderline Diabetes Diabetes does not just develop overnight. Borderline diabetes may have no symptoms at all, or you may experience 1 or more of the symptoms described below. You can prevent diabetes if you identify borderline diabetes early. What You Need To Do- Borderline Diabetes If you have any of the symptoms described below then get checked out by your health care provider. If you are in a high risk group than you also should be screen for prediabetes, even if you do not have symptoms. I was stopped at a local function recently and the person I was speaking to told me she was recently diagnosed with borderline diabetes. My acquaintance was very concerned because she read and heard about many of the complications of diabetes; and she wanted to know what this meant for her. She asked me things like “do I need to check my blood sugar all the time now,” “do I need to eat differently,” and “am I going to have to start taking medications?” While I discuss the answers to many of these particular questions in a previous post, I am always struck, in this day of the news coverage of obesity and the diabetes epidemic, how many people have not heard of borderline diabetes and its complications. What Is Borderline Diabetes? Actually, there is no medical diagnosis called “borderline diabetes.” Rather, borderline diabetes refers to a medical condition called prediabetes. This is when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed with type II diabetes. People with borderline diabetes or prediabetes are more likely to develop type II diabetes and may already have some of the signs or symptoms of diabetes. Many times patients with borderline diabetes (prediabetes) will not have any signs or symptoms. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Tweet Prediabetes, also commonly referred to as borderline diabetes, is a metabolic condition and growing global problem that is closely tied to obesity. If undiagnosed or untreated, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes; which whilst treatable is currently not fully reversible. What is prediabetes? Prediabetes is characterised by the presence of blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be classed as diabetes. For this reason, prediabetes is often described as the “gray area” between normal blood sugar and diabetic levels. In the UK, around 7 million people are estimated to have prediabetes and thus have a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. [17] Prediabetes may be referred to as impaired fasting glucose (IFT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels after a period of fasting, or as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels following eating. The increasing number of new cases of prediabetes presents a global concern as it carries large scale implications towards the future burden on healthcare. Between 2003 and 2011, the prevalence of prediabetes in England alone more than tripled, with 35.3% of the adult population, or 1 in every 3 people having prediabetes. [106] Learn more about prediabetes Prediabetes is a critical stage in the development of diabetes, for it is at this point that lifestyle choices can be made to turn it around. Early, decisive action can slow down or even halt the development of type 2 diabetes. What are the symptoms of prediabetes? Many people have prediabetes but are completely unaware of it. This is because the condition often develops gradually without any warning signs or symptoms. In many cases, the sufferer only learns of their borderline diabetic sta Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is the precursor stage before diabetes mellitus in which not all of the symptoms required to diagnose diabetes are present, but blood sugar is abnormally high. This stage is often referred to as the "grey area."[1] It is not a disease; the American Diabetes Association says,[2] "Prediabetes should not be viewed as a clinical entity in its own right but rather as an increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Prediabetes is associated with obesity (especially abdominal or visceral obesity), dyslipidemia with high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension."[2] It is thus a metabolic diathesis or syndrome, and it usually involves no symptoms and only high blood sugar as the sole sign. Impaired fasting blood sugar and impaired glucose tolerance are two forms of prediabetes that are similar in clinical definition (glucose levels too high for their context) but are physiologically distinct.[3] Insulin resistance, the insulin resistance syndrome (metabolic syndrome or syndrome X), and prediabetes are closely related to one another and have overlapping aspects. Classification[edit] Impaired fasting glucose[edit] Main article: Impaired fasting glycaemia Impaired fasting glycaemia or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) refers to a condition in which the fasting blood glucose or the 3-month average blood glucose (A1C) is elevated above what is considered normal levels but is not high enough to be classified as diabetes mellitus. It is considered a pre-diabetic state, associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology, although of lesser risk than impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IFG sometimes progresses to type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a 50% risk over 10 years of progressing to overt diabetes. Many newl Continue reading >>

Stopping Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Stopping Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Print Font: Oct. 30 — Nearly 20 million Americans are headed down the road to diabetes, but modest weight loss and a bit more activity would be enough to turn them around. These people have prediabetes, meaning their above-normal blood sugar levels signal a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. A combination of obesity, inactivity and genetics is responsible. But most people with prediabetes aren’t aware they have it, and insurers may not cover testing for or treatment of the condition. “It’s really quite a remarkable opportunity, but it’s not as if everyone is rushing to be identified,” says Dr. Daniel Einhorn of the Scripps Whittier Institute for Diabetes in La Jolla, Calif. Many people may be reluctant to get tested — and labeled — especially if they’re feeling fine, he adds. But catching the condition before it turns into full-blown diabetes can be a lifesaver. People with Type 2 diabetes either lose the ability to respond to insulin, or their bodies no longer make enough of the hormone. Insulin helps the body use glucose as fuel, so without it sugar builds up in the bloodstream. Over time, especially if blood sugar levels are not kept in check, diabetes can boost a person’s risk of heart disease and cause damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves and other body tissues. Prediabetes used to be called impaired fasting glucos Continue reading >>

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

Just a “little touch of sugar?” iStock/stocksnapper If you’re among the 79 million Americans with prediabetes—higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, which boost your risk for full-blown diabetes and related health problems—don’t shrug it off. New research published in the journal The Lancet found that prediabetic patients who had at least one normal blood sugar reading, even for a short period of time, were 56 percent more likely to avoid progressing to diabetes during nearly six years of follow-up after the study. In other words, “This is your chance to take control,” says Matt Longjohn, MD, MPH, senior director of chronic disease prevention for the YMCA-USA. “Research proves that some simple, daily lifestyle changes can dramatically cut the risk for developing diabetes over the next couple of years by 58 percent, which is better than what is seen with frequently prescribed medications like metformin.” The key? Avoid these four roadblocks between you and a healthier future. iStock/martinedoucet The landmark Diabetes Prevention Program study, which followed 3,234 people with prediabetes for three years, revealed that everyday changes—switching up their eating habits and adding more physical activity—helped participants lose a little weight. Trimming just 5 percent to 7 percent of their body weight (that’s 12.5 pounds for a 180 pound person) and exercising slashed the odds for developing full-blown diabetes by a whopping 58 percent. This helps trim abdominal fat—the deep belly fat that settles in your torso, wraps itself around your internal organs, and even invades your liver. It messes with your liver’s ability to regulate blood sugar by pumping out inflammation-boosting compounds that make your body stop obeying insulin. Smart Move: St Continue reading >>

Diabetes: You’ve Been Told You’re Pre-diabetic

Diabetes: You’ve Been Told You’re Pre-diabetic

One in three American adults have pre-diabetes, but nine out of 10 don’t know they have it because there are no symptoms. For most patients, the only way to know you have pre-diabetes is through a blood test. If you’ve been diagnosed with pre-diabetes it means your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough for you to be considered diabetic. When an individual has pre-diabetes it means they are beginning to develop insulin resistance—which slows the flow of glucose to the cells, causing a back-up of sugar in the blood. If you are diagnosed with prediabetes and you don’t make important lifestyle changes, you could develop type two diabetes. Having diabetes also puts you at risk for kidney failure, heart disease, stroke and blindness. Fortunately, pre-diabetes can be reversed. A recent study on diabetes prevention found that patients with pre-diabetes decreased their risk of diabetes by 58 percent through diet and exercise. Regular physical activity and weight loss are some of the best things you can do to prevent the onset of diabetes. Cut sugary drinks out of your diet and limit fried food. Adequate sleep and stress management will also help keep your blood sugar levels in the normal range. By detecting pre-diabetes early and adopting the proper lifestyle modifications, a diabetes diagnosis can be postponed and/or prevented. Individuals who are diagnosed with pre-diabetes should talk to their doctor about getting a referral to nutrition and diabetes education services to develop a preventative plan customized to their health condition and personal needs. Cone Health’s Diabetes Centers have exceptional teams of registered dieticians and certified diabetes educators dedicated to educating and treating patients throughout the community with pr Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Prediabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

What is prediabetes? About 41 million Americans between the ages of 40 and 74 have "prediabetes." Prediabetes is a condition that can be considered an early, yet potentially reversible stage of the development of type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is sometimes called impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose (IGT/IFG), depending upon the test that yielded the abnormal result. In prediabetes, a person's blood sugar (glucose) levels are slightly higher than the normal range, but not high enough for a true diagnosis of diabetes. People with prediabetes have a significant risk of developing full-blown diabetes. In the Diabetes Prevention Program study, about 11% of people with prediabetes developed type II diabetes each year during the three year follow-up time of the study. Importantly, people with prediabetes generally have no symptoms of the condition. Testing for Pre Diabetes Doctors generally use one of two different blood tests to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes. One is called the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG) in which a person's blood glucose level is measured first thing in the morning before breakfast. The normal fasting blood glucose level is below 100 mg/dl. A person with prediabetes has a fasting blood glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dl. If the fasting blood glucose level is to 126 mg/dl or above, a person is considered to have diabetes. The second test used in the diagnosis of diabetes is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), although this test is no longer commonly used as in the past. This test may be used to diagnose gestational diabetes in pregnant women. In this test, a person's blood glucose is measured in the morning after fasting overnight and again two hours after drinking a glucose-rich beverage. The normal value for blood glucose Continue reading >>

Cdc's New 'pre-diabetes' Campaign Is Misguided, Mayo Physician Says

Cdc's New 'pre-diabetes' Campaign Is Misguided, Mayo Physician Says

In January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Medical Association, in partnership with the Ad Council, launched a new campaign to increase the public’s awareness of pre-diabetes. According to the CDC, some 86 million American adults may have pre-diabetes, which the agency says is characterized by “blood glucose (sugar) levels [that] are higher than normal — but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.” “Pre-diabetes increases the risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke,” says Ann Albright, director of the CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, in a video released on MedScape with the campaign. Indeed, Albright says that without treatment — “a structured lifestyle program that provides real-life support for healthful eating, increasing physical activity, and enhancing problem-solving skills” — some 15 to 30 percent of people with pre-diabetes will go on to develop full-fledged diabetes within five years. The campaign is encouraging people to talk with their physicians about getting tested for pre-diabetes. Diabetes is certainly a serious disease. It can lead to disabling and sometimes life-threatening health complications, including heart disease, kidney failure, blindness and amputations. More than 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have the disease — a number that has increased four-fold over the past three decades. But many experts are not convinced that pre-diabetes, a term coined by the ADA a few years ago and used almost exclusively in the United States, deserves the attention it’s receiving in the new public awareness campaign. In fact, they don’t think pre-diabetes is a medical condition at all, but rather “an artif Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes?

What Is Prediabetes?

Prediabetes is a wake-up call that you’re on the path to diabetes. But it’s not too late to turn things around. If you have it (like 86 million other Americans), your blood sugar (glucose) level is higher than it should be, but not in the diabetes range. People used to call it "borderline" diabetes. Normally, your body makes a hormone called insulin to help control your blood sugar. When you have prediabetes, that system doesn't work as well as it should. You might not be able to make enough insulin after eating, or your body might not respond to insulin properly. Prediabetes makes you more likely to get heart disease or have a stroke. But you can take action to lower those risks. Your doctor will give you one of three simple blood tests: Fasting plasma glucose test. You won't eat for 8 hours before taking this blood test. The results are: Normal if your blood sugar is less than 100 Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 100-125 Diabetes if your blood sugar is 126 or higher Oral glucose tolerance test. First, you'll take the fasting glucose test. Then you'll drink a sugary solution. Two hours after that, you'll take another blood test. The results are: Normal if your blood sugar is less than 140 after the second test Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 140-199 after the second test Diabetes if your blood sugar is 200 or higher after the second test Hemoglobin A1C (or average blood sugar) test. This blood test shows your average blood sugar level for the past 2 to 3 months. Doctors can use it to diagnose prediabetes or diabetes or, if you already know you have diabetes, it helps show whether it's under control. The results are: Normal: 5.6% or less Prediabetes: 5.7 to 6.4% Diabetes: 6.5% or above You may need to take the test again to confirm the results. Lifestyle change Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

5 Signs Of Prediabetes That Are Easy To Overlook

5 Signs Of Prediabetes That Are Easy To Overlook

Prediabetes is a new word for a fast-rising problem around the world. It’s a diagnosis made when your blood glucose is higher than it should be, but not high enough to be called diabetes. “Prediabetes is this kind of grey zone,” says Dr. Stewart Harris, a professor in family medicine at the University of Western Ontario’s Schulich School of Medicine who specializes in diabetes. “Your body is metabolically losing the ability to manage blood sugars after eating, and they start to creep up.” As many as six million Canadians can be considered to have prediabetes. The trouble is, many of them don’t know it. Prediabetes often has no symptoms at all. Yet if these people don’t take steps to control their blood sugar now, a diagnosis of diabetes within the next few years is highly likely. Could you have prediabetes? Here are five signs that you might. 1. You’re in a high-risk group for type 2 diabetes. Researchers have identified certain people who are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. These folks are also at risk for prediabetes. If you have a family history of diabetes or an Aboriginal, South Asian, Asian, African or Hispanic background, you’re at higher risk for prediabetes. Other risk factors include being older than 45 and having a sedentary lifestyle. 2. You have a health problem linked to prediabetes. The condition of your body can sometimes point to high blood sugar. If you’re overweight or obese’that is, if your body mass index is over 25’you could have prediabetes. Same goes for having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease or polycystic ovarian syndrome. If you had gestational diabetes, or diabetes diagnosed when you were pregnant, you could develop prediabetes after the baby’s born. 3. You have classic diabetes symptoms Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes describes a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, although not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes has no signs or symptoms. People with pre-diabetes have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular (heart and circulation) disease. Two million Australians have pre-diabetes and are at high-risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Without sustained lifestyle changes, including healthy eating, increased activity and losing weight, approximately one in three people with pre-diabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes. There are two pre-diabetes conditions: Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is where blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) is where blood glucose levels are escalated in the fasting state but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. It is possible to have both Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG) and Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT) Risk factors for pre-diabetes are similar to those for type 2 diabetes which are: Being overweight – especially those who have excess weight around the waistline (ie: more than 94cm for men and more than 80cm for women). Being physically inactive. Having high triglycerides and low HDL-C (good cholesterol) and/or high total cholesterol. Having high blood pressure. Having a family history of type 2 diabetes and/or heart disease. Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome*. Women who have had diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) or given birth to a big baby (more than 4.5kgs). Those from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander background. Those from certain ethnic backgrounds such as the Pacific Islands, Asia and the Indian sub-continent. For more information refer to Continue reading >>

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

If you have not been diagnosed with diabetes but suspect you might have something wrong with your blood sugar, there is a simple way to find out. What you need to do is to test your blood sugar after you have eaten a meal that contains about sixty grams of carbohydrates. You can ask your doctor to test your blood sugar in the office if you have an appointment that takes place an hour or two after you've eaten or, if this isn't an option, you can use an inexpensive blood sugar meter to test your post-meal blood sugar yourself at home. You do not need a prescription to buy the meter or strips. One advantage of testing yourself at home is that with self-testing you do not run the risk of having a "diabetes" diagnosis written into your medical records which might make it impossible for you to buy health or life insurance. To run a post-meal blood sugar test do following: Borrow a family member's meter or buy an inexpensive meter and strips at the drug store or Walmart. The Walmart Relion meter store brand meters sold at pharamcies like CVS, Walgreens, etc are usually the least expensive. Some meters come with 10 free strips. Check to see if the meter you have bought includes strips. If it doesn't, buy the smallest package size available. Strips do not keep for very long once opened, so don't buy more than you need for a couple tests. Familiarize yourself with the instructions that came with your meter so that you know how to run a blood test. Practice a few times before you run your official test. Each meter is different. Be sure you understand how yours works. The first thing in the morning after you wake up but before you have eaten anything, test your blood sugar. Write down the result. This is your "fasting blood sugar." Now eat something containing at 60 - 70 grams of Continue reading >>

How Ironic, I Am Pre-diabetic

How Ironic, I Am Pre-diabetic

Sometimes in life you get a wake up call that hits too close to home ... and work. “Your blood sugar is 106 and if you don’t make changes at some point you will have diabetes,” words from my doctor that served as an enormous wake up call. According to the American Diabetes Association, I am not alone, with 79 million people in the U.S. with pre-diabetes and an additional 7 million who have diabetes, but are still undiagnosed. In my world this news comes with a lot of background knowledge. As a member of the Wound Care Advantage team, I am acutely aware of the dangerous slope from diabetes and obesity to non-healing wounds. A rebirth in caring about my health. Getting the news that I was going to be a father was a life-changing event for me. I started thinking about my health and living as long as I can. I headed to my family physician for a full physical after a four-year absence from seeing any doctors. It was during this visit that I learned how truly naïve I was to the danger and reality of diabetes. Despite witnessing my own father fighting type-1 Diabetes for nearly his entire life and more than five years of working in the wound care industry, I still believed it would never happen to me. After all, I ate — for the most part — fairly well. I even occasionally made a kale smoothie and posted it on Instagram. So imagine my surprise as my doctor was going over my test results and said my fasting blood sugar is 106 and I am in danger of becoming a diabetic! If I thought this way, how many other Americans do as well? What qualifies me as pre-diabetic?. To get a better handle on this news, I went straight to the experts and reached out to some new friends at some of the biggest diabetic organizations on the planet. I spoke with John Crowley, director of commu Continue reading >>

More in diabetes