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What Does Glucose Intolerance Mean

Medical Definition Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Medical Definition Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Amputations. INVOKANA® may increase your risk of lower-limb amputations. Amputations mainly involve removal of the toe or part of the foot; however, amputations involving the leg, below and above the knee, have also occurred. Some people had more than one amputation, some on both sides of the body. Youmay be at a higher risk of lower-limb amputation if you: have a history of amputation, have heart disease or are at risk for heart disease, have had blocked or narrowed blood vessels (usually in leg), have damage to the nerves (neuropathy)in the leg, or have had diabetic foot ulcers or sores. Call your doctor right away if you have new pain or tenderness, any sores, ulcers, or infections in your leg or foot. Your doctor may decide to stop your INVOKANA®. Talk to your doctor about proper foot care Dehydration. INVOKANA® can cause some people to become dehydrated (the loss of too much body water), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). Youmay be at higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure (including diuretics [water pills]), are on a low sodium (salt) diet, have kidney problems, or are 65 years of age orolder Yeast infection of the penis (balanitis or balanoposthitis).Men who take INVOKANA® may get a yeast infection of the skin around the penis. Symptoms include: redness, itching, or swelling of the penis; rash of the penis; foul-smelling discharge from the penis;or pain in the skin around penis Before you take INVOKANA®, tell your doctor if you have a history of amputation; heart disease or are at risk for heart disease; blocked or narrowed blood vessels (usually in leg); damage to the nerves (neuropathy) of your leg; diabetic f Continue reading >>

What Does Glucose Intolerance Mean? Prediabetes? Type 2 Diabetes?

What Does Glucose Intolerance Mean? Prediabetes? Type 2 Diabetes?

What Does Glucose Intolerance Mean? Prediabetes? Type 2 Diabetes? You just found out you have Glucose Intolerance. What Does Glucose Intolerance Mean? Does this mean you have Prediabetes or even Type 2 Diabetes?Read on to find out including test levels for both Prediabetes & Type 2and how to know if you should be tested Glucose Intoleranceis higher than normal blood sugar levels, also known ashyperglycemia.Normally sugar is taken from your blood and sent to your cellswith Glucose Intolerance too much sugar stays in your blood causing your blood vessels to become inflamed. This problem is very serious as glucose intolerance can contribute to or increase your risk for: Fasting Blood Glucose Test (blood test after fasting) Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (drinking the sugary liquid) Hemoglobin A1C Test (blood test that measures how much your red blood cells are coated with sugar, no fasting necessary) Above normal levels mean you have Glucose Intolerance which most people call Prediabetes or Type 2 Diabetes depending on your test results. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test: 140 mg/dl 199 mg/dl Type 2 Diabetes(U.S. testing guidelines) Fasting Blood Glucose: 126 mg/dl or higher Oral Glucose Tolerance Test: 200 mg/dl or higher Do You Need To Be Tested for Glucose Intolerance? Obviously, you cant take these tests without a doctors permission . If you think you might have Prediabetes or even Type 2 Diabetesask to be tested! Knowing where you stand makes all the difference. You cant fix something if you dont know its broken. If you have any of the below, ask to be test right away for Glucose Intolerance! Tingling Or Numbness In Your Fingers, Hands Or Feet Continue reading >>

9 Symptoms Of Glucose Intolerance You Should Be Aware Of

9 Symptoms Of Glucose Intolerance You Should Be Aware Of

Could you be glucose intolerant? You’ll be surprised at some people who are without even realizing it. They suffer the common symptoms without ever thinking about them, believing them to be normal parts of life. It’s only when they suffer a major health problem that they realize those symptoms have never been good. You need to put your health first. It’s essential that you look out for common symptoms that indicate there is a major problem. These symptoms can be minor at first, but they will get worse over time. When it comes to glucose intolerance, you want to be aware of the following nine symptoms. Seek medical attention if you do have them. Glucose Intolerance Is Known as Prediabetes Most people right now will wonder what glucose intolerance is. Your body naturally creates this, so how could you possibly be intolerant to it? The medical term is impaired glucose intolerance (IGT) or prediabetes. It’s a term given to individuals who are at a higher than normal risk of developing diabetes at some point, especially if they continue with the current lifestyle that they have. This isn’t just about your diet, though. It could be that your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or that the normal hepatic glucose output is higher than it should be. Some doctors have linked the intolerance to the poor disposal of blood sugar from the system. Doctors wanted to remove the social stigma of having diabetes. At the same time, they needed a way to note if someone was a higher risk, as well as note those who were at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Now that you know more about what glucose intolerance is, it’s time to note the main symptoms. This will help you get an official diagnosis and help to avoid this issue turning into full-blown diabetes. Feeli Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance (igt)

Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance (igt)

People with IGT have blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to say they have diabetes. This condition is diagnosed using the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). After a fast of 8 to12 hours, a person's blood glucose is measured before and 2 hours after drinking a glucose-containing solution. In normal glucose tolerance, blood glucose rises no higher than 140 mg/dl 2 hours after the drink. In impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), the 2-hour blood glucose is between 140 and 199 mg/dl. If the 2-hour blood glucose rises to 200 mg/dl or above, a person has diabetes. How does the fasting blood glucose test differ from the oral glucose tolerance test? In the fasting blood glucose test, a person's blood glucose is measured after a fast of 8 to 12 hours: A person with normal blood glucose has a blood glucose level below 100. A person with impaired fasting glucose has a blood glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dl. If the fasting blood glucose level rises to126 mg/dl or above, a person has diabetes. The OGTT includes measures of blood glucose levels after a fast and after a glucose challenge. In 1997, an American Diabetes Association (ADA) expert panel recommended that doctors use the fasting blood glucose test to screen their patients for diabetes because the test is easier and less costly than the OGTT. Though the fasting glucose test detects most diabetes cases, the OGTT is more sensitive in identifying people with blood glucose problems that may first appear only after a glucose challenge. For a person with IGT, what is the risk of developing type 2 diabetes? As few as 1 to as many as 10 of every 100 persons with IGT will develop diabetes per year. The risk of getting diabetes rises as people become more overweight and more sedentary, have a stronge Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test measures how well your body’s cells are able to absorb glucose, or sugar, after you ingest a given amount of sugar. Doctors use fasting blood sugar levels and hemoglobin A1c values to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and prediabetes. A glucose tolerance test can also be used. Doctors primarily use a glucose tolerance test to diagnose gestational diabetes. Doctors often diagnose type 1 diabetes quickly because it usually develops quickly and involves high blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, often develops over years. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and it usually develops during adulthood. Gestational diabetes occurs when a pregnant woman who doesn’t have diabetes before pregnancy has high blood sugar levels as a result of the pregnancy. The American Diabetes Association estimates that gestational diabetes occurs in 9.2 percent of pregnancies. Doctors should screen all women for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause pregnancy complications, so early detection and prompt treatment are important. If you’re pregnant, your doctor will usually recommend this test between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy. Your doctor may also recommend that you have this test earlier if you’re having the symptoms of prediabetes or diabetes. Preparing for the glucose tolerance test involves the following: Continue to eat a normal diet in the days leading up to the test. Consult with your doctor about any medications you’re currently taking. Some medications, such as corticosteroids, beta-blockers, diuretics, and antidepressants, can interfere with the results. Abstain from food for at least eight hours before the scheduled test. You may drink water, but avoid Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy And Future Risk Of Pre-diabetes Or Diabetes

Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy And Future Risk Of Pre-diabetes Or Diabetes

Glucose Intolerance in Pregnancy and Future Risk of Pre-Diabetes or Diabetes 1Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 4Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 3Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 4Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Corresponding author: Dr. Ravi Retnakaran, [email protected] Received 2008 May 28; Accepted 2008 Jun 25. Copyright 2008, American Diabetes Association Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. OBJECTIVEThe purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that any degree of abnormal glucose homeostasis detected on antepartum screening for gestat Continue reading >>

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Your blood sugar level can give your doctor important clues about your health, and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) shows how well your body handles sugar from foods. It can tell whether you are at risk for diabetes or if you already have it. A shorter version of an OGTT checks for diabetes during pregnancy. Normally when you eat, your blood sugar rises. Your pancreas, a long gland deep in the belly, releases a hormone called insulin. It helps move sugar from your blood into your cells for energy and storage. Then your blood sugar goes back down to normal. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body uses insulin poorly. Glucose builds up in your blood. This excess sugar can damage blood vessels around your body. Diabetes can lead to heart disease, nerve damage, eye disease, and kidney damage. You might need an oral glucose tolerance test if you: Have a close family member with diabetes Have high triglycerides (a type of fat in your blood) Have polycystic ovarian syndrome (which causes menstrual problems) Delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds A shorter version of this test is done between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy to see whether you have gestational diabetes. It's called the oral glucose challenge test. To get an accurate result on the OGTT, eat about 150 grams of carbohydrates each day for 3 days before the test. Don't eat or drink anything except water after about 10 o’clock the night before. You don't need to do any special prep before the pregnancy glucose challenge test. You can eat in the morning. Just avoid foods with a lot of sugar, such as doughnuts or orange juice. You'll get the OGTT at your doctor's office, a clinic, hospital, or lab. Here’s what happens: A nurse or doctor will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm to test your s Continue reading >>

Perceived Symptoms In People Living With Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Perceived Symptoms In People Living With Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Copyright © 2011 Susanne Andersson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract The aim of the study was to identify symptoms in people with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and describe their experiences of living with the symptoms which they related to their condition. Twenty-one participants, from a cross-sectional population-based study, diagnosed as having IGT, were invited for an interview. The interviews were analyzed in two phases by means of a manifest and latent content analysis. The narratives included seven categories of symptoms (and more than 25 different symptoms) presented by the respondents. This study shows that symptoms such as the patient's own interpretation of different perceptions in the body must be considered, as well as signs and/or objective observations. Symptoms ought to be seen as complementary components in the health encounter and health conversation. The results of this study indicate that health professionals should increase their awareness of the balance between the implicit and the explicit bodily sensations that individuals communicate. Further studies are needed. 1. Introduction Living with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) means living with an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and is preceded by a long period without symptoms, which is why IGT often remains undetected for a long period of time [1, 2]. At the same time, the prevalence of T2DM is predicted to increase in future decades [3–5], thus emphasizing the importance of identifying additional aspects of understanding what it means to live with IGT. The diagnosis of Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

In pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range. Whilst this raised glucose level is not so high that you have diabetes, you are at increased risk of developing diabetes when you have pre-diabetes. You are also at increased risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke (cardiovascular diseases). If pre-diabetes is treated, it can help to prevent the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The most effective treatment is lifestyle changes, including eating a healthy balanced diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and doing regular physical activity. What is pre-diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If you have pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range but it is not so high that you have diabetes. However, if y Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Igt

Insulin Resistance And Igt

Diabetes isn't simple. Although every diabetic, by definition, has difficulty with insulin supply and glucose metabolization, there are a number of different ways to arrive there. You may encounter the terms insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. What are they? Insulin resistance is the body's inability to correctly utilize its normal (endogenous) insulin supply, even though that insulin is present in sufficient volume. IGT, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, once called "borderline diabetes," or "subclinical" diabetes, means your numbers are still short of the diabetic threshold, but exhibit abnormalities in the processing of blood sugar. If a person has insulin resistance, the body is incorrectly using the hormone. Let's track it: You're hungry. You eat. Blood sugar levels rise...all strictly normal. Remembering insulin is necessary for that last stage of digestion—moving the glucose from the blood into the cells—your body puts out insulin, to do its job. But, for whatever reason, the body does not fully respond to the insulin, and the sugars stay in the blood. The pancreas senses the problem, and puts out MORE insulin, trying mightily to bring down those blood sugars. It isn't subtle about it, and, in the early stages, can over-produce, and down you can go into hypoglycemia. This is IGT, Impaired Glucose Tolerance. The overworked pancreas can, and often does, "go on strike." Perhaps 50% of all individuals with IGT go on to full-blown diabetes. In time, insulin output slows below insulin needs, and sugars rise into the hyperglycemic range, where they stay, until medication (sulfonylureas, Metformin, Rezulin) brings them back down. They have progressed to type 2 diabetes. If you have not been diagnosed with diabetes, how do you know if you are insulin resistan Continue reading >>

What Is The Differance Between Glucose Intolerant & Diabetes?

What Is The Differance Between Glucose Intolerant & Diabetes?

HealthBoards > Immune & Autoimmune > Diabetes > What is the differance between Glucose Intolerant & Diabetes? What is the differance between Glucose Intolerant & Diabetes? What is the differance between Glucose Intolerant & Diabetes? Can someone please tell me what is the differance between being Glucose Intollerant & having Diabetes? My Doctor told me I was Glucose Intollerant after spending a week in the hospital due to what they thought was a heart attack.Turned out to be stress & a mild heart attack,but while I was there they noticed my blood sugar was higher than normal & did alot of tests & bloodwork.They sent me to another Doctor to be tested for Diabetes after i was released from the hospital & that Doctor told me I was Glucose Intollerant. He said I needed to watch what I eat & be retested every 3 months on a regular basis,to keep an eye on it. P.s. I have had symptoms of Diabeties such as: fatigue,thirsty alot, & frequent urination. But also, I have problems with my vision lately & a pain in my left eye (Dont know if thats related or not) The difference is just a matter of degree in most cases. Being glucose intolerant (often called impaired glucose tolerance) is generally a sign of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance can progress to full blown Diabetes (Type II) if not treated with diet and lifestyle changes and/or medication. Normal fasting bloodsugars are generally in the range of 70 to 90 mg/dl. At around 110 mg/dl, Impaired Glucose Tolerance is usually the diagnosis. At >125 mg/dl, Diabetes is the usual diagnosis. The tragedy of science is the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact. T H Huxley well my Doctor said that mine has been anywhere between 113-137 (after fasting).So does that mean that I am borderline diabetic? Is that why he is Continue reading >>

Daily Diet For Glucose Intolerance

Daily Diet For Glucose Intolerance

Diabetic testing blood sugar.Photo Credit: Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images Michelle Cimino is a writer of nutrition- and food-related articles. She authors a popular food blog and holds a Master of Science in nutrition and public health from Columbia University. Glucose intolerance is a medical condition that predisposes you to developing diabetes in the future. But this does not mean that diabetes is definite. Simple dietary changes that maintain proper blood sugar control can help you avoid a lifetime of blood sugar monitoring and diabetic complications. Glucose is a simple sugar.Photo Credit: peredniankina/iStock/Getty Images Glucose is a simple sugar that acts as the primary fuel source for your body. Without glucose, your body is forced to utilize muscle and fat instead. While that may seem like an instant weight loss strategy, this alternate energy producing pathway actually results in the accumulation of acidic ketones from the breakdown of fat. When these ketones become too abundant in your blood, the body reacts by shutting down into a coma. For optimal health and proper function, your body must utilize glucose to meet its energy needs. Blood sugar reading.Photo Credit: Tolga Sipahi/iStock/Getty Images Glucose intolerance or impaired glucose tolerance is a pre-diabetic condition that makes it difficult for your body's cells to fully and efficiently utilize glucose as a fuel. This condition predisposes individuals to developing Type 2 diabetes because it results in hyperglycemia or an abnormal accumulation of glucose in the blood. Controlling your blood glucose levels by preventing high blood sugars and keeping them within the normal range can reduce your risk of developing diabetes if you have been diagnosed with glucose intolerance. Sweet potatoes.Photo Cred Continue reading >>

Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose: Summary - Ahrq Evidence Report Summaries - Ncbi Bookshelf

Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose: Summary - Ahrq Evidence Report Summaries - Ncbi Bookshelf

NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. AHRQ Evidence Report Summaries. Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); 1998-2005. This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date. This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date. 128Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment of Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Impaired Fasting Glucose: Summary PL Santaguida, C Balion, D Hunt, K Morrison, H Gerstein, P Raina, L Booker, and H Yazdi. Diabetes mellitus (DM) and its associated disease outcomes are a growing concern worldwide. The current global prevalence of DM for all ages has been estimated at 2.8 percent and is predicted to reach 4.4 percent by 2030. 1 There is intense interest in identifying and treating risk factors that may prevent the onset of this disease and minimize morbidity. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are the intermediate metabolic states between normal and diabetic glucose homeostasis. These conditions are thought to be the precursors of DM, but the progression to overt disease is not straight-forward. The risk for both macrovascular and microvascular complications increases across the distribution of blood glucose concentrations well below the overt DM, and the risk is more strongly associated with post-challenge hyperglycemia than fasting glucose levels. However, it is unclear whether this glucose effect is independent of classical risk factors, such as blood pressure and lipids, or occurs due to abnormalities of other metabolites, such as free fatty acids. The goal of this systematic review is to evaluate the state of the evidence in the areas of the diagnosis Continue reading >>

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a pre-diabetic state of hyperglycemia that is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology. IGT may precede type 2 diabetes mellitus by many years. IGT is also a risk factor for mortality.[1] Diagnosis[edit] According to the criteria of the World Health Organization and the American Diabetes Association, impaired glucose tolerance is defined as:[2][3][4] two-hour glucose levels of 140 to 199 mg per dL (7.8 to 11.0 mmol/l) on the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. A patient is said to be under the condition of IGT when he/she has an intermediately raised glucose level after 2 hours, but less than the level that would qualify for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The fasting glucose may be either normal or mildly elevated. From 10 to 15 percent of adults in the United States have impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose.[5] Treatment[edit] Main article: Prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2 The risk of progression to diabetes and development of cardiovascular disease is greater than for impaired fasting glucose.[6] Although some drugs can delay the onset of diabetes, lifestyle modifications play a greater role in the prevention of diabetes.[5][7] Patients identified as having an IGT may be able to prevent diabetes through a combination of increased exercise and reduction of body weight.[5] "Drug therapy can be considered when aggressive lifestyle interventions are unsuccessful."[5] See also[edit] Glucose tolerance test Impaired fasting glucose [edit] Further reading[edit] Melanie J Davies; I Peter Gray (3 February 1996). "Impaired glucose tolerance". British Medical Journal. 312 (7026): 264–65. doi:10.1136/bmj.312.7026.264. PMC 2349870 . PMID 8611769. – Editorial review Nathan, DM; Davidson Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance

Glucose Intolerance

Tweet Glucose intolerance is term for metabolic conditions which result in high blood glucose levels. Pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance are all conditions which fall under the term glucose intolerant. Glucose intolerance is defined by the World Health Organisation as: A blood sugar level of 6.0 mmol/l or above whilst fasting A blood glucose level of over 7.8 mmol/l 2 hours after consuming 75g of glucose The figures above are based on the assumption that people are not taking blood glucose lowering medication. The symptoms of glucose intolerance may not be so easy to spot. The symptoms may include: Feeling thirsty Being tired or lethargic Needing to urinate more than usual Itchiness around the genitals People with impaired glucose tolerance are more likely to notice symptoms after meals. Whereas people with impaired fasting glucose will notice the symptoms through other parts of the day including during the night. Glucose intolerance will often be diagnosed by a fasting plasma glucose test or by a glucose tolerance test. A plasma glucose test is when a blood sample is taken, usually from your arm, and the blood glucose levels measured. A glucose tolerance test involves taking a set amount of glucose orally, usually 75g of glucose, and then taking your blood glucose levels over regular periods of time over the next few hours. Glucose intolerance can be treated through diet and lifestyle changes or with assistance from anti-diabetic medication, such as tablets and/or insulin. Your doctor will measure your long term blood glucose control via an HbA1c test. Your doctor may also prescribe you with blood glucose testing supplies to allow you to make diet choices and to indentify and prevent high or low blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

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