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What Does Diabetic Skin Rash Look Like?

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

1 / 11 Are You Suffering From a Diabetes-Related Skin Complication? About a third of people with diabetes will develop skin problems at some point. In fact, some skin issues can be warning signs of diabetes. The good news is that most skin conditions can be treated easily if they’re caught early. Keeping proper control of your blood sugar (glucose) can prevent skin problems and many other diabetes symptoms from happening in the first place. “For the most part, control of diabetes can help with related skin issues,” says Justin Ko, MD, the medical director and service chief of medical dermatology at Stanford Health Care, in Redwood City, California. “I’m always adamant that my diabetic patients take aggressive care of their skin and health in general. For the skin, moisturization, checking feet and legs daily for any blisters, sores, and skin breaks (especially between the toes), and nail care is extremely important. Nail and foot fungus can lead to skin cracks and breaks, allowing bacteria to enter and cause infection.” Continue reading >>

Skin Rashes

Skin Rashes

What is a rash? A rash is defined as a change in the skin’s appearance, which may involve alternations in texture (eg rough or smooth) and/or colour. The skin may also become itchy, warmer, dry, cracked, blistered, lumpy or painful. Depending on where the rash is located, other symptoms you are experiencing, what you have been exposed to and any family history, there are many causes for a rash. It is therefore very important to be aware of where the rash initially arises from, how it changes or spreads and recognize symptoms and signs that suggest that you should seek medical attention immediately. These details and other important issues such as common causes, associated medical conditions and basic management of rashes will be discussed below. Rashes can be divided into acute (short term) and chronic (longer term) causes. Within the acute group, they can be blanching (disappearing when pressed) or non-blanching. In the chronic group, it is useful to divide them into itchy and non-itchy causes. There are also a number of medical conditions which can be associated with rashes. Common causes of rashes There are many causes of rashes. It is useful to divide the common causes into two groups: those that develop quickly (acute) vs those that have been present for a longer period of time (chronic). Acute skin rashes Blanching rash (Rash disappears when pressed) Viral infections Skin rashes seen depend on the virus involved. In chicken pox, the varicella zoster virus produces groups of many vesicles, each like a drop of water on a reddened base on the trunk, face, extremities and inside of the mouth. The measles virus produces a rash with flattened and raised areas, starting on the face and progressing to involve the trunk and limbs. White spots like salt grains on a red ba Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

The symptoms are not always obvious, and many people could be suffering with the condition for years before they learn they have it. Every week 4,500 people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes across the UK. However, experts warn thousands could be living with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The condition, which can be caused by being overweight and poor diet can cause blindness, limbs to be amputated - every week diabetes causes 150 amputations - and even kidney failure. It has even been linked to a reduce life expectancy if the condition it not managed well. People also need to ensure they look after their feet properly as high levels of blood glucose can cause foot problems. This can stop nerves working so people might not feel when they have cut their feet or burned themselves. The main symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Urinating more often than usual - particularly at night Excessive urination can be triggered by excess glucose in the blood which interferes with the kidney’s ability to concentrate urine. Feeling thirsty Kidneys have to work harder in people with type 2 diabetes. Puldisia is the term given to excessive thirst. Diabetes.co.uk said: “If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.” If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body Feeling tired Feeling tired could be a symptom of many conditions - but it can be caused in people who have low blood sugar. Itching around the penis or vagina Thrush - a yeast infection - tends to affect warm, moist areas of the body such as the vagina, penis, mouth and certain areas Continue reading >>

Itching

Itching

Itching can be very uncomfortable. It is one of the most common reasons people see doctors who specialize in skin disorders (dermatologists). Itching makes people want to scratch. Scratching temporarily relieves itching but can damage the skin, sometimes resulting in more itching or infection. Over time, the skin can become thick and scaly. Causes of Itching Itching can result from Skin disorders The most common causes of itching are skin disorders: Insect bites and parasitic skin infections, such as scabies, can cause intense itching. Systemic disorders Systemic causes are less common than skin disorders but are more likely if there is no visible skin problem. Some of the more common systemic causesare Less common systemic causes include hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid gland), hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid gland), diabetes, iron deficiency, dermatitis herpetiformis, and polycythemia vera (a cancerous overproduction of red blood cells). Some disorders that affect the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis, may cause itching. Some people who have mental disorders may have itching for which no physical cause can be found. This type of itching is called psychogenic itching. Evaluation of Itching Not every episode of itching requires immediate evaluation by a doctor. The following information can help people decide whether a doctor's evaluation is needed and help them know what to expect during the evaluation. Most conditions causing itching are not serious. When to see a doctor People who have weight loss, fatigue, or night sweats should see a doctor as soon as convenient, probably within a week or so. People with any of the other warning signs or with severe itching should probably see a doctor immediately or as soon as possible. What the doctor does D Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.oprah.com something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.202.47.20 on 2018-01-04 13:09:16 UTC. Trace: d482896f-1906-49f5-a857-ced87f660106 via 6b8072bc-3d82-46de-bca7-0b3d33262e04 Continue reading >>

Got A Rash Or Other Skin Problem? It Could Be An Ailment You’d Never Expect To Affect Your Skin

Got A Rash Or Other Skin Problem? It Could Be An Ailment You’d Never Expect To Affect Your Skin

We all know that we should keep an eye on moles and any other skin changes that might be a sign of skin cancer. But there’s another reason to look closely at your skin: It can point to—or sometimes even predict—internal diseases that you might not be aware of. Many internal diseases are accompanied by skin symptoms. The yellowish skin tint (jaundice) caused by hepatitis is a common one—but there are other serious health problems that most people don’t associate with skin changes… Skin symptoms: Rash or pimplelike eruptions (sometimes containing pus) under the breasts, between the buttocks or in other skinfolds. Possible underlying cause: Candidiasis, a fungal infection that commonly affects people with diabetes. This infection also can lead to whitish spots on the tongue or inner cheeks. Candidiasis of the skin or mucous membranes that is chronic or difficult to control can be a red flag for poor blood sugar control—and it can occur in patients who haven’t yet been diagnosed with diabetes. People with poor blood sugar control often have impaired immunity, increasing their risk for infections such as Candidiasis. Next step: Most Candidiasis infections are easily treated with topical antifungal preparations. People with persistent/severe cases may need an oral medication, such as over-the-counter (OTC) clotrimazole (Lotrimin) or prescription fluconazole (Diflucan). Also: Dark patches of skin that feel velvety and thicker than normal (especially on the neck and under the arms) could be due to acanthosis nigricans, a sign of insulin resistance, a condition that often precedes diabetes. The skin may also smell bad or itch. Acanthosis nigricans often will improve without treatment when you get your blood sugar under control, so get tested for insulin resistanc Continue reading >>

Underarm (armpit) Rash – Pictures, Symptoms, Causes And Treatment

Underarm (armpit) Rash – Pictures, Symptoms, Causes And Treatment

Scratching your underarm in public is nothing short of an embarrassment. But you cannot really help it if you are suffering from an underarm rash. Read on to know all about Underarm Rashes – their symptoms, causes and treatment. What is an Underarm Rash? Picture 1 – Underarm Rash Source – sparkpeople An Underarm Rash, as the name suggests, is a rash that develops on the skin of the armpit. The condition is also known as Armpit rash. It is an eruption that causes irritation and itchiness. It is a very common condition that appears in many people in the US. Underarm Rash Symptoms and Signs Underarm skin rashes are characterized by a number of symptoms. These include : Eruptions As aforementioned, a lot of bumps arise on the skin of the armpits. The presence of these lumps are normally felt when the sufferer tries to shave the hairs of the underarm or wears tight fitting clothes. Tight apparels cause a friction between clothes and Underarm Rash and pain arises as a result. Itching There is itching in the affected area of the armpit. Sufferers experience a constant itching sensation which makes them scratch the underarm region for relief. Scratching provides temporary relief from itchy Underarm Rash. But it can aggravate the underarm rash pain. Irritation Sufferers also feel an irritating, uncomfortable sensation in the affected skin region. Due to constant itching of Underarm Rash burning sensation may also be experienced. Underarm Rash Causes Some of the main causes behind the appearance of Underarm Rash lumps include : Allergies Armpit rashes can arise due to some product that causes skin allergy in the suffering person. Deodorants are one of the biggest factors behind underarm allergies. In many people with Underarm Rash deodorant is found to be the causative agen Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes can’t be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus, or “sugar diabetes,” is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy. To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process. The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the body’s cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things: • Glucose: essential fuel for the body’s cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body. • Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a “gatekeeper” that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel. What is diabetes? With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isn’t working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms: • Insulin-deficiency diabetes—This is when the dog’s body isn’t producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. • Insulin-resistance diabetes—This is when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but the dog’s body isn’t utilizing the insulin as it should. The ce Continue reading >>

Ankle Rash

Ankle Rash

What is an ankle rash? An ankle rash is an inflammatory reaction of the skin on the ankles. Rashes on the ankle can be caused by a wide variety of mild to serious diseases, disorders and conditions. Ankle rashes can affect a small to large area of one or both ankles at a time, and can occur in all age groups and populations. Ankle rashes are often part of larger areas of rash extending to the legs and feet. Ankle rashes vary greatly in appearance, extent and severity depending on the underlying cause. Ankle rashes may or may not be itchy and can be red, white, purple or silver in color. The texture of an ankle rash can be flat, raised, bumpy or scaly and include flaking off or peeling of skin cells. Ankle rashes can also appear as dots, spots or patches, or they may appear to be solid and continuous. An ankle rash can be a sign of a relatively minor condition, such as irritant contact dermatitis caused by exposure to poison ivy or poison oak. A rash on the ankles can also be caused by an allergic reaction to a variety of allergens (allergic contact dermatitis), such as grass. Other causes of ankle rashes include viral infections, autoimmune disorders, and varicose veins. Ankle rashes, along with leg and foot rashes, are also a complication of poorly managed diabetes and peripheral artery disease, which can cause skin changes due to poor blood flow to the extremities. Ankle rashes can have several serious causes. A rash of purple spots on the ankles or other areas can be caused by a potentially serious condition, such as allergic purpura.Any rash that is associated with allergies combined with shortness of breath, wheezing, or swelling of the face, mouth or throat is a symptom of a serious, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. Seek immediate Continue reading >>

Itchy Skin May Be A Warning Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

Itchy Skin May Be A Warning Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

It’s winter, and one of the tell-tale signs of the season often emerges as dry and itchy skin. However, did you know that these symptoms can also be warning signs of Type 2 diabetes? It’s true. Pruritus, which simply means “itching,” is a common symptom of diabetes. While it’s always a good idea to keep your skin moisturized, there are common conditions associated with diabetes that may cause your skin to itch, crack, and peel. There are various underlying causes that can lead to diabetic pruritus. Here are three of the most common chronic conditions. Poor circulation. Individuals who experience itching in the feet and lower legs may be experiencing the result of poor circulation. Poor circulation causes narrowing and hardening of the blood vessels, which, in turn, causes noticeable itching on the surface of the skin. To lessen the severity of the itching, consider taking the following action steps: • Eliminate the use of tobacco • Adopt a regular exercise routine • Keep blood glucose levels in check Fungal infections. Fungal infections are common in individuals with diabetes and are treated with medication. Because different fungi respond to different medications, it’s best to discuss the best course of action to take with your medical care provider. Common symptoms of fungal infections include dry, red, and cracking skin, blisters or breaking down of the skin, and itching. Because high glucose levels in the body enhance the growth of these infections, you’ll want to be diligent about keeping your glucose under control to prevent fungal growth on the skin. Also, keeping your skin clean and dry will go a long way in warding off fungal infections. Fungal infections commonly thrive in these areas on the body: • Armpits • Groin area • Between fing Continue reading >>

What Is Your Skin Trying To Tell You? 9 Ways It Could Reveal Serious Health Problems

What Is Your Skin Trying To Tell You? 9 Ways It Could Reveal Serious Health Problems

Checking for changes in moles has become second nature, with all the worries and warnings over skin cancer . But little changes in your skin, whether a rash, puckering or new bump, can also be an early sign of other diseases lurking in your body. And being able to spot the signs sooner rather than later could make a massive difference. Dr Joanna Gach, consultant dermatologist at Spire Parkway Hospital in Solihull, explains: “The skin is your body’s largest organ so it stands to reason that if things aren’t quite right on the inside, there will be telltale signs on the outside.” While the majority of skin changes can be eczema or skin infections, which are easily diagnosed and treated, some can be signs of something a lot moresinister. If they don’t disappear after a few days or they get worse, it’s always best to see a GP . Dr Gach says: “Hopefully it will be something harmless that can be treated with medication. “But often the more dangerous conditions don’t present with any pain so it’s important to take these things seriously.” So which lumps, bumps, rashes, puckering and marks should you be worried about? And what could they be? Here, Dr Gach talks you through those other changes we should all be watching out for... Skin change: Yellowing of the skin It could be… jaundice Jaundice is something we tend to associate with young babies but it can happen to anyone. It occurs when the liver isn’t clearing the toxins from the body as it should and allows a substance called bilirubin to build up. This will cause the skin to take on a very yellow appearance, which can also be seen in the whites of theeyes. If you notice this, then see your GP who will arrange urine tests and liver function and blood tests. Skin change: Puckering on the breast Altho Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Skin problems are often the first visible signs of diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes can make existing skin problems worse, and also cause new ones. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that affects how your body absorbs glucose (sugar). This happens when the body either rejects insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar level. While it’s most common in adults, some children and adolescents can be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and inactivity. While there is no cure, patients can manage their type 2 diabetes by eating well, exercising, and (in some cases) taking medications recommended by your doctor. Monitoring your blood sugar is also important. Sometimes even maintaining a healthy weight isn’t enough to manage this condition. In some cases, your doctor will determine that medication intervention is needed. Common treatments for type 2 diabetes include: insulin therapy (insulin “shots,” usually reserved for those who don’t do well with oral medications) sulfonylureas (medications that stimulate your pancreas to secrete more insulin) metformin (widely prescribed drug which increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin) DPP-4 inhibitors (medications which reduce blood sugar levels) Causes of Diabetes-Related Skin Problems Long-term type 2 diabetes with hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) tends to reduce blood flow to the skin. It can also cause damage to blood vessels and nerves. Decreased blood circulation can lead to changes in the skin’s collagen. This changes the skin’s texture, appearance, and ability to heal. Damage to the skin cells can Continue reading >>

Diabetes Sores | Symptom No 7 Of 10 Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes Sores | Symptom No 7 Of 10 Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes Sores, Wounds Or Bruises Diabetes sores, wounds and bruises are very common skin changes for a diabetic with type 2 diabetes symptoms. A side-effect of high blood sugar is the reduced ability of your skin to heal properly. You may find that cuts and sores are slow to heal and may become more easily infected. This is due to poor circulation, nerve damage and an impaired immune system. Your skin is your body’s largest organ and is vulnerable to the effects of elevated blood sugar. It is important to recognize that the condition of your skin and the reduced ability to heal can be an indicator for diabetes sores or wounds problems, caused by type 2 symptoms of diabetes. As many as a third of people with type 2 diabetes will have a skin condition related to their disease at some time in their lives. The most common cause of bacterial skin infections in diabetics is the Staphylococcus bacteria, or staph infection. Another common cause is that diabetes affects the flow of the blood. Without proper blood flow, it takes longer for any wound, cut, sore, blister or bruise to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease and puts diabetics at risk not only for frequent healing wounds but also for infections. Skin infections left untreated can fester and worsen to the point that gangrene can develop. This is why you sometimes hear of diabetics having a toe, foot even part of a leg amputated. Research indicates that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper care when problems develop. A type 2 symptom of diabetes can start with something simple like a blister that becomes infected and develops into a sore. Checking your skin regularly is part of a good health care regime. Other type 2 diabetes symptoms, like nerv Continue reading >>

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