diabetestalk.net

What Does Diabetes Urine Smell Like

Sweet-smelling Urine

Sweet-smelling Urine

Why does my urine smell sweet? If you notice a sweet or fruity aroma after urinating, it may be a sign of a more serious medical condition. There are a variety of reasons why your pee smells sweet. The smell is affected because your body is expelling chemicals into your urine. These may be bacteria, glucose, or amino acids. If you notice a sudden onset of sweet-smelling urine, you should contact your doctor immediately. 1. UTI Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are very common infections of the urinary system. For an infection to occur, bacteria must travel up the urethra. The urethra is the tube through which urine flows from your bladder to outside your body. Because of the female anatomy, women are more likely to get UTIs. One of the first signs of an UTI is strong- or sweet-smelling urine. This is because bacteria is dispelled into the urine. Other symptoms are an ongoing urge to pee and a burning sensation when you go. Your doctor can diagnose a UTI using urinalysis. You can purchase pain relievers over the counter that can help with the pain, but only a doctor can prescribe antibiotics that will treat the infection. 2. Hyperglycemia and diabetes Hyperglycemia occurs when you have abnormally high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar is a tell-tale sign of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, you may notice your pee smells sweet or fruity. This is because the body is trying to get rid of the excess blood sugar and is disposing of glucose through your urine. For people who haven’t been diagnosed with diabetes, this symptom can be one of the first signs they have the disease. Diabetes can be diagnosed with urinalysis and blood tests. For those with a diagnosis, it can be a sign they’re mismanaging the condition. Treatment for diabetes depends on the Continue reading >>

What You Can Learn About Your Health By Analyzing The Color And Smell Of Your Urine

What You Can Learn About Your Health By Analyzing The Color And Smell Of Your Urine

By Dr. Mercola Urine can reveal important information about your body's waste elimination process, providing clues about your overall health status. Your kidneys serve to filter excess water and water-soluble wastes out of your blood, getting rid of toxins and things that would otherwise build up and cause you to become ill. Many things — from excess protein and sugar to bacteria and yeast — may make their way into your urine. Instead of ignoring your urine and dashing back to whatever important activity having to pee interrupted, take this golden opportunity to become familiar with your "normal." If you notice changes in the way your urine looks or smells, the cause might be something as benign as what you had for dinner last night, such as beets or asparagus. Or, your astuteness may potentially alert you to a serious condition. If you suspect you have a urinary tract problem, you should consult your physician. One of the first things he or she is likely to do is a urine test. Urine tests have been around for more than 6,000 years1 and are easy, noninvasive tools for quickly assessing your health status2. Minding Your Pees and Cues In your lifetime, your kidneys filter more than one million gallons of water, enough to fill a small lake. Amazingly, one kidney can handle the task perfectly well. In fact, if you lose a kidney, your remaining kidney can increase in size by 50 percent within two months, to take over the job of both.3 Urine is 95 percent water and five percent urea, uric acid, minerals, salts, enzymes, and various substances that would cause problems if allowed to accumulate in your body4. Normal urine is clear and has a straw yellow color, caused by a bile pigment called urobilin. As with your stool, your urine changes color depending on what foods you Continue reading >>

My Urine Smells Sweet!

My Urine Smells Sweet!

My urine is VERY strong in odor, like a sickeningly sweet smell. I check my blood sugar regularly, and it is consistently 85–105. I have never had diabetes. I frequently feel an urgency to urinate, though I do not experience any pain or burning. What could be some causes of the sweet-smelling urine? — Nancy, Arizona Odor is one of the characteristics of urine that can be used to identify and describe medical conditions. Urine odor can also be affected by many foods, medications, and vitamin supplements; asparagus, for instance, has a characteristic effect on urine odor. While most aspects of urinalysis are quantitative and objective, urine has a characteristic smell that varies by species and concentration. Sweet-smelling urine may be the result of either glucose or ketone excesses in the urine. Since you have blood sugars consistently in the 85–105 range, it does not appear that you suffer from diabetes. However, ketonuria could be the cause, which comes from excessive dieting or other rare metabolic conditions. For example, a rare inborn metabolic syndrome called "maple syrup urine" occurs in infants and children, but this condition is associated with neurological problems and would not present itself in adulthood. The sense of urgency that you feel is likely unrelated to the odor of your urine. Of course, all urine parameters are affected by urine volume. Patients with very low fluid intake will have very concentrated urine, which is more likely to exude a particular odor. All unexplained symptoms should be evaluated by a physician. A standard urinalysis is an important first step, along with a careful history and a detailed physical examination. Learn more in the Everyday Health Healthy Living Center. Continue reading >>

Strong-smelling Urine Not Necessarily Cause For Concern

Strong-smelling Urine Not Necessarily Cause For Concern

April 16, 2010 Dear Mayo Clinic: What could be causing my husband's urine to have a very strong odor? Is it cause for concern? He is 74 years old. Answer: Strong-smelling urine has several possible causes. One possibility, diabetes, is a serious medical concern. Other reasons can range from diet — specifically asparagus — to a urinary tract infection, which requires treatment. Causes for strong urine odor include: Urine concentration: It's normal for urine to have a stronger odor first thing in the morning. After a night's sleep, urine is more concentrated and odorous as well as brighter yellow in color. Dehydration also increases urine concentration, causing stronger smelling urine. Have your husband try drinking more water to see if the odor lessens. Hot weather or intense physical activities can contribute to dehydration, too. Concentrated urine, without any other symptoms, generally isn't harmful. Diet: For some people, eating asparagus causes urine to produce a sulfur-like smell. There are no health concerns associated with this odor. Urinary tract infection: Foul-smelling urine is a symptom of a urinary tract infection. Other symptoms are cloudy urine, an urgent need to urinate, or a burning sensation while urinating. The foul smell may be the only symptom of a urinary tract infection. With a persistent foul smell from the urine, your husband should see a physician for a urinalysis and diagnosis. A urinary tract infection needs to be treated with antibiotics to prevent kidney infection and kidney damage. Diabetes: Strong sweet-smelling urine is a sign of advanced diabetes, which can be diagnosed with urinalysis. With advanced diabetes, sugar and ketones, which are normally absent, can accumulate in the urine and create a strong odor. According to the American Continue reading >>

Your Urine And Diabetes: What You Should Know

Your Urine And Diabetes: What You Should Know

Paula’s story Paula came to see mcomplaining that her urine smelt funny. She had been referred to through a friend who had diabetes, and who thought that I might be able to help Paula understand why her pee smelled funny. “My friend told me my urine smells like diabetes,” said Paula. “She said she had that same fruity smell when she got diagnosed.” Paula said her urine smelled like, “Sugar Smacks,” of all things. I suspected that Paula may have Type 2 Diabetes, but we needed to run some lab tests in order to confirm this suspicion We tested her urine using a urinalysis. She had high levels of glucose in her urine. After the urinalysis, we ran a random blood sugar, which detected her levels at 798 mg/dL. With the results at hand, Paula was diagnosed with diabetes. She had to start on insulin seemingly right off the bat, as other oral medications wouldn’t control her diabetes. She had weight to lose, and goals to reach. While she’s a work in progress,her urine no longer smells like Sugar Smacks. What exactly is urine made of ? Urine is a clear, yellow liquid produced by the body to handle the wastes from normal body metabolism. When nitrogenous by-products build up in the blood from cellular metabolism, it must be cleared from the bloodstream. In our bodies, some of our toxic waste from metabolism is excreted through perspiration as urea. The rest is handled by an intricate filter system that makes up the human urinary system. The kidneys work through processes of filtering waste, reabsorption, and tubular secretion. They make urine through this complex filtration process, after which then the urine goes through the ureters, which are tubes to the bladder. Once urine reaches the bladder, it is then dispelled out of the body through a tube called the “u Continue reading >>

Why Does My Urine Smell Like Ammonia?

Why Does My Urine Smell Like Ammonia?

Urine can vary in color — and smell — based on the amount of waste products as well as fluids you take in over the course of the day. However, there are some out-of-the-ordinary smells that may indicate you need to seek medical treatment. One such example is a sweet smell to the urine, which can indicate excess glucose (blood sugar) in the urine. Another is the smell of ammonia, which has a strong, chemical-like smell. While urine that smells like ammonia isn’t always cause for concern, there are some instances where it can be. Waste products in urine often have an odor, but urine is usually diluted enough that the waste products don’t smell. However, if the urine becomes more concentrated — meaning there is a greater amount of waste products in relation to fluids — the urine is more likely to smell like ammonia. Urea is one of the waste products found in urine. It’s a byproduct of the breakdown of protein and can be broken down further to ammonia in certain situations. Therefore, many conditions that result in concentrated urine can cause urine that smells like ammonia. Conditions that can cause a person’s urine to smell like ammonia include: Bladder stones Stones in the bladder or kidneys can build up due to excess waste products in the bladder. Additional symptoms of bladder stones include: cloudy urine blood in the urine stomach pain dark urine Bladder stones themselves can be caused by a variety of conditions. Learn more about bladder stones. Dehydration Not having enough fluid circulating in the body means the kidneys are more likely to hold onto water, yet release waste products. As a result, the urine may be more concentrated and smell like ammonia. If your urine is darker in color and you’re passing only small amounts of urine, you may be dehy Continue reading >>

Sweet-smelling Urine: Causes, Symptoms, And When To See A Doctor

Sweet-smelling Urine: Causes, Symptoms, And When To See A Doctor

Urine may smell sweet if it contains extra glucose, which is a type of sugar. Diabetes is a common causes of this, but the smell of someone's urine can also change for other reasons. Urine can reveal a lot about someone's health. So while it might feel strange to discuss the odor of urine with a doctor, it is important that a person talks to a health provider if they notice a sudden change in the appearance or odor of their urine. In this article, we discuss the reasons for sweet- or fruity-smelling urine, symptoms, warning signs, and when to see a doctor. The look and odor of urine may be affected by a person's diet. Because urine helps the body get rid of waste, a person's diet and fluid intake can affect the way their urine looks and smells. If the odor of urine changes temporarily, this could be caused by something a person has eaten recently. For example, asparagus can give the urine an unusually strong odor. Some disorders, medications, and supplements may also affect the way urine smells. A person who notices a change in the smell of their urine should monitor their symptoms, and if they continue, should talk to a doctor. The most common reasons why urine may smell sweet include: Taking vitamin B6 supplements can change the smell of urine. A person with uncontrolled diabetes may have blood glucose levels that are dangerously high. The body tries to get rid of the extra glucose in the urine, and this can cause a sweet smell. People with sweet-smelling urine due to diabetes may notice other symptoms, including: This condition occurs when a person does not have enough insulin and usually, but not always, very high blood sugar levels. Insulin helps the body break down glucose to use for fuel. When the body cannot produce enough insulin to use glucose, it begins brea Continue reading >>

Common Causes Of Smelly Pee

Common Causes Of Smelly Pee

Smelly pee on its own isn't usually a cause for concern. There are often things you can do to help your pee return to normal. Pee is usually clear or pale yellow, with a mild smell. Common things that can make your pee smell stronger include: certain types of food and drink, like asparagus or coffee being dehydrated some medicines vitamin B6 supplements Things you can do yourself Try these things to help keep your pee clear and smelling mild. drink plenty of fluids, particularly water or squash – drink more in hot weather and when exercising eat garlic or asparagus – they contain strong-smelling chemicals that can pass into your pee See a GP if you have smelly pee and: you need to pee suddenly, or more often than usual you have pain or a burning sensation when peeing there's blood in your pee you have lower tummy pain you feel tired and unwell you're feeling confused or agitated These may be symptoms of a urinary tract infection (UTI). Less common causes of smelly pee Other symptoms you have might give you an idea of what's causing your pee to smell. But don't self-diagnose – always see a GP. Symptoms Possible cause Feeling very thirsty and tired, peeing more than usual, sweet-smelling pee type 2 diabetes Lower back pain, pain when peeing, blood in pee kidney stones Yellow skin and eyes (jaundice), tummy pain, nausea and vomiting liver failure Next review due: 16/10/2020 Call 111 If you can’t speak to your GP or don’t know what to do next. Continue reading >>

Urine Odor: Symptoms & Signs

Urine Odor: Symptoms & Signs

ANORO is only approved for use in COPD. ANORO is NOT approved for use in asthma. People with asthma who take long-acting beta2-adrenergic agonist (LABA) medicines, such as vilanterol (one of the medicines in ANORO), have an increased risk of death from asthma problems. It is not known if LABA medicines increase the risk of death in people with COPD. Call your healthcare provider if breathing problems worsen over time while using ANORO. Get emergency medical care if your breathing worsens quickly or if use of your rescue inhaler does not relieve your breathing problems. Do not use ANORO to treat sudden breathing problems. Always have a rescue inhaler with you to treat sudden symptoms. It is not known if ANORO is safe and effective in people with asthma. Do not use ANORO if you have a severe allergy to milk proteins or any of the ingredients in ANORO. Ask your healthcare provider if you are not sure. Do not use ANORO more often than prescribed. Do not take ANORO with other medicines that contain a LABA or an anticholinergic for any reason. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take and about all of your health conditions. ANORO can cause serious side effects, including: sudden breathing problems immediately after inhaling your medicine. If you experience this, stop using ANORO and call your healthcare provider right away. serious allergic reactions. Call your healthcare provider or get emergency medical care if you get any of the following symptoms: rash hives swelling of your face, mouth, and tongue breathing problems effects on heart increased blood pressure a fast or irregular heartbeat, awareness of heartbeat chest pain effects on nervous system new or worsened eye problems, including acute narrow-angle glaucoma that can cause permanent loss of vis Continue reading >>

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Urine Odor?

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Urine Odor?

Before digging into “How Diabetes Type 2 Affects Urine Odor?” we’d like to first cover normal urine odor. What’s considered normal urine odor? Your urine or pee is a way for your body to get rid of extra water. In addition, your body tries to flush out a lot of unnecessary materials through your urine. The urine contains a chemical called ammonia, which sometimes gives your urine a strong odor (smell). Urine is a way for the body to get rid of things that might be harmful to it or might be building up in excess within the body. Normally, your urine is yellowish in color and has no specific or somewhat strong odor. What happens to urine odor in diabetes? Something strange happens to the urine odor for type 2 diabetes. The urine starts smelling “sweet or fruity”. Why does the smell change? Your body needs sugar to accomplish all your daily activities. This sugar comes from the food you eat. To turn this sugar into energy, your body relies on a hormone called “insulin”. Think of insulin as a messenger that signals your cells to convert sugar into energy. But in diabetes type 2, your body stops responding to the insulin in your body. Your insulin is still there but it does not work the way it is supposed to. It’s the same as getting a key stuck in a door lock. The key is there but it’s not functioning the way it should. This is what happens in diabetes type 2 as well. As already mentioned, the main function of insulin is to decrease blood sugar levels by signaling body cells and turning them into energy. Once your bodies insulin fails to perform its function, your cells do not get the signal to turn blood sugar into energy and your blood levels of sugar start to rise. Once your blood sugar levels are high enough, your body cells start breaking sugar into Continue reading >>

See A Doctor If Your Pee Looks, Smells, Or Feels Like This

See A Doctor If Your Pee Looks, Smells, Or Feels Like This

When you hit the restroom, do you regularly turn around and give what’s in the bowl a quick once-over before flushing? If you answered no, well, it’s time to start. That’s because the color, odor, and consistency of your urine—not to mention the way it feels when it’s streaming out of you—can clue you in to what’s going on in your body. Here, seven warning signs to be on the lookout for every time you go: It Has a Sweet Scent No, this has nothing to do with your dessert habits. “Sweet-smelling urine is often an important clue in the diagnosis of diabetes,” says Holly Phillips, M.D., a women’s health specialist and medical contributor for CBS2 News in New York City. And for people who know they have diabetes, the sweet smell can indicate that their blood-sugar level is not as under control as it should be. You Notice Cloudiness Consider it a tip-off to the presence of bacteria that could indicate a urinary tract infection (UTI). “The cloudiness comes from the excretion of bacteria and leukocytes, which are cells that fight infection,” says Phillips. Even if you otherwise feel fine and have no UTI symptoms, pay attention to this; it could be the only sign that an infection has taken hold. RELATED: Everything You Never Wanted to Know About Public Toilets There's a Pink or Reddish Color Though red-purple hued veggies like beets and blackberries might be the culprit, the color can also indicate the presence of blood in your pee—not a good sign. That’s a symptom of a UTI, kidney stones, or in rare cases even bladder or kidney cancer, says Phillips. It Smells Foul Urine isn’t supposed to smell like roses, but if the stench is pretty foul (think: rotten fruit or the bottom of a pond), it’s your bladder’s alarming way of telling you there’s an Continue reading >>

What Does Glucose In The Urine Smell Like

What Does Glucose In The Urine Smell Like

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community What does glucose in the urine smell like I often have yeasty smelling urine - is this a glucose smell? I've read several different answers on Google - some say it's a sign of diabetes and some say a yeast infection. To me smells like a bowl of Sugar puffs with milk Ummmmmmmm :!: Good old days Sugar puffs with milk :? I would forget about the smell - taste works much better! Smelly urine can also be caused by a bacterial infection, not uncommon in diabetics. Ask the doc for a simple test (strip dipped in). Look for cloudy urine (can be many things, but sugary urine is some times cloudy). Have you tested your blood sugar levels ? For sugar to appear in the urine your blood sugar levels will have to have been over 10-12 mmol/L . From a midwifery perspective, I've always found it to smell sweet rather than foul. I can usually pick up on gestational diabetes before even testing the urine. Ancient Greeks noticed that ants were attracted to urine from people with diabetes. As it's warm and dry now, you could try pouring a bit of urine near a ant trail and seeing if they deviate from their route. To me smells like a bowl of Sugar puffs with milk Ummmmmmmm :!: Good old days Sugar puffs with milk :? Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family. Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android Continue reading >>

Type 2 - I Think My Body/sweat Smells Of Urine | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - I Think My Body/sweat Smells Of Urine | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 I think my body/sweat smells of urine Over the last week I have notice a urine like smell on my body (even after my daily shower). I do have 'ops' moments and wear pads which I change through out the day so thought they might be the smell source. But I don't think it is that. I also still have hot flushes a couple of times a day and hot weather doesn't help. I think I have a general body odour now. On separate occasions different friends have commented. Saying oh it smells like a cat has pissed in here and there is a real fish smell. These were not directed at me but I fear when I see them again they will see that is me smelling. Does anyone know if this is a Diabetes symptom or what I might do to stop this? Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member It may be ketones. See I had a similar problem years ago..went to East Timor for 4 weeks as part of a uni program for social justice but the diet was rice rice and more rice. My skin took on a perculiar odor which inretrospect may have been ketones. I'm type 2 diabetic, didn't take a glucometer and obviously didn't think it through re diet as I was not on meds at that time. Hope things improve of you. If I get ketosis or ketones you get that sorted of small sent or a sent of berries but it is only for a few days when you go to hospital and get meds sent through you which is normally insulin and antibiotics and glucose via a drip and if you don't get it sorted out you can do a lot of damage to your body and organs as it happened to me a couple of months ago and I was really ill with it and I could have died with it if I hadn't seen a doctor in the hospital and I was back to normal within Continue reading >>

Urine Smell Warning: The Scent Of Your Wee Could Be A Sign Of This Deadly Condition

Urine Smell Warning: The Scent Of Your Wee Could Be A Sign Of This Deadly Condition

Smelling your wee might not be themost pleasant of activities, but it could give you a clue as to how health you are. In a healthy person urine should not really have a smell, according to the NHS. It may have a stronger scent first thing in the morning when it is more concentrated, or if someone is dehydrated. Otherwise it should generally not be too noticeable. The NHS suggest drinking more fluids to improve the smell. Consuming asparagus, beer, garlic and coffee may give your urine a stronger smell. But only two-fifths of adults can smell the effect of asparagus due to genetics. However, these are the other reasons your urine may smell - and, in some cases, a strong scent could indicate a serious condition. Food According to the NHS, consuming asparagus, beer, garlic and coffee may give your urine a stronger smell. However, being able to smell the effect of asparagus in urine is actually down to genes - only two-fifths of adults can detect it, according to a 2016 study. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. Diabetes Abnormally sweet-smelling urine may be a sign you are not managing your diabetes properly. Other signs of uncontrolled diabetes include increased thirst, unexplained weight loss and high blood glucose readings. Uncontrolled diabetes can raise risk of heart disease and stroke. Urinary stones This condition can cause an ammonia-like smell. Depending on where the stone is located it may also be called a kidney stone or bladder stone. Symptoms may also include severe pain, nausea and vomiting. Medicines Medications and vitamin and mineral supplements can make the scent of urine more apparent. However, the NHS warn that you should never stop taking prescribed medication for this reason, unless advised by a Continue reading >>

What Is Your Urine Trying To Tell You?

What Is Your Urine Trying To Tell You?

I realize that it may seem strange to be reading a posting about urine. However, last week I wrote about urinary tract infections (which we know are common both in women and in people who have diabetes), so I think this week’s topic is relevant. Also, the color, smell, and consistency of your urine can give you and your doctor helpful information about what might be going on in your body. Historically, looking at urine has been a way for doctors to gauge a person’s health, especially before other types of testing were available. If you’ve had diabetes for a long time or know someone who has, you’ll know that urine testing was a way to figure out how well controlled (or uncontrolled) a persons’ diabetes was — this was done in the days before blood glucose meters were available. Now, of course, we have more sophisticated tools to convey glucose information. But urine still has its place. What is urine? Urine is a waste product that contains breakdown products from food, drinks, medicines, cosmetics, environmental contaminants, and by-products from metabolism and bacteria. Amazingly, urine contains more than 3,000 compounds — much more than what’s found in other body fluids, like saliva or cerebrospinal fluid. The kidneys do a remarkable job of filtering and concentrating to help get these compounds out of the body (you can understand why keeping your kidneys healthy is so important). So, what is your urine telling you? If your urine is… Bright yellow. This may look alarming, especially when your urine seems to be glowing in the dark. But don’t worry — the bright yellow color is likely due to vitamins, specifically, B vitamins and beta carotene. Green or blue. Green or blue urine seems like something straight out of a science fiction movie, but the co Continue reading >>

More in diabetes