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What Does A Primary Care Physician Do For Diabetes

10 Medical Professionals Who Can Help You Manage Type 2 Diabetes | Everyday Health

10 Medical Professionals Who Can Help You Manage Type 2 Diabetes | Everyday Health

You have figured out by now that taking control of your diabetes means managing the level of glucose in your blood. Making that happen involves creating a diet, exercise, medication, and glucose-monitoring plan and enlisting the help and support of a battery of professionals to show you how to get on track and help you stay there. Heres a list of the healthcare providers you will need to have on your team as you take up the challenge of type 2 diabetes. Your primary-care physician or a certified diabetes educator (CDE) can help you make sure that all these professionals are coordinating your care effectively. Each member of your team will be counting on you to be open and honest about how you feel and how successfully you are following your diet, exercise, and medication routines. Primary-care physician: Your family doctor will monitor your general health and help coordinate your care as you take responsibility for your type 2 diabetes. Endocrinologist: This doctor treats diabetes and other diseases of the endocrine glands, which produce the hormones that control physical functions and which the insulin-producing pancreas is part of. This specialist can help you learn to monitor your blood-glucose levels and can prescribe and monitor medications to control them. Nutritionist or registered dietitian: These experts in nutrition will help you understand the relationship between food and diabetes and help you create an eating plan that works for you and your particular lifestyle while taking into account how physically active you are. Pharmacist: This professional can help you understand your medications and how they work and will make sure that you are not taking other medications that can interfere with your diabetes treatment. Certified diabetes educator (CDE): This cer Continue reading >>

Endocrinologist Or Primary Care? You May Need To Shop Around For The Right Doctor

Endocrinologist Or Primary Care? You May Need To Shop Around For The Right Doctor

Your primary care doctor may or may not be the right person to treat diabetes.(HEALTH/SEAN LOCKE/ISTOCKPHOTO)Like many aspects of type 2 diabetes, it may take some trial and error before you find the right doctor. Primary care doctors, such as family physicians and internists, treat most people with type 2 diabetes. But even if you like your primary care doctor, he or she may not be the right person to manage type 2 diabetes. You might be happier with someone else, or with an endocrinologist, a specialist in hormone-related diseases such as diabetes. In general, family physicians are trained in all areas of medicine and treat adults and children. Internists specialize in internal medicine and only treat adults. Internists may or may not have in-depth training in diabetes (they can choose to do one to three additional years of training in one of 13 sub-specialties, such as endocrinology or cardiology). EndocrinologistIt was harder to find one than I thought Watch videoMore about finding the right doctor Your primary care doctor may be a great fitor not Anil Verma, a 38-year-old Seattle-area resident, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2005. He had been seeing one doctor in a large practice, but wasn't that happy with his care. Verma asked four nurses in the practice who they would recommend, and they all suggested the same doctor, who was in the same practice as his current one. So he switched. "With diabetes, if you don't have a good doctor, it just becomes a pain. This guy's not a specialist in diabeteshe's a primary care guy, but he seems to have a lot of experience with diabetic folks and really keeps up-to-date. And he works well with me," Verma says. The software developer likes to keep detailed logs of his blood sugar readings, and the doctor spends plenty of t Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your health care team helps you manage your diabetes and maintain your good health. According to the American Diabetes Association, your diabetes care team should include: You: You are the most important member of your diabetes care team! Only you know how you feel. Your diabetes care team will depend on you to talk to them honestly and supply information about your body. Monitoring your blood sugar tells your doctors whether your current treatment is controlling your diabetes well. By checking your blood sugar levels, you can also prevent or reduce the episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) you have. Primary doctor: Your primary care doctor is who you see for general checkups and when you get sick. This person is usually an internist or family medicine doctor who has experience treating people with diabetes, too. Because your primary care doctor is your main source of care, he or she will most likely head up your diabetes care team. Endocrinologist: An endocrinologist is a doctor who has special training and experience in treating people with diabetes. You should see yours regularly. Dietitian: A registered dietitian (RD) is trained in the field of nutrition. Food is a key part of your diabetes treatment, so yours will help you figure out your food needs based on your weight, lifestyle, medication, and other health goals (like lowering blood fat levels or blood pressure). Nurse educator: A diabetes educator or diabetes nurse practitioner is a registered nurse (RN) with special training and background in caring for and teaching people with diabetes. Nurse educators often help you with the day-to-day aspects of living with diabetes. Eye doctor: Either an ophthalmologist (a doctor who can treat eye problems both medically and surgically) or an optometrist (someone who Continue reading >>

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

Many people who have diabetes also have an experienced primary care (or family practice) doctor or nurse practitioner who can help them manage their diabetes. For example, people with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes may never need to see a specialist because they can easily manage it with their primary care doctor’s help. Other people, however, might choose to see a specialist. Here are 10 reasons why you might want to see an endocrinologist or diabetes care team: 1) Your doctor recommends you have an evaluation with a specialist. After you have been diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may recommend you see a specialist to confirm the diagnosis and make sure you know your options for managing the disease. 2) Your primary care physician has not treated many diabetes patients. If your doctor has not treated many patients with diabetes or you are unsure about their treatment, you can choose to see a specialist. 3) You are having problems communicating with your doctor. If you feel your doctor is not listening to you or understanding your symptoms, you could see a specialist who will focus primarily on your diabetes. 4) You cannot find the right educational material to help you. Treatment for diabetes starts with learning to manage your diabetes. If you can’t find the right information to help you manage your diabetes, you might want to see a diabetes care team to receive diabetes education. 5) You are having complications or difficulty managing your diabetes. You should definitely see a specialist if you have developed complications. Diabetes typically causes problems with the eyes, kidney, and nerves. In addition, it can cause deformity and open sores on the feet. Diabetes complications only get worse with time, and can cause you to miss out on quality of life. In addi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Specialist - Austin, Tx & Cedar Park, Tx: Austin Primary Care Physicians: Internist

Diabetes Specialist - Austin, Tx & Cedar Park, Tx: Austin Primary Care Physicians: Internist

Internists & Podiatrists located in Austin, TX & Cedar Park, TX The 29 million Americans diagnosed with diabetes know its more than a medical condition; its a disease that can wreak havoc on their lives and bodies if left unmanaged. Sadly, an estimated 8 million Americans with diabetes are undiagnosed today. Establishing a relationship with the expert physicians at Austin Primary Care Physicians can ensure patients in Austin, Texas, are diagnosed and treated early and effectively. Diabetes is an endocrine disorder in which the body doesn't make enough (or any) insulin to break down sugars in the blood or in which the body becomes less reactive to sugar levels in the blood. What are the signs and symptoms of diabetes? Not all patients notice signs and symptoms before being diagnosed with diabetes but those who do, report the following symptoms (which generally apply for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes): What are the complications associated with diabetes? Proper management of diabetes is critical in decreasing risk of complications. Long-term complications include heart disease, nerve damage, foot/toe amputations, blindness, hearing impairment, kidney damage, and Alzheimers disease. In very severe cases, diabetics can develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a life-threatening emergency related to high blood sugar. DKA requires emergency intervention. Successful diabetes treatment always requires physician involvement. The treatment of diabetes is dependent on a comprehensive diabetes treatment plan, which includes close monitoring of blood sugar levels, medications (especially insulin), diet, exercise, and periodic evaluation from a team of specialists. The diabetics care team might include their primary care practitioner, a podiatrist (foot doctor), nutritionist, endocrin Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Treatment Strategies For Primary Care To Boost Patient Adherence

New Diabetes Treatment Strategies For Primary Care To Boost Patient Adherence

About 25.8 million U.S. children and adults have diabetes. In 2013, diabetes accounted for $176 billion in direct medical costs. Part of the aim of the Affordable Care Act is to reduce these costs while improving the management of chronic conditions. Achieving these goals, however, requires primary care practices to update their strategies for keeping patients with diabetes healthy. Perhaps the greatest challenge for primary care physicians (PCPs) practicing in the era of accountable care is meeting quality and outcomes targets that are dependent on patient behavior. Of particular concern to many PCPs are the health issues faced by obese patients with diabetes, says Molly Cooke, MD, immediate past president of the American College of Physicians and a practicing internist. That’s because helping these patients—and meeting quality goals—usually requires the patient to make difficult behavioral changes such as losing weight and exercising more. Like most PCPs, Cooke is always looking for creative ways to engage patients with diabetes. But patients’ feelings of frustration and denial about having a chronic condition often get in the way. “I wish we understood better how to get people fired up about their chronic illness,” she says. “The contrast for me comes from my early experience taking care of people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). They were [angry] that they had HIV and many of them fairly skeptical about their physicians. … I usually found that I could take that energy and really focus it on what the patient needed to do well. “I began wondering why patients with diabetes often have an almost fatalistic attitude about their diabetes, and wishing I could transplant some of my HIV patients’ energy into my diabetic patients,” she adds. “I Continue reading >>

Primary Care Physician Perspectives On Basal Insulin Initiation And Maintenance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus - Sciencedirect

Primary Care Physician Perspectives On Basal Insulin Initiation And Maintenance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus - Sciencedirect

Volume 12, Issue 2 , April 2018, Pages 155-162 Primary care physician perspectives on basal insulin initiation and maintenance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus Author links open overlay panel SamanehKaliraia 85% of 100 surveyed US-based PCPs made the decision to start patients on insulin. Challenges reflect patients lack of confidence and perception of personal failure. Opportunities include more frequent contact and referrals to patient support groups. To describe primary care physicians (PCPs) perceptions of patient reactions and concerns about insulin initiation and identify opportunities for increased support. Cross-sectional, online survey of PCPs prescribing basal insulin to adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). PCPs were identified from administrative claims of a large commercial health plan and descriptive results of PCP responses were reported. PCPs (N=100) treated an average of 17 patients receiving insulin during a typical week. More than 85% of insulin initiation recommendations originated with PCPs. Most offered glucose monitoring instructions (96%) and advice on diet, exercise, and diabetes management (96%); 35% provided insulin titration algorithms; 93% reported that patients often or always took their insulin daily within 3 months of initiation; 31% of PCPs reported monthly office contacts with patients for the first 3 months; 16% reported no outreach efforts; fewer than 20% connected patients with support groups. When starting basal insulin, PCPs reported patients feeling personal failure regarding their diabetes treatment (33% often/always) and lacking confidence in their ability to manage insulin therapy (38% often/always). Study results identify additional opportunities for assisting patients in making the transition to insulin, incl Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Practical Approaches For Primary Care Physicians | The Journal Of The American Osteopathic Association

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Practical Approaches For Primary Care Physicians | The Journal Of The American Osteopathic Association

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Practical Approaches for Primary Care Physicians James R. Gavin, III, MD, PhD ; Jeffrey S. Freeman, DO ; Jay H. Shubrook, Jr, DO ; Frank Lavernia, MD From Healing Our Village, Inc, in Lanham, Maryland, and Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Gavin); from Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, in Pennsylvania (Dr Freeman); from Cornwell Center for Diabetes and Cardiovascular Care, in Athens, Georgia (Dr Shubrook); and from private practice in Coconut Creek, Florida (Dr Lavernia). Address correspondence to James R. Gavin III, MD, PhD, Healing Our Village, Inc, 10104 Senate Dr, Suite 210, Lanham, MD 20706-4393.E-mail: [email protected] Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Practical Approaches for Primary Care Physicians The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 2011, Vol. 111, S3-S12. doi: The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 2011, Vol. 111, S3-S12. doi: Gavin JR, Freeman JS, Shubrook JH, Lavernia F. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Practical Approaches for Primary Care Physicians. J Am Osteopath Assoc 2011;111(5_suppl_4):S3S12. doi: . Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Practical Approaches for Primary Care Physicians You will receive an email whenever this article is corrected, updated, or cited in the literature. You can manage this and all other alerts in My Account The incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have reached epidemic proportions in the United States. In addition to growing numbers of individuals in whom T2DM has been diagnosed, in numerous others T2DM or prediabetes remains undiagnosed or is likely to develop in the near future. Identification of individuals at risk for T2DM, as well as those who may already have the disease but in whom it has not yet been dia Continue reading >>

Primary Care Physicians: Your Partners In Diabetes Care

Primary Care Physicians: Your Partners In Diabetes Care

By Carolyn Sayre for Summit Medical Group If you have diabetes you may be wondering if you should see a specialist in the field, called an endocrinologist. But the majority of patients with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes are actually treated by their primary care physician (PCP) – which may be an internist or family physician. PCPs at Summit Medical Group are trained to help manage our more than 10,000 patients with diabetes. As the quarterbacks of patient care, establishing a close relationship with a PCP is one of the best ways you can help keep your disease in check. “PCPs are the bedrock of patient care. We walk this journey with them the entire way,” says Jill Gora, MD, family physician at Summit Medical Group. “Diabetes is an extremely common diagnosis in our world. The vast majority of patients with diabetes can be effectively treated by a skilled PCP.” PCPs are usually the first doctors to diagnose diabetes. This often happens during a routine physical exam. Since PCPs have a unique window into the patient’s medical history and family life, they are in the best position to notice any changes in their physical or emotional health. “Ever year, we hear about the patient’s entire health story. We learn about their joys and stresses and get a sense of their overall environment at home and in the workplace. This gives us an opportunity to really understand our patients both physically and emotionally,” says Dr. Gora. Furthermore, PCPs follow the health of the entire family. This is particularly important in type 2 diabetes, because it is highly genetic. “If I hear that a mother, father, brother, or sister has type 2 diabetes, I watch that patient’s blood sugar like a hawk,” she says. Dr. Gora advises patients to find a PCP they feel comfortable Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition that affects a person's blood sugar levels and can require various treatments. Understanding which doctors help treat diabetes can simplify the process, making it less stressful. This article helps people with diabetes to understand the key differences between the various diabetes specialists. It also covers some common guidelines to follow for visiting each of these experts, to ensure you get the most out of your treatment. Which doctors help with treating diabetes? There are a number of diabetes specialists who may be involved in treating someone with this common condition. As each of these specialists has a slightly different role, there are some key things to be aware of before seeing each one. General care physicians A general care physician will often help in the treatment of people with diabetes. Regular check-ups will usually be carried out once every 3 to 4 months. If there is anything outside their area of expertise, a general care physician will frequently send an individual to an endocrinologist first of all. Endocrinologists The most common specialists in the field of diabetes are endocrinologists. Endocrinologists specialize in the glands of the body, and the hormones that are produced from those glands. The pancreas is a gland that comes under the spotlight when managing diabetes. It produces insulin that helps regulate blood sugar. In the case of people with diabetes, insulin is either not produced or does not work properly. People with type 1 diabetes are put under the care of an endocrinologist most of the time. People with type 2 diabetes, who have fluctuating blood sugar levels, will also need to see an endocrinologist. Visiting a doctor for diabetes When visiting a doctor about diabetes for the first time, it is important tha Continue reading >>

Primary Care Physicians Practice Regarding Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosis, Evaluation And Management In The West Region Of Cameroon

Primary Care Physicians Practice Regarding Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosis, Evaluation And Management In The West Region Of Cameroon

Primary care physicians practice regarding diabetes mellitus diagnosis, evaluation and management in the West region of Cameroon Ahmadou M Jingi , Jobert Richie N Nansseu , and Jean Jacques N Noubiap Department of Internal Medicine and Specialties, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaound I, Yaound, Cameroon Internal Medicine Unit, Eda Regional Hospital, Eda, Cameroon Medical Diagnostic Center, Yaound, Cameroon Department of Internal Medicine and Specialties, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaound I, Yaound, Cameroon Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Yaound, Cameroon Internal Medicine Unit, Eda Regional Hospital, Eda, Cameroon Medical Diagnostic Center, Yaound, Cameroon Ahmadou M Jingi, Email: [email protected] . Received 2014 Dec 3; Accepted 2015 Mar 30. Copyright Jingi et al.; licensee BioMed Central. 2015 This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( ) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are the main providers of diabetes care especially in resource-limited countries which experience extreme shortage of specialists. The present study aimed to evaluate PCPs approach towards diabetes mellitus (DM) diagnosis, evaluation and management in Cameroon. We carried-out a cross-sectional survey in February 2012 in the West Region of Cameroon. Using a structured pretested questionnaire, we interviewed all PCPs wor Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Primary Care Physician

Diabetes And The Primary Care Physician

The number of patients identified with diabetes is growing every year. For every patient diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, there are numerous people with type 1 diabetes and pre-diabetes who go undiagnosed. Early detection of the disease and initiation of treatment can make a huge difference the outcome for the patient. The primary care physician plays a key role in this step. The Primary Care Physician Detecting the signs of pre-diabetes or diabetes early can enable your primary care physician to work with you in slowing the progression of the disease. This can vastly lower your risk for diabetes related health complications. Primary care physicians identify patients at risk for diabetes based on family history and other factors. Member of certain racial ethnicities are more likely to present with the disease. Patients, who have a history of cardiovascular disease, are obese or overweight, and even those with a sedentary lifestyle are at a high risk for diabetes.[1] Pregnant women are screened for gestational diabetes. In addition, patients with certain symptoms will be screened for diabetes. Diagnosis by the Primary Care Physician The first step in treating a patient suspected of having diabetes is proper diagnosis. If your primary care physician suspects you have diabetes he or she will recommend a plasma glucose test. The most common tests are the two hour postprandial glucose test and the fasting plasma glucose test.[2] Once your doctor has the test results, the physician will meet with you. If the results are positive for diabetes, you will begin the journey of learning about the disease, how to manage the disease, and what lifestyle changes you will be making. Your primary care physician will guide you through this journey. During your initial ‘diagnosis meeting Continue reading >>

Relationship Between Primary Care Physicians Adherence To Guidelines For The Treatment Of Diabetes And Patient Satisfaction: Findings From A Pilot Study | Family Practice | Oxford Academic

Relationship Between Primary Care Physicians Adherence To Guidelines For The Treatment Of Diabetes And Patient Satisfaction: Findings From A Pilot Study | Family Practice | Oxford Academic

Background. Adherence to clinical guidelines improves health care outcomes, reduces expenditure and prevents the complication of unnecessary interventions. It is uncertain what effect the adherence to guidelines for treating diabetes has on patient satisfaction. Some authors have reported that the use of guidelines does not affect patient satisfaction with care, and have concluded that satisfaction is related to a physicians interpersonal skills, rather than to the quality of care. Others have reported that structured intervention programmes improve patient satisfaction with care. Objective. The purpose of our study was to explore the association between adherence to clinical guidelines and satisfaction with care among diabetics. Methods. The study population included 135 randomly sampled diabetes patients listed with 12 primary care physicians at two health plans in Israel, which together insure >80% of the population. Telephone interviews were conducted with the patients between August and November 2000, using structured questionnaires. Patients were asked to report on the extent to which their primary care physician treated them as indicated by the clinical guidelines of these health plans. They were also asked to rate their satisfaction with their primary care physician and the treatment of their disease. Bi-variate analysis was conducted using the chi-square statistical significance test. Multivariate analysis was conducted using logistic regression models. Results. Adherence to guidelines for diabetes was associated with patient satisfaction with care, independently of the patients ethnicity (first language), age, gender, education, medication (insulin versus other) and health plan affiliation. Conclusion. Patients who report being treated as recommended in pract Continue reading >>

Finding The Right Doctor

Finding The Right Doctor

How to pick a great physicianand get the most out of your visit No one goes to the doctor for fun. There's always a wait. The examination rooms are cold and bare. The flimsy paper gowns are mortifying. When you add wrestling with insurance to the mix, a simple office visit can seem like an ordeal. All that, and the typical appointment lasts only 10 minutes, which can feel like hardly enough time to even begin to discuss your health. Fed up yet? Well, the doctors are, too: Cramming dozens of appointments into a single day is frustrating enough, but when your doc isn't rushing between exam rooms, he or she is on the phone with insurance companies to make sure patients get the tests and medications they need. While some of the things that make doctors' visits frantic are out of your hands, others are up to you. We've tapped experts from across the country to help you choose a doctor, plan for a visit, and make sure all of your health questions get answered. Picking a doctor isn't as easy, of course, as opening the phone book and calling the first office you see. "This is a person you have to get along with," says Ruthann Russo, PhD, JD, MPH, RHIT, author of 7 Steps to Your Best Possible Healthcare: The Essential Guide for Crafting Your Personal Healthcare Plan. "The relationship between you and the physician, whether you think you can trust them, is really important." By doing some research before booking an appointment, you can increase your chances of finding The One. For starters, all doctors should be board certified. You can find one who has received certification by visiting the American Board of Medical Specialties' website, www.abms.org. Next, make sure your primary care physician has special training in diabetes. "Be sure that the physician [you're] going to see Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doctors

Diabetes Doctors

A number of different healthcare professionals treat diabetes. A good first step is to talk to your primary care doctor about testing if you’re at risk for diabetes or if you begin experiencing symptoms associated with the disease. While you may work with your primary care doctor to manage your diabetes, it’s also possible to rely on another doctor or specialist to monitor your condition. Read on to learn about the different doctors and specialists who can assist in various aspects of diabetes diagnosis and care. Primary care physician Your primary care doctor can monitor you for diabetes at your regular checkups. Your doctor may perform blood tests to check for the disease, depending on your symptoms or risk factors. If you do have diabetes, your doctor may prescribe medication and manage your condition. They may also refer you to a specialist to help monitor your treatment. It’s likely that your primary care doctor will be part of a team of healthcare professionals who will work with you. Endocrinologist Diabetes is a disease of the pancreas gland, which is part of the endocrine system. An endocrinologist is a specialist who diagnoses, treats, and manages pancreatic diseases. People with type 1 diabetes are often under the care of an endocrinologist to help them manage their treatment plan. Sometimes, people with type 2 diabetes may also need an endocrinologist if they have trouble getting their blood glucose levels under control. Eye doctor Many people with diabetes experience complications with their eyes over time. These might include: You must regularly visit an eye doctor, such an optometrist or ophthalmologist, to check for these potentially serious conditions. According to guidelines from the American Diabetes Association, people with type 1 diabetes shou Continue reading >>

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