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What Does A Diabetes Educator Do?

Diabetes Educators Needed To Respond To Growing Epidemic

Diabetes Educators Needed To Respond To Growing Epidemic

With an estimated 23.6 million Americans with diabetes, the demand for treatments and informed healthcare professionals is climbing. Diabetes patients and the professionals who treat them must stay abreast of a rapidly changing field. Enter the diabetes educator. Of the more than 12,000 professionals who belong to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), more than half are nurses. Nurses with a knack for education and an interest in the ever-evolving field of diabetes are ideal candidates for this specialty. “Next to my family, diabetes education has been the most satisfying, fascinating thing I’ve ever done,” says Ginger Kanzer-Lewis, RN, BC, EdM, CDE, an independent diabetes consultant in New York and Florida. “It allows you to make an impact on other people’s lives. There is no other disease in which patients decide if they will do well. It is phenomenal to watch patients realize that they are in control of their own destiny.” Teaching Diabetes Patients, Educators Alike Although Kanzer-Lewis is now an independent consultant, she started her diabetes education career while working at Catholic Medical Center in New Hampshire. Early in her career, when she was the hospital’s director of education, nurses who had patients diagnosed with diabetes would repeatedly approach her. “They didn’t know what to teach them,” she says. “I did some research and found there was nothing out there for diabetes patient education, so I designed a program for these patients.” Today’s diabetes education programs typically include teaching self-care behaviors, such as healthy eating, being active, monitoring, taking medication, solving problems, healthy coping and reducing risks. Diabetes educators may teach all-day group courses, two half-day courses Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educators (cdes): What You Should Know

Certified Diabetes Educators (cdes): What You Should Know

We get a lot of questions about Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) – what they can offer patients, how to find one, and even how to become a diabetes educator yourself if interested. We’ve queried some top diabetes education experts in the country to compile this at-a-glance guide. Read on for practical information about the world of CDEs, along with lists of the Top Tips for Patients to Make the Most of Their CDE Appointments, and Top Things You Should Know About Becoming a CDE. A huge thank you to the following expert contributors: Deborah Greenwood, Diabetes Clinical Specialist and 2015 president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Jane K. Dickinson, RN, PhD, CDE, Coordinator of the Columbia University Master’s in Diabetes Education and Management program, and person with type 1 diabetes herself Jennifer Smith, CDE, Registered Dietitian & Director of Lifestyle and Nutrition at Integrated Diabetes Services, also living with type 1 diabetes herself Marissa Town, RN, CDE and a type 1 diabetes patient too, who was the inspiration for the Children With Diabetes (CWD) community Diabetes Educator Basics What is a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE)? CDEs are healthcare professionals trained specifically to coach patients with diabetes through their own self-care. This means coaching on glucose testing, medication dosing, insulin delivery, results logging and more. Some CDEs even have specialized training as insulin pump educators, focusing on helping patients get set up on those advanced devices. What Does a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) Do? CDEs work with patients and their families to teach diabetes self-management skills, and help with everyday challenges that doctors often don’t have time to address. They work in hospitals, clinics and sm Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Educator In Your Pocket

A Diabetes Educator In Your Pocket

One Drop CDE Rachel Head discusses the benefits to having real-time access to a diabetes educator, and how One Drop provides this essential diabetes support through the Experts Program. Why the need for a diabetes educator? On December 6th, I had a warm, fuzzy moment. That was the day that Diana*, the very first person to sign up for the One Drop Experts program, and I connected. Diana lives a thousand miles away. She’s trying to lower her A1C so she can have another child. Admittedly, she is hesitant when it comes to asking for help with her diabetes. She is a busy working mom who is also in school pursuing her degree. And, Diana feels her healthcare team has “all but given up” on her. As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have seen countless people benefit from clinic-based diabetes education over the years. But, how effective is the model of traditional diabetes education for someone like Diana? What does traditional diabetes education look like? First, Diana would have to be one of the 6.8% of patients who receive a doctor’s referral for diabetes self-management education (DSME). Hopefully, she would have some insurance benefits that help cover this A1C lowering treatment. Once she successfully schedules the appointment, Diana will have to check with her employer about leaving work early. She may also need to arrange childcare for her three-year-old. On the day of her appointment, Diana will need to pack up her diabetes gear and other belongings, and make the trip into the office by bus or by car. Her session might be short. It might be shared. Worst-case scenario, it might be irrelevant at that particular moment in time. She may not get another educational opportunity for a while. Regardless, Diana does what anyone with a chronic disease must do – she Continue reading >>

How To Become A Diabetes Educator

How To Become A Diabetes Educator

Expert Reviewed A diabetes educator specializes in treating and educating diabetic patients at clinics or hospitals. You can become a diabetes educator by getting hands-on experience as a doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other medical professional. Formalize your ability to provide diabetes patients with counseling and lifestyle management advice by obtaining official certification through the American Association of Diabetes Educators or the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators. Continue reading >>

You And Your Diabetes Educator

You And Your Diabetes Educator

You don’t have to manage diabetes alone. Get the facts about diabetes educators, key members of your care team. Let’s face it: Counting carbs, staying active, testing blood sugar and tweaking your meds can feel like a full-time job. So why not get a little help? Whether you have been diagnosed recently or have been living with diabetes for years, adding a diabetes educator to your care team is a smart step toward a healthier you. What’s a diabetes educator? Diabetes educators are qualified health professionals, including registered nurses, registered dietitians, and pharmacists, who work in hospitals, clinics, doctors’ offices or on their own to provide diabetes self-management education (DSME) or diabetes self-management training (DSMT). The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) defines DSME/DSMT as “a collaborative process through which people with or at risk for diabetes gain the knowledge and skills needed to modify behavior and successfully self-manage the disease and its related conditions.” Diabetes educators can earn two different types of credentials, CDE (certified diabetes educator) or BC-ADM (board certified–advanced diabetes management), and must go through a re-credentialing process every five years to stay up to date on advances in diabetes care. What does a diabetes educator do? A diabetes educator helps you set achievable behavioral goals and provides support by encouraging you to talk about your concerns and challenges. “One of my favorite questions to ask is, ‘What is standing in the way of your taking care of diabetes?’” explains Kim DeCoste, RN, MSN, CDE, manager of the Diabetes Center of Excellence of the Madison County Health Department in Kentucky. Some people have trouble following their doctors’ recommendatio Continue reading >>

What Does A Diabetes Educator Do?

What Does A Diabetes Educator Do?

By Patty Cebulko, manager of The Health Plan’s Disease Management department. Patty is a Registered Nurse and Certified Diabetes Educator, and works to educate and support people to understand and live well with diabetes. November is Diabetes Awareness Month, and November 6 through 12 is National Diabetes Educators Week. This week is set aside to give special recognition to the nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and other licensed health care professionals who specialize in educating people with diabetes about their condition. The training, counseling, and support that diabetes educators provide to patients is known as diabetes education or diabetes self-management training (DSMT). What does a diabetes educator do? Empowers and assists patients to modify lifestyle and adopt healthy self-care behaviors Trains patients and caregivers to use diabetes devices, such as blood glucose meters, insulin pens and pumps, and continuous glucose monitors Teaches problem-solving strategies and skills to help people with diabetes live healthy, active lifestyles Provides nutrition education that is individualized for each person and allows people with diabetes to eat “regular” foods Works with physicians and other members of your health care team to help manage medication regimens based on physician-directed protocols Helps you develop emotional coping skills Some diabetes educators carry the title of Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE). A CDE is a health professional who possesses comprehensive knowledge of and experience in prediabetes, diabetes prevention, and diabetes management. To become certified requires years of practice-based experience in diabetes education, along with specific knowledge and education requirements, along with a written examination with minimum passing requi Continue reading >>

What Does A Diabetes Educator Do?

What Does A Diabetes Educator Do?

ANSWER Diabetes educators will help you learn to take in stride all the things in your day-to-day life that can help control the disease -- like exercise, nutrition, medications, and checking your blood sugar. They may also work with your family so they understand your needs better and can be there to support you. Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Educator For Type 2 Diabetes

A Diabetes Educator For Type 2 Diabetes

Learning to live with type 2 diabetes can take some time and adjustments. Although they may not know it, people with diabetes usually have a great resource who can be a lifeline: the diabetes educator. Type 2 Diabetes: What Is a Diabetes Educator? Kathy Honick, RN, CDE, a diabetes educator at Barnes Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, explains that a certified diabetes educator can be a registered nurse, registered dietitian, pharmacist, registered nurse-practitioner, or physician's assistant. She says her goal is to help people with diabetes — and also those who are at risk of developing diabetes — learn about the disease and how to live with it successfully. Health professionals, like nurses, who want to become a certified diabetes educator must log many hours of direct interaction with diabetes patients over a period of two years, and then pass a test administered by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators. They then must be recertified every five years, proving that they’ve been keeping up-to-date on diabetes education and changes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), there are about 15,000 certified diabetes educators, like Honick, in the United States. Type 2 Diabetes: Why See a Diabetes Educator? Doctors and nurses can give you basic information about diabetes, but it’s a chronic and complicated disease that needs a more long-term support system. Honick notes that people who participate in a diabetes education program have much better chances of lowering their overall blood sugar than those who don't, according to the ADA. Karen, 54, a mammogram technician in North Carolina, found that until she saw a diabetes educator, “after several years of gradually increasing doses, I felt like I was rattling with all the pills inside me. Continue reading >>

5 Reasons I Love My Cde (certified Diabetes Educator)!

5 Reasons I Love My Cde (certified Diabetes Educator)!

Don’t have a CDE you really “click” with? That’s a shame…because not only does it not have to be that way, it’s also really important that we have CDEs we truly feel we can turn to for help when we’re facing the endless list of blood sugar and insulin challenges. In life with diabetes, especially if you’re on insulin, you deserve a CDE who you truly feel you can go to for support and knowledge and help! I wanted to share why I so appreciate my CDE because she is also someone anyone can work with across the globe. If you feel like the options in your area aren’t meeting your needs or you aren’t finding a CDE who really seems to provide the support and knowledge you’re looking for…then you’ve gotta know about Jennifer C. Smith. (Check her out at IntegratedDiabetes.com.) Yes, she has a great background: she’s a type 1 herself, a mother, an athlete, a pregnancy coach, a registered dietician, and of course, a certified diabetes education. But what makes her truly unique is how she works with her patients. Here are 5 things that I love about my CDE, Jennifer Smith: 1. She will never scold you or shake your finger at you for mistakes. Had a super high blood sugar last weekend because you very knowingly ate a ton pizza and while you did the best you could to take enough insulin, we all know pizza isn’t easy to juggle in the blood sugar. Many CDEs would look at your weekend high numbers and say, “Oh my god! What happened? You shouldn’t be eating pizza!” But Jenny will look at your high numbers and ask you about them merely to confirm whether or not you know why they’re high or if they’re the result of a potential insulin dosing issue that she could help you adjust. Instead of telling you to never eat pizza again, Jenny is going to help you Continue reading >>

Being A Cde

Being A Cde

The Credentialled Diabetes Educator® (CDE) is a registered trademark allowing the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) to define the conditions under which the term is used. The ADEA grants status as a Credentialled Diabetes Educator (CDE) in recognition of demonstrated experience and expertise in diabetes education and commitment to professional development and ongoing learning that meet the ADEA’s expected standards. Recognition as a CDE is ADEA’s assurance to people with or at risk of diabetes, their families, carers and health care providers that they can expect to receive quality diabetes education and advice when consulting a CDE. The ADEA recommends the CDE as the appropriately qualified provider of diabetes education. Credentialled Diabetes Educators are also the recognised by Medicare Australia and the Department of Veterans’ Affairs as well as by private health insurers as the providers of diabetes education. Credentialled Diabetes Educators already hold a professional health care qualification and have completed a post graduate certificate in diabetes education and care that has been accredited by the ADEA. Before gaining recognition as a CDE, they must complete a set minimum of clinical practice in diabetes education, participate in a mentoring partnership registered with the ADEA and have a referee report addressing the criteria of the National Core Competencies for Credentialled Diabetes Educators. Credentialled Diabetes Educators must demonstrate ongoing participation in professional development within the specialty of diabetes education in accordance with the ADEA Credentialling and Re-Credentialling Program to gain and maintain recognition as a CDE. All CDEs must apply to the ADEA to retain their CDE status every year. ADEA Credential Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Educator's Role In Teaching The Diabetic Patient

The Diabetes Educator's Role In Teaching The Diabetic Patient

Diabetes educators have become a necessary cost-effective addition to the health care team whose efforts are directed toward the improvement of the total care provided to the diabetic patient. The role of the nurse educator in clinical practice and in hospital teams is a new approach to improving the quality of patient education. The nurse educator has specific responsibilities in the evaluation of each diabetic patient. An assessment of not only what that individual knows about his illness and where his educational needs lie but also of each person's readiness to learn. Whereas the physician's contact time with each diabetic patient is limited, the nurse educator has the time to spend with the patient and family. One must listen to what each individual has to say about his diabetes and other problems and to start the teaching-learning process. The nurse educator must be skilled in this teaching-learning process and have a good background and understanding of diabetes, including diabetes complications and problems. Very importantly, the educator must have the capability and the responsibility to evaluate the effectiveness of the teaching and learning that are done. This evaluation provides proof that better education of the diabetic patient does provide improvement in patient self-care through a better understanding of his illness. Proper care and management reduce the frequency of office visits, telephone calls, and hospitalization. Finally, the educator must interpret, for eah diabetic patient, the research being done, and, when possible, encourage diabetic patients to become involved themselves, for they are the ones who reap the benefits from diabetes research. Continue reading >>

The Scope Of Practice, Standards Of Practice, And Standards Of Professional Performance For Diabetes Educators

The Scope Of Practice, Standards Of Practice, And Standards Of Professional Performance For Diabetes Educators

Introduction The Scope of Practice, Standards of Practice, and Standards of Professional Performance for Diabetes Educators has been developed by the AADE to define the scope, role, and minimal level of quality performance of the diabetes educator; to differentiate diabetes education as a distinct healthcare specialty; to promote diabetes self-management education and training (DSME/T) as an integral part of diabetes care; and to facilitate excellence. Representing the expertise and experience of a multidisciplinary task force of health professionals representative of the AADE membership and an extensive review process embracing a broad spectrum of practice areas, this document supports the specialty by: • Stimulating the process of peer review, • Promoting documentation of the outcomes of DSME/T, • Encouraging research to validate practice and improve quality DSME/T and diabetes care, • Engaging in a process of critical examination of current diabetes educator practice and professional performance, and • Complementing other practice-related documents that address the delivery of DSME/T by diabetes educators and roles of other healthcare practitioners who are members of the diabetes care team. Diabetes education is unique in that its practitioners come from a variety of health disciplines. Diabetes educators remain individually accountable to the standards set by the discipline and by national, state, local, and institutional regulations that define and guide professional practice. This document serves to guide diabetes educators’ practice regardless of their professional discipline. Background Living well with diabetes requires active, diligent, effective self-management of the disease.1 Self- management is an important concept to e Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Certified Diabetes Educators

Everything You Need To Know About Certified Diabetes Educators

In this article, we will explore what it takes to look for a Certified Diabetes Educator, where to look for one, and what questions to ask when you get there, among other things. We will also explore how to become a CDE, and what kind of degree, license, hours and examination that you will need to pass in order to become a Certified Diabetes Educator. Personal perspective on becoming a CDE My own story of becoming a Certified Diabetes Educator may help to illustrate the process of actually becoming a Certified Diabetes Educator. It is a process, and it is a challenge to get the 1,000 hours of diabetes education that is required. Many people with diabetes do enter careers in healthcare or related fields, and do become Certified Diabetes Educators. Their experience as a person with diabetes is very valuable to their client. I am a registered nurse, which is one of the licenses that you can hold in order to become a CDE. Degrees and licensure needed in order to become a CDE One must be in one of the following disciplines holding an active and current license which is unrestricted in the United States in order to become a Certified Diabetes Educator according to NCBDE (National Certification Board of Diabetes Educators): A clinical psychologist A registered nurse An occupational therapist An Optometrist A pharmacist A physical therapist A physician (M.D. or D.O.) A podiatrist A dietitian or dietitian nutritionist holding active registration with the Commission on Dietetic Registration A physician assistant holding active registration with the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants A clinical exercise professional holding active certification with American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) as a Certified Clinical Exercise Physiologist (ACSM CEP), previo Continue reading >>

The Crisis In Diabetes Education: How Can We Fix The Problems

The Crisis In Diabetes Education: How Can We Fix The Problems

Diabetes educators are no less than a lifeline for patients, providing vitalinsights into the self-care behaviors that keep diabetes in check: managingblood sugar, dosing medications and insulin, exercising, and understanding allthe numbers involved. Yet many patients never get referred to these specialists at all. Even whenthey do manage to get a doctor’s referral for diabetes education, insurance maycover only a few hours per year of this critical counseling – not nearly enoughto learn how to manage the disease for a lifetime. Ironically, certified diabetes educators (CDEs) are more overworked than ever,struggling to reach existing patients even as diabetes reaches epidemicproportions. According to the National Centers for Disease Control, diabetesdrains the U.S. economy of over $130 billion each year. That’s more than threetimes the annual amount spent on diabetes patients all across Europe. While new diabetes drugs and high-tech treatment devices are coming to marketfaster than ever, recruiting of new educators is almost at a standstill. This ishappening for two reasons: First, the current certification process essentiallyserves as a barrier to becoming a CDE. Second, health insurance companies simplydon’t pay for enough hours with a CDE, a policy that has led to the closure ofmany diabetes education centers. No matter how you slice it, the field of diabetes education is facing a crisis.There are only about 15,000 CDEs in the U.S., yet nearly 21 million Americansare already affected by diabetes, and the number is growing every day. Who willhelp all these patients manage their disease? In order to serve them all, everyeducator would have to see at least 1,400 people four times a year: this worksout to more than 22 people every single weekday. Why these discon Continue reading >>

5 Ways Diabetes Educators Can Boost Income

5 Ways Diabetes Educators Can Boost Income

Call it moonlighting, a la Bruce Willis and Cybill Shepherd in that '80's TV hit. Or, in a more professionally focused vein, call it a way to build on your skills to enhance your income. A presentation at the 2016 American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) annual meeting focused on how certified diabetes educators (CDEs) could earn extra income. EndocrineWeb (EW) caught up with the two presenters, EW Advisory Board Member Susan Weiner, MS, RDN, CDE, CDN, who has a private practice in New York, and Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, owner and clinical director of Integrated Diabetes Services in Philadelphia, to hear more about their ideas. Both Weiner and Scheiner have found a way to build a high demand for their writing, speaking, advisory, and related media savvy skills. The two were eager to share ideas on how they got started with projects that can be done after work, in the early morning, or over the weekend to bolster income. “Our presentation aimed to provide practical suggestions any diabetes professional could employ,” said Ms. Weiner, the 2015 AADE Diabetes Educator of the Year. For an ambitious CDE, or any health professional (for that matter), there are five key services that Ms. Weiner and Mr. Scheiner, AADE's 2014 Diabetes Educator of the Year, to explore to attract more income: 1. Lend yourself out as a freelance writer. "There are so many more opportunities to write," says Mr. Scheiner, who authored Think Like a Pancreas: A Practical Guide to Managing Diabetes with Insulin (2012), citing the explosion of online sites in addition to the more traditional opportunities, such as print magazines and newsletters. Another option is the American Diabetes Association (ADA) often seeks out professional writers. Many professional and disease specific organizations n Continue reading >>

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