diabetestalk.net

What Does A Certified Diabetes Educator Do

Pharmacists Can Make A Difference As Certified Diabetes Educators

Pharmacists Can Make A Difference As Certified Diabetes Educators

Pharmacists Can Make a Difference as Certified Diabetes Educators Are You a Certified Diabetes Educator? Do You Want to Be? Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) can make a tremendous difference in the lives of people who have diabetes. Many pharmacists are unaware that pharmacists comprise a significant proportion of CDEs, with their numbers exceeded only by nurses and dietitians. Increasingly, pharmacists are seeking certification in this field to differentiate themselves from other pharmacists, develop niche level expertise, and provide better care to patients who have diabetes . In a recent article, the journal Diabetes Educator salutes pharmacists who perform in this role. In it, a team from Purdue University in Indianapolis, Indiana examines the current state of pharmacist CDE practice. These researchers collected crosssectional, nationwide data by sending an electronic survey to all 1275 CDE pharmacists in the United States. Their goal was to determine where these pharmacists practice, and what their practices as CDEs entail. Of great interest to these researchers was pharmacists perceptions of the CDE credential's benefits and barriers. With 462 survey responsesa 36.2% response ratethe researchers were able to analyze a number of factors. Pharmacists (n=311) who carry this credential were most likely to work in a hospital or health system. Next, academia was a common practice setting (n=100), followed by managed care (n=44) and other sites. Of 460 pharmacists who answered a question about their plans to recredential as CDEs, a full 440 indicated that they would. Only 20 said that they would not seek recredentialing, with 8 of the 20 planning to retire before their credential expired. This indicates tremendous satisfaction. The researchers note that pharmacists wh Continue reading >>

Why Do I Need To See A Diabetes Educator?

Why Do I Need To See A Diabetes Educator?

Why Do I Need to See a Diabetes Educator? By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 7/9/2010 Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects more than 23 million people in the United States. If managed well, people with diabetes can live normal, healthy lives. However, the many devastating effects of uncontrolled or poorly controlled diabetes are fairly well known: Diabetes, which increases a person's chances of heart attack or stroke by 200% to 400%, respectively, is the seventh leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult blindness, kidney failure and lower-limb amputation. But with proper management and control through daily food, fitness, medication and lifestyle choices, people with diabetes can reduce their risk of diabetes related complications. That said, diabetes is largely a "self-care" disease, which means that most of the time, you are in charge of many day-to-day decisions that affect your condition. This responsibility puts an individual with diabetes in the drivers seat of their personal care teamand that's a lot of pressure! So what's the most important tool you need to successfully manage diabetes? Knowledge. There is a lot of information available about diabetes. In the information age, there is certainly no shortage of diabetes related books, cookbooks, websites, and magazines. Unfortunately, information about diabetes is not always credible and some of the information out there is just flat-out incorrect or bad advice. How do you decide whether the information you read or hear about diabetes is safe and reliable? Fortunately, you dont have to do this on your own. A diabetes educator can help! A Certified Diabetes Educator is a qualified professionaltypically, a registered nurse, registered dietitian, or a pharmacist th Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educator (cde) Salary

Certified Diabetes Educator (cde) Salary

Job Description for Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) As the name implies, certified diabetes educator (CDE) is a position with specific certification requirements. In addition to being a certified diabetic specialist, many positions have further requirements. Common requirements include being a registered nurse (RN), Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) certifications, a bachelor's or master's degree in nursing, a bachelor's or master's degree in nutrition, or other related training. In some cases, these requirements are mandatory before applying, while some employers will provide employees with the opportunity to complete these requirements during their first few years of work. The CDE educates patients on dietary needs and general health. This may include specific diets aimed to treat medical conditions or diets geared towards general well being to prevent disease. Planning diets and following up with patients to ensure motivation and dedication are a part of the job. They must also serve as a general community resource . This includes regularly communicating with patients, providing educational materials to those interested, and keeping records of all patient interaction. General skills required in this position include communication, computer, and organizational skills; all of these help employee effectively share knowledge of diet and nutrition with patients. The work environment is indoors, typically in an office or hospital setting, while work hours are limited to general business operating hours. Risks and physical requirements are generally limited to basic office tasks. (Copyright 2017 PayScale.com) Assess nutritional needs, diet restrictions and current health plans to develop and implement dietary-care plans and provide nutritional counseling. Educate Continue reading >>

Q & A With Debra Ollanketo, Rn And Certified Diabetes Educator (cde)

Q & A With Debra Ollanketo, Rn And Certified Diabetes Educator (cde)

What does a Diabetes Educator do? A CDE provides education to help an individual learn diabetes care skills, also called diabetes self management training. This includes teaching about the condition and its treatment; medications, blood sugar testing, exercise, nutrition, preventing and managing complications, behavior change, and coping skills. Diabetes educators are licensed healthcare professionals, including registered nurses, registered dietitians, and pharmacists. A Certified diabetes educator has earned the CDE credential which demonstrates specialized knowledge in the field of diabetes education. The CDE must stay current in diabetes care and be re-certified every five years. When a patient comes to see you, what information should they bring? It’s important to know any medications and supplements, such as vitamins and herbal supplements the individual is taking. Patients should carry a current list of medications and show it to every healthcare provider they meet with. If the person has a blood sugar meter, we ask them to bring it with them as well. We will ask medical history questions and we usually receive information about lab results from the patient’s doctor when they are referred to our service. Diabetes self management training is usually covered by Medicare and most insurance plans, however, deductibles and payment varies widely between insurance plans. The person can call their insurance company to find out about coverage for diabetes education. An important factor in being covered by Medicare is that the Diabetes program is recognized by the American Diabetes Association. Memorial Medical Center is an ADA recognized program and must be recognized every 4 years. What are three questions patients should consider asking during their visit? What type Continue reading >>

What Does A Diabetes Educator Do?

What Does A Diabetes Educator Do?

By Patty Cebulko, manager of The Health Plan’s Disease Management department. Patty is a Registered Nurse and Certified Diabetes Educator, and works to educate and support people to understand and live well with diabetes. November is Diabetes Awareness Month, and November 6 through 12 is National Diabetes Educators Week. This week is set aside to give special recognition to the nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and other licensed health care professionals who specialize in educating people with diabetes about their condition. The training, counseling, and support that diabetes educators provide to patients is known as diabetes education or diabetes self-management training (DSMT). What does a diabetes educator do? Empowers and assists patients to modify lifestyle and adopt healthy self-care behaviors Trains patients and caregivers to use diabetes devices, such as blood glucose meters, insulin pens and pumps, and continuous glucose monitors Teaches problem-solving strategies and skills to help people with diabetes live healthy, active lifestyles Provides nutrition education that is individualized for each person and allows people with diabetes to eat “regular” foods Works with physicians and other members of your health care team to help manage medication regimens based on physician-directed protocols Helps you develop emotional coping skills Some diabetes educators carry the title of Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE). A CDE is a health professional who possesses comprehensive knowledge of and experience in prediabetes, diabetes prevention, and diabetes management. To become certified requires years of practice-based experience in diabetes education, along with specific knowledge and education requirements, along with a written examination with minimum passing requi Continue reading >>

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Go to: One in every three Americans currently has or is at risk to develop diabetes mellitus.1 Worldwide, the number of individuals with diabetes is growing at an unprecedented rate and is expected to surpass 550 million by 2030.2 Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is actually a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels that result from defects in the body’s ability to produce and/or use insulin. The hyperglycemia resulting from the excessive amounts of circulating glucose can be aggravated by exogenous factors, such as food consumption, physical activity, inflammation, medications, and stress. The chronic, progressive nature of diabetes necessitates ongoing medical care; it benefits from timely access to patient self-management education and support to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications.3 Adequately responding to and managing circulating glucose requires an assortment of elements, including an ongoing assessment of pharmacology, nutritional interventions, and monitoring. Historically, diabetes was depicted as a condition managed by diet, exercise, and medication. Seemingly straightforward, diabetes management has always been challenging. Changes in each of these treatment elements over the past 2 decades have increased the overall complexity of the disease’s management. Nutritional intake remains the foundation of diabetes management. However, the diabetes diet has shifted away from a physician-prescribed, calorie-restricted exchange diet toward an individualized meal plan that takes into account a patient’s cultural background and nutritional likes and dislikes. Exercise, which is still widely recognized as an anchor to diabetes management, is now carefully linked to the patient’s routine so as to maximiz Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Career Path Where Are You?

Your Diabetes Career Path Where Are You?

Your Diabetes Career Path Where are You? Are youenteringthe field of Diabetes and currently: Ahealthcare professional not yet working in the diabetes field Working in the field of Diabetes Education Working toward becoming a Certified Diabetes Educator* Welcome! You are joining a growing number of caring healthcare professionals participating in the rapidly expanding field of Diabetes Education. How do I become a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE)? See our 10 Steps to Succeed for a step-by-step guide to planning for your CDE exam. According to the National Certification Board for Diabetes Education (NCBDE) you need to meet the following criteria: Have your professional license for at least 2 years as a RN, RD, PT, PharmD, PA, MD (and others) Accumulate 1000 hours of diabetes self-management teaching experience to take the CDE exam Need to complete 15 hours of diabetes related continuing education within 2 years of taking the exam. Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Educator For Type 2 Diabetes

A Diabetes Educator For Type 2 Diabetes

Learning to live with type 2 diabetes can take some time and adjustments. Although they may not know it, people with diabetes usually have a great resource who can be a lifeline: the diabetes educator. Type 2 Diabetes: What Is a Diabetes Educator? Kathy Honick, RN, CDE, a diabetes educator at Barnes Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, explains that a certified diabetes educator can be a registered nurse, registered dietitian, pharmacist, registered nurse-practitioner, or physician's assistant. She says her goal is to help people with diabetes — and also those who are at risk of developing diabetes — learn about the disease and how to live with it successfully. Health professionals, like nurses, who want to become a certified diabetes educator must log many hours of direct interaction with diabetes patients over a period of two years, and then pass a test administered by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators. They then must be recertified every five years, proving that they’ve been keeping up-to-date on diabetes education and changes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), there are about 15,000 certified diabetes educators, like Honick, in the United States. Type 2 Diabetes: Why See a Diabetes Educator? Doctors and nurses can give you basic information about diabetes, but it’s a chronic and complicated disease that needs a more long-term support system. Honick notes that people who participate in a diabetes education program have much better chances of lowering their overall blood sugar than those who don't, according to the ADA. Karen, 54, a mammogram technician in North Carolina, found that until she saw a diabetes educator, “after several years of gradually increasing doses, I felt like I was rattling with all the pills inside me. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Educators And You

Diabetes Educators And You

Credentialled Diabetes Educators are specialists in diabetes. They are health professionals who have completed further study to focus their efforts on helping people with diabetes self-manage their diabetes effectively and prevent complications. A diabetes educator can be the first point of call when you are wanting more information, support and/or motivation in the management of your diabetes and the link between other health professionals. They have in-depth knowledge on all aspects of diabetes and can recognise when you need to see other members of your health care team for example, an optometrist or podiatrist. When should I see a diabetes educator? Credentialled Diabetes Educators can be there with you the entire way through your journey. When you are first diagnosed, Credentialled Diabetes Educators explain what diabetes is and provide individualised advice on how to get your blood glucose levels within the appropriate target range. They will also help you organise tests and screenings for diabetes complications. This will vary depending on your diabetes, your lifestyle and your age. Credentialled Diabetes Educators can also help you when your blood glucose levels fluctuate. According to Credentialled Diabetes Educator, Rachel McKeown, this could be changing when you are feeling stressed or anxious. “Lifestyle changes and events like exams, weddings, divorce, somebody close to you dying, can send up blood glucose levels,” Rachel said. “The main aim of a Credentialled Diabetes Educator is to empower the person that has diabetes to self-manage their diabetes through knowledge, motivation and support.” Who should see a diabetes educator? Everyone should see a diabetes educator even people with pre-diabetes. Credentialled Diabetes Educators can provide you wit Continue reading >>

What Is A Diabetes Educator?

What Is A Diabetes Educator?

Because diabetes is complicated and overwhelming, a diabetes educator can be an important member of your health care team. These trained professionals teach you what diabetes can do to your body and how you can avoid issues that go along with the condition. They can help you manage your sugar levels, avoid complications, and live well with diabetes. What Is a Diabetes Educator? They can be nurses or other health professionals who have specialized expertise in diabetes and lots of experience working with people who have it. They must pass an exam to become a certified diabetes educator, and they must renew their credentials every 5 years. This helps make sure that they stay up-to-date on the latest findings and breakthroughs. Your diabetes educator will help you learn to take in stride all the things in your day-to-day life that can help control the disease -- like exercise, nutrition, medications, and checking your blood sugar. They may also work with your family so they understand your needs better and can be there to support you. Does Diabetes Education Really Work? Yes, it does. For example, it helps you keep good blood sugar levels. There's research to suggest that diabetes education can lower your risk of complications like nerve and kidney damage, which helps you avoid dialysis and gives you a better quality of life. Knowing what's going on with your body also helps you feel more in control of your health. One study of more than 1,200 people who got four 30-minute, one-on-one sessions with diabetes educators had impressive results. Folks in the study learned about important self-care strategies, like: Healthy eating Exercise Medication Self-monitoring Easing stress Dealing with potential problems They also had the chance to participate in group sessions. After 15 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Counselor Education Requirements And Career Information

Diabetes Counselor Education Requirements And Career Information

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a diabetes counselor or educator. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as details about degrees, job duties and certification to find out if this is the career for you. A diabetes counselor, who is typically a healthcare professional, helps people adjust to life with diabetes. Either an undergraduate or graduate degree may be required, as it varies by employer. Certification is available to become an official diabetes educator. Essential Information Diabetes counselors or educators work with patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes and counsel them on lifestyle changes to help them manage the disease. They may go over proper nutrition, exercise routines, blood glucose monitoring and medication dosages. A bachelor's degree in a healthcare field is a minimum requirement for these careers, though many diabetes counselors or educators have graduate degrees and certification. Required Education Bachelor's degree at minimum; graduate degrees are common Certification Voluntary Projected Job Growth (2014-2024)* 12% for all health educators Average Annual Salary (2015)* $56,690 for all health educators Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Diabetes Counselor Education Requirements Diabetes counselors should be healthcare professionals, such as clinical psychologists, social workers, physical therapists, dietitians, physicians or registered nurses (RNs), who are also certified diabetes educators or are eligible for certification. Education requirements vary by profession, but a bachelor's degree is usually the minimum requirement. For many qualifying healthcare professions, a graduate degree is required. Healthcare professionals need to be licensed or certified in their profession and licensing requiremen Continue reading >>

How To Become A Certified Diabetes Educator

How To Become A Certified Diabetes Educator

After receiving the diagnosis of diabetes, many patients, myself included, feel a strong desire to somehow integrate their illness with their professional career path. Because let’s face it, if you’re going to live with a disease day in and day out, you might as well find a way to make some money off of it, right?! There are certainly many avenues to travel down and options for potential workplace settings range from pharmaceutical companies, to non-profit organizations, and everything imaginable in between. It seems the opportunities to combine one’s chronic illness with their professional life and future career is limitless! One of the first major diabetes career paths that comes to mind when I think of working in the diabetes sphere is that of a certified diabetes educator (CDE). An integral part of the healthcare team, becoming a CDE is an excellent career choice for a person looking to combine patient interaction with extensive diabetes knowledge. Though there is quite a bit of education and professional experience within the field required, this is a role that puts you on the front lines of diabetes education and patient empowerment. With many initial degree options to choose from, there is an opportunity to explore the career track most in line with your specific and unique interests. What Is a CDE? The National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) describes a certified diabetes educator as a “health professional who possesses comprehensive knowledge of and experience in prediabetes, diabetes prevention, and management.” These professionals provide self-management education and support so that people can better understand and cope with the condition they are living with. Diabetes education is recognized by most health insurance plans and i Continue reading >>

Canadian Diabetes Educator Certification Board - What Is A Cde?

Canadian Diabetes Educator Certification Board - What Is A Cde?

A Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) is a health professional, committed to excellence in diabetes education, who has a sound knowledge base in diabetes care/management and education processes, as well as good communication skills and who has passed the Canadian Diabetes Educator's Certification Board (CDECB) exam. The certification process for diabetes educators is designed for eligible health professionals who are currently practicing in diabetes education in Canada. The mandate of the Canadian Diabetes Educator Certification Board is to provide a voluntary, accessible, valid and relevant process that recognizes multidisciplinary diabetes education specialists who are engaged in promoting the national standards of care for individuals and communities affected by diabetes. Certification as a diabetes educator recognizes experience and excellence in diabetes education and verifies that an individual possesses the knowledge, skill and abilities to practice effectively and safely within their professions scope of practice and according to the Canadian Standards for Diabetes Education. The Canadian Diabetes Educator Certification Board is responding to questions from healthcare professionals including Chiropodists and Registered Practical Nurses, who are involved in diabetes education as part of a multi disciplinary team and has received requests for the opportunity to achieve Certified Diabetes Educator status to support the work that they are doing with persons with diabetes and their families. Beginning in 1991, healthcare professionals who are licensed by a Regulatory Body in Canada and have accumulated 800 hours of diabetes education experience over the previous 3 years encompassing a broad range of established competencies, may apply to write the Diabetes Educator Ce Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educators (cdes): What You Should Know

Certified Diabetes Educators (cdes): What You Should Know

We get a lot of questions about Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) – what they can offer patients, how to find one, and even how to become a diabetes educator yourself if interested. We’ve queried some top diabetes education experts in the country to compile this at-a-glance guide. Read on for practical information about the world of CDEs, along with lists of the Top Tips for Patients to Make the Most of Their CDE Appointments, and Top Things You Should Know About Becoming a CDE. A huge thank you to the following expert contributors: Deborah Greenwood, Diabetes Clinical Specialist and 2015 president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Jane K. Dickinson, RN, PhD, CDE, Coordinator of the Columbia University Master’s in Diabetes Education and Management program, and person with type 1 diabetes herself Jennifer Smith, CDE, Registered Dietitian & Director of Lifestyle and Nutrition at Integrated Diabetes Services, also living with type 1 diabetes herself Marissa Town, RN, CDE and a type 1 diabetes patient too, who was the inspiration for the Children With Diabetes (CWD) community Diabetes Educator Basics What is a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE)? CDEs are healthcare professionals trained specifically to coach patients with diabetes through their own self-care. This means coaching on glucose testing, medication dosing, insulin delivery, results logging and more. Some CDEs even have specialized training as insulin pump educators, focusing on helping patients get set up on those advanced devices. What Does a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) Do? CDEs work with patients and their families to teach diabetes self-management skills, and help with everyday challenges that doctors often don’t have time to address. They work in hospitals, clinics and sm Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educator

Certified Diabetes Educator

A certified diabetes educator (CDE) is a health care professional who is specialized and certified to teach people with diabetes how to manage their condition.[1][2] The CDE is an asset for those who need to learn the tools and skills necessary to control their blood sugar and avoid long-term complications due to hyperglycemia. Unlike an endocrinologist, the CDE can spend as much time with a patient as is needed for education and emotional support. Typically the CDE is also a nurse, dietitian, clinical nutrition professional, exercise physiologist, pharmacist, or social worker who has further specialized in diabetes education and care management. Formal education and years of practical experience are required, in addition to a formal examination, before a diabetes educator is certified. CDEs can work independently for health clinics, medical practices, pharmacies, and for companies that provide diabetes education. Certification[edit] In the US, certification is awarded by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators.[3][4] In Canada, certification is awarded by the Canadian Diabetes Educator Certification Board (CDECB). In the Philippines, any allied health care professional may apply to be a diabetes educator after taking special courses from the Philippine Association of Diabetes Educators (PADE) or Association of Diabetes Nurse Educators of the Philippines (ADNEP). Qualified graduates of diabetes educator courses can practice as professional diabetes educators in any Center for Diabetes Care (CDC) clinic network. The Diabetes Nurse Educator (DNE) and Certified Lay Educator (CLE) are the equivalent of the CDE in the Philippines. [edit] Jump up ^ The American Diabetes Association Jump up ^ Center for Diabetes Care Jump up ^ American Association of Diabetes E Continue reading >>

More in diabetes