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What Does A Blood Glucose Meter Measure?

Meters: Does Your Device Measure Up?

Meters: Does Your Device Measure Up?

Download our latest printable product listings. Think of picking out a blood glucose meter the same way you would choose a car. You might consider cost first and then compare features to narrow down your options until you find the one that works best for you. You may even be able to sit with a diabetes educator and look over a number of meters to get a feel for them, says Molly McElwee-Malloy, RN, CDE, CPT, patient care manager in diabetes education at the University of Virginia Health System and a spokeswoman for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. The main thing people think about is cost, she says. But I think you should [also] think about something that is really going to do the most work for you. If youre stumped by all of the features to consider, focus on five main factors: ease of use, size and shape, reimbursement, accuracy, and download ability. Meters are typically affordable (most are in the range of $10 to $50) and are often discounted or free with coupons. The real cost with testing your blood glucose comes with the strips, says McElwee-Malloy. Test strips retail for anywhere between less than 50cents and $2 a strip, depending on the technology, and that can get expensive if you check your blood glucose multiple times a day. The cost of diabetes has never been higher, says endocrinologist Timothy Bailey, MD, FACE, CPI, director of AMCR Institute in Escondido, California, and a clinical associate professor at the University of CaliforniaSan Diego School of Medicine. A good way to save? Call your insurance company to find out which meters and strips are preferred (typically listed on the companys formulary). The cost of preferred meters and test strips will be covered at the most benefit to you. You can still get a meter that is not preferred by Continue reading >>

Glucose Meter

Glucose Meter

Four generations of blood glucose meter, c. 1993–2005. Sample sizes vary from 30 to 0.3 μl. Test times vary from 5 seconds to 2 minutes (modern meters typically provide results in 5 seconds). A glucose meter is a medical device for determining the approximate concentration of glucose in the blood. It can also be a strip of glucose paper dipped into a substance and measured to the glucose chart. It is a key element of home blood glucose monitoring (HBGM) by people with diabetes mellitus or hypoglycemia. A small drop of blood, obtained by pricking the skin with a lancet, is placed on a disposable test strip that the meter reads and uses to calculate the blood glucose level. The meter then displays the level in units of mg/dl or mmol/l. Since approximately 1980, a primary goal of the management of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been achieving closer-to-normal levels of glucose in the blood for as much of the time as possible, guided by HBGM several times a day. The benefits include a reduction in the occurrence rate and severity of long-term complications from hyperglycemia as well as a reduction in the short-term, potentially life-threatening complications of hypoglycemia. History[edit] Leland Clark presented his first paper about the oxygen electrode, later named the Clark electrode, on 15 April 1956, at a meeting of the American Society for Artificial Organs during the annual meetings of the Federated Societies for Experimental Biology.[1][2] In 1962, Clark and Ann Lyons from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital developed the first glucose enzyme electrode. This biosensor was based on a thin layer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on an oxygen electrode. Thus, the readout was the amount of oxygen consumed by GOx during the enzymatic reaction with the substra Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

With Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), you get a more complete picture of your glucose levels, which can lead to better treatment decisions and better glucose control. Without diabetes, your body tracks glucose levels all day and night to ensure the right amount of insulin is released at the right time. To successfully manage diabetes, a monitoring system is needed to consistently check your glucose levels. The most common glucose monitoring solutions are blood glucose meters and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems. Sensor overtape not shown in depiction How Does CGM Work? CGM is a way to measure glucose levels in real-time throughout the day and night. A tiny electrode called a glucose sensor is inserted under the skin to measure glucose levels in tissue fluid. It is connected to a transmitter that sends the information via wireless radio frequency to a monitoring and display device. The device can detect and notify you if your glucose is reaching a high or low limit. The latest Medtronic CGM systems can actually alert you before you reach your glucose limits. CGM systems usually consist of a glucose sensor, a transmitter, and a small external monitor to view your glucose levels. MiniMed insulin pumps have built-in CGM so the information can be conveniently seen on your pump screen. The CGM monitor or insulin pump is small, discreet, and easy-to-wear. It can be attached to your belt, hidden in your pocket, or placed under your clothing. This component will show your current glucose levels and your historical glucose trends. It also notifies you before you reach your low or high glucose limits and if your glucose level rises or falls too quickly. The CGM transmitter is a small, lightweight device that attaches to the glucose sensor, gathers your glucose data, Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Many types of blood glucose meters are available. Here's how to choose one that fits your needs and lifestyle. If you have diabetes, you'll likely need a blood glucose meter to measure and display the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. Exercise, food, medications, stress and other factors affect your blood glucose level. Using a blood glucose meter can help you better manage your diabetes by tracking any fluctuations in your blood glucose level. Many types of blood glucose meters are available, from basic models to more-advanced meters with multiple features and options. The cost of blood glucose meters and test strips varies, as does insurance coverage. Study your options before deciding which model to buy. Choosing the right meter When selecting a blood glucose meter, it can help to know the basics of how they work. To use most blood glucose meters, you first insert a test strip into the device. Then you prick a clean fingertip with a special needle (lancet) to get a drop of blood. You carefully touch the test strip to the blood and wait for a blood glucose reading to appear on the screen. When used and stored properly, blood glucose meters are generally accurate in how they measure glucose. They differ in the type and number of features they offer. Here are several factors to consider when choosing a blood glucose meter: Insurance coverage. Check with your insurance provider for coverage details. Some insurance providers limit coverage to specific models or limit the total number of test strips allowed. Cost. Meters vary in price. Be sure to factor in the cost of test strips. Ease of use and maintenance. Some meters are easier to use than others. Are both the meter and test strips comfortable and easy to hold? Can you easily see the numbers on the screen? How e Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meters And Strips

Blood Glucose Meters And Strips

What They Do: Blood glucose meters (BGMs) measure a person’s blood sugar level. To use a meter, users insert a test strip, prick their fingers with a lancing device to draw blood, and then apply a small drop of blood onto a test strip. The meter then gives a blood glucose reading in mg/dl (US standard) or mmol/l (European standard). A blood sugar level of under 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/l) is typically considered hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). A level of over 180 mg/dl (10 mmol/l) is considered hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are potentially dangerous situations where blood sugars are out of normal range and can be addressed using fast-acting carbohydrates (in the case of a low value) or insulin (in the case of a high value). What Supplies Do I Need? To monitor your blood sugar, these supplies are required: Test strips Lancing instrument (used to prick the finger for blood) Blood glucose meter Some meters are coupled with smartphone apps to monitor data Useful Links: TEST DRIVE: Bayer Contour USB Meter – An in-depth look at this BGM that can plug directly into a computer, next-generation update here. TEST DRIVE: Telcare, Freestyle InsuLinx, and LifesScan OneTouch Verio IQ Meters – Adam compares these three popular meters and provides his favorite aspects of each in this test drive article. TEST DRIVE: Sanofi's iBGStar Meter – A detailed analysis of the iBGStar meter, which can connect to an iPhone/iPod Touch. TEST DRIVE: The LifeScan OneTouch VerioSync Meter and OneTouch Reveal App – Adam test drives this meter, which can wirelessly send data to your favorite Apple devices. Roche's Accu-Chek Aviva Expert the First-Ever BGM with Built-in Bolus Calculator – A brief update on Roche’s new and exciting advancement for the BGM field. L Continue reading >>

How Blood Glucose Meters Work

How Blood Glucose Meters Work

Source: Web exclusive: May 2011 Using a blood glucose meter If you have diabetes, a blood glucose meter could well be your new best friend, and critical to successfully managing your disease. “A glucose meter is a tool to help know where your blood sugar is at, and what affects it,” says Karen McDermaid, a diabetes educator in Moosomin, Sask. There are lots of different models of meters’also called blood glucose monitors or glucometers’but they all work the same way: They detect the level of sugar in your blood, and give you the results almost instantly. It all comes down to chemistry Wondering how a glucose meter works? Remember high-school science class? First, you use a lancet to pierce your skin and apply a drop of blood to the meter’s test strip. Next, a series of chemical reactions takes place between the sugar in your blood and substances on the test strip, creating ferrocyanide. An electrical current flows from the ferrocyanide to the glucose meter, which uses the strength of this current to measure the amount of glucose in your blood. The meter converts it to the digital number that you record in your logbook. How not to slip up It’s possible to get an inaccurate reading if you don’t use your meter properly. But there are steps you can take to reduce that risk. Start by washing your hands and the test area of your skin with soap and water. Dirt and residue on your skin can skew the results. Pay attention to your test strips. If they’ve been exposed to extreme temperatures or they’re out of date, they may not be up to the job. If your meter requires the code number from your test strip container, make sure you’ve entered this properly. And be sure to test a big enough drop of blood’but don’t apply more blood after you’ve already done it Continue reading >>

How Do Glucometers Work?

How Do Glucometers Work?

Through a pinprick several times a day — but what if diabetics could tell their blood-sugar levels anytime, by glancing at a tattoo?… Monitoring blood sugar levels is a pain for the diabetic — both figuratively and literally. Several times a day, they prick a finger to obtain a blood droplet and apply it to a plastic strip that’s inserted in a glucometer — a hand-held device that tells them if their glucose level is high, low, or right on target. It’s usually the job of the pancreas to keep track of sugar levels and to secrete glucagon and insulin to keep them at 100 or so milligrams per deciliter of blood. But for diabetics — either because their pancreas doesn’t function properly or because their body can’t process the hormones it secretes — glucose testing is a do-it-yourself proposition. And a crucial one. Blood-sugar checks show if it’s time to inject a few units of insulin — or grab a lifesaving snack. That’s where the glucometer comes in. “Current glucometers use test strips containing glucose oxidase, an enzyme that reacts to glucose in the blood droplet, and an interface to an electrode inside the meter,” explains Michael Strano, the Charles and Hilda Roddey Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT. “When the strip is inserted into the meter, the flux of the glucose reaction generates an electrical signal,” he says. “The glucometer is calibrated so the number appearing in its digital readout corresponds to the strength of the electrical current: The more glucose in the sample, the higher the number.” Periodic tests via glucometer play an important part in the diabetic’s treatment plan, but current models fall short in giving a true picture of glucose fluctuations in real time. “The complications of diabetes st Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Guide

Blood Glucose Meter Guide

Tweet Keeping an accurate idea of your blood glucose levels is an integral part of successful diabetes management. Blood glucose meters allow you to do this. Choosing the right meter will depend on the products available to you, the cost of test strips (if you need to buy you our own), NHS prescription availability and the most suitable device for your individual requirements. Some blood glucose meters can also check for the presence of ketones which is useful for people with type 1 diabetes or those who are otherwise susceptible to ketoacidosis. Compare blood glucose meters The following independent blood glucose meter reviews detail the types of blood glucose meters available in the UK, who they are made by, the range of features each meter brings and how to get one. In addition, you can read user reviews or leave your own review. Your healthcare team should be able to advise you on how many times per day you need to check your blood sugar levels. Learn more about the recommended blood glucose level ranges as advised by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). You can also read reviews for insulin pumps and CGMs. Discuss your options with your healthcare team and GP. If you are buying your own meter and need to buy your own test strips, make sure to compare prices of test strips and lancets as it is these supplies that are the biggest cost associated with blood glucose testing. Some people prefer to have more than one blood glucose monitor - one for home and one for the office, or one for home and one for travelling. How easy are blood glucose meters to use? This will depend on the design interface favoured by the manufacturer, but some blood glucose monitors are definitely easier to use than others. Continue reading >>

Accuracy Of Blood Glucose Meters: Get The Down Low

Accuracy Of Blood Glucose Meters: Get The Down Low

Every blood glucose meter claims that its accurate. But what does accurate really mean in terms of blood glucose (BG)? A. Does accurate mean that your blood glucose meter will show you the true BG? B. Does accurate mean that your blood glucose meter will show the same BG each time if you test multiple times from the same finger stick? C. Does accurate mean that your blood glucose meter will show the same BG as a different blood glucose meter if you test from the same finger stick? No at-home blood glucose meter will show a true BG only a lab test can do that. (And actually, to be very technically correct, there is theoretically a true BG value, but its impossible to measure thats where statistics come in!) We can only estimate what the true BG value is by taking a sample. In order to be considered accurate and thus approved for use in at-home testing scenarios, the FDA requires that blood glucose meters provide: 99% of blood glucose measurements within 20% of lab results 95% of blood glucose measurements within 15% of lab results This literally translates to: if your true BG value (measured in a lab test) was 100 mg/dL, your blood glucose meter could show as low as 80 mg/dL or as high as 120 mg/dL, and the FDA would consider either number accurate because both 80 mg/dL and 120 mg/dL are results that fall within that 20% range of lab results. This is called variance (or the amount of measurement error that the FDA allows in order to consider the reading accurate) and the variance gets larger as your true BG gets larger. For example, if your true BG value (again, measured in a lab) was 400 mg/dL, your blood glucose meter could show as low as 320 mg/dL or as high as 480 mg/dL. Even with that 160-point spread, the FDA would still consider either number (and all numbers in Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Choosing And Using Your Glucose Meter

Diabetes: Choosing And Using Your Glucose Meter

The process of monitoring one's own blood glucose with a glucose meter is often referred to as self-monitoring of blood glucose or "SMBG." To test for glucose with a typical glucose meter, place a small sample of blood on a disposable "test strip" and place the strip in the meter. The test strips are coated with chemicals (glucose oxidase, dehydrogenase, or hexokinase) that combine with glucose in blood. The meter measures how much glucose is present. Meters do this in different ways. Some measure the amount of electricity that can pass through the sample. Others measure how much light reflects from it. The meter displays the glucose level as a number. Several new models can record and store a number of test results. Some models can connect to personal computers to store test results or print them out. Choosing a Glucose Meter At least 25 different meters are commercially available. They differ in several ways including: Amount of blood needed for each test Testing speed Overall size Ability to store test results in memory Cost of the meter Cost of the test strips used Newer meters often have features that make them easier to use than older models. Some meters allow you to get blood from places other than your fingertip (alternative site testing). Some new models have automatic timing, error codes and signals, or barcode readers to help with calibration. Some meters have a large display screen or spoken instructions for people with visual impairments. Using Your Glucose Meter Diabetes care should be designed for each individual patient. Some patients may need to test (monitor) more often than others do. How often you use your glucose meter should be based on the recommendation of your health care provider. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is recommended for all p Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood sugar testing is an important part of diabetes care. Find out when to test your blood sugar level, how to use a testing meter, and more. If you have diabetes, self-testing your blood sugar (blood glucose) can be an important tool in managing your treatment plan and preventing long-term complications of diabetes. You can test your blood sugar at home with a portable electronic device (glucose meter) that measures sugar level in a small drop of your blood. Why test your blood sugar Blood sugar testing — or self-monitoring blood glucose — provides useful information for diabetes management. It can help you: Judge how well you're reaching overall treatment goals Understand how diet and exercise affect blood sugar levels Understand how other factors, such as illness or stress, affect blood sugar levels Monitor the effect of diabetes medications on blood sugar levels Identify blood sugar levels that are high or low When to test your blood sugar Your doctor will advise you on how often you should check your blood sugar level. In general, the frequency of testing depends on the type of diabetes you have and your treatment plan. Type 1 diabetes. Your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing four to eight times a day if you have type 1 diabetes. You may need to test before meals and snacks, before and after exercise, before bed, and occasionally during the night. You may also need to check your blood sugar level more often if you are ill, change your daily routine or begin a new medication. Type 2 diabetes. If you take insulin to manage type 2 diabetes, your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing two or more times a day, depending on the type and amount of insulin you need. Testing is usually recommended before meals, and sometimes before bedtime. If you manage type 2 Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

Glucometer Units Of Measure

Glucometer Units Of Measure

Some brands of glucometers have a switch or set-up option, allowing the user to perform testing using either mmol/l (millimoles/liter-world standard measuring unit) or mg/dl (milligrams/deciliter-traditional measuring unit) measurements. While many countries have adopted the mmol/L world standard, the United States and many other countries still use the traditional mg/dl unit of measure; many scientific journals have moved to using the mmol/L world standard. [1] Making sure your meter is set to measure blood glucose in the common form for your country can avoid possible misinterpretation of readings. [2] Continue reading >>

How To Test Blood Sugar | Accu-chek

How To Test Blood Sugar | Accu-chek

The steps are similar for many meters, and generally look like this: Wash and dry your handsusing warm water may help the blood flow.1 Turn on the meter and prepare a test strip as outlined in your owner's booklet. Many Accu-Chek meters turn on automatically when a strip is inserted. Choose your spotdon't check from the same finger all the time. Using the side of the fingertip may be less painful than the pads.1 Prepare the lancing device according to the user guide provided, then lance your fingertip or other approved site to get a drop of blood.2 Touch and hold the test strip opening to the drop until it has absorbed enough blood to begin the test. View your test result and take the proper steps if your blood sugar is high or low, based on your healthcare professionals' recommendations. Record the results in a logbook, hold them in the meter's memory or download to an app or computer so you can review and analyze them later. For meter-specific instructions on how to test your blood sugar levels, visit the Accu-Chek Support page for your meter. 1Joslin Diabetes Center. Tips for more pain-free blood glucose monitoring. Available at: . Accessed March 11, 2016. 2Talk with your healthcare professional before deciding if alternate site testing is right for you. Continue reading >>

How Do Blood Glucose Meters Work?

How Do Blood Glucose Meters Work?

How does my blood glucose meter measure how much sugar is in my blood? Blood glucose test strips contain a capillary that sucks the blood up into the test strip. The glucose in the blood reacts with chemicals on the strip. The meter runs an electrical current through the test strip. The total charge passing through is proportional to the amount of glucose in the blood. Why batteries and control solution are important When you understand the process you can see why batteries and control solution are important. Batteries generate the current. Control solution assists you in making sure that the chemicals on the test strips haven’t been damaged by heat, water, cold or anything else. Important things to remember Most blood glucose meters were originally designed to be used with blood taken from a finger prick. Some, including all of the meters we carry, have been approved for alternate site testing. Read your personal meter’s directions to make sure you are following them, especially with regard to where you’re getting the blood you’re using to perform a test. What exactly are you measuring? It’s important to remember that when you test your blood sugar using any glucometer the result shows you an estimate of the amount of glucose in your blood. How accurate are they? The accuracy standard for all meters says that glucose meters must show results that are within 20% of a laboratory standard 95% of the time. If you think about it, that’s actually not very accurate! Don’t be fooled into thinking that you can rely solely on your glucometer to know your blood sugar levels. You should also visit your doctor regularly and he should order laboratory tests to assist you both in managing your blood sugar. What factors affect accuracy? Many, many factors can affect the Continue reading >>

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