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Gestational Diabetes Uk

Gestational Diabetes Uk

Gestational Diabetes UK is dedicated to offering support and evidence based research to women diagnosed with gestational diabetes in the UK and Republic of Ireland. If you have been diagnosed, or are going to be tested for gestational diabetes and want a support network and community for help, advice and to discuss all things related to gestational diabetes, then please join our Facebook support group, Gestational Diabetes UK. What is gestational diabetes? Diabetes is caused by too much glucose (sugar) in the blood. The amount of glucose in the blood is controlled by a hormone called 'insulin'. During pregnancy, the body produces a number of hormones, such as oestrogen, progesterone and human placental lactogen (HPL). These hormones make the body insulin resistant, which means the cells respond less well to insulin and the level of glucose in the blood remains high. To cope with the increased amount of glucose in the blood, the body should produce more insulin. However, some women either cannot produce enough insulin in pregnancy to transport the glucose into the cells, or their body cells are more resistant to insulin. This is known as 'gestational diabetes mellitus'. Gestational diabetes can be defined as carbohydrate intolerance. Gestational diabetes is usually diagnosed by having a OGTT/GTT (oral glucose tolerance test) between 24 - 28 weeks, however women showing symptoms or those that have higher risks of developing gestational diabetes may be tested earlier. Gestational diabetes affects around 5% of UK pregnancies Are some women at a higher risk of getting gestational diabetes than others? You have an increased risk of gestational diabetes if: your body mass index (BMI) is 30 or more you have previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you ha Continue reading >>

Three New Treatment Options For Type 2 Diabetes Recommended By Nice

Three New Treatment Options For Type 2 Diabetes Recommended By Nice

The drugs will help to control blood sugar in those patients who cannot take more commonly prescribed medicines meaning their condition remains stable for longer. An estimated 31,000 people may be eligible for the three recommended treatments: canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Forxiga) and empagliflozin (Jardiance). The three drugs can all be used on their own if a person can’t use metformin, sulfonylurea or pioglitazone, and diet and exercise alone isn’t controlling their blood glucose levels. In the UK, almost 3.5 million people who have been diagnosed with diabetes and it’s estimated that about 90% of adults with the condition have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes causes elevated blood sugar levels which damages blood vessels leading to increased risk of heart attack, stroke and limb amputation. Sugar levels rise because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin – the hormone which controls the amount of glucose in blood – or their body doesn’t use insulin effectively. Professor Carole Longson, director of the NICE Centre for Health Technology Evaluation, said: “Type 2 diabetes is long-term condition that has a serious impact on people who live with it, and the treatments given should be tailored for the individual. “For many people whose blood glucose levels aren’t controlled by diet and exercise alone, metformin is the first drug treatment that they’ll be offered. But some people may experience nausea and diarrhoea, and they may not be able to take it if they have kidney damage. For people who can’t take a sulfonylurea or pioglitazone, then the three drugs recommended in this guidance can be considered. This is as an alternative to the separate group of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. “The committee agreed th Continue reading >>

Nhs Risking People's Health By Rationing Test Strips, Diabetes Uk Says

Nhs Risking People's Health By Rationing Test Strips, Diabetes Uk Says

The NHS is putting diabetic patients at risk of serious illness by rationing test strips that monitor blood glucose levels in an attempt to save money, a charity claims. A survey carried out by Diabetes UK found that one in four complained of restrictions placed on the number of test strips they were prescribed by GP practices. People with diabetes need to test their blood glucose regularly to monitor the condition. If not managed properly, diabetes can lead to health complications such as heart disease, strokes, blindness and amputations. More than half of those professing problems had type 1 diabetes. Government guidance says this group should test themselves at least four times a day. Older people and those on low incomes were also affected, the charity found. Many said they felt they needed to buy test stripsonline, where quality cannot always be guaranteed. People with diabetes were given a variety of reasons for the reduced number of strips prescribed, according to the charity. Some respondents to the survey said they had been told they should test less often. Some were told there were “budget constraints”, while others were told it was because they were testing too frequently. “They said I had my allowance for the month,” said one respondent. Another said: “I was told they were expensive and we should test less. Only need to test four times a day. We use a pump, so need to test every two hours.” Some said they were having to ask for repeat prescriptions more often. “I now need to order and collect a prescription monthly, or sooner, depending on any issues that crop up,” wrote one. Often when people complained to the practice, their normal prescription was reinstated. But Diabetes UK said they were concerned that people had to challenge the GP prac Continue reading >>

Diabetes: It Was Reported On The Bbc Today That Diabetes Accounts For 10% Of The (uk) Nhs Budget. Is This Correct?

Diabetes: It Was Reported On The Bbc Today That Diabetes Accounts For 10% Of The (uk) Nhs Budget. Is This Correct?

It is not just the medications that diabetics need that drives up the cost of caring for them. More expensive by far is the management of the complications of diabetes. I'm thinking here of things like diabetic retinopathy, coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease and so on. 10% of NHS budget? Probably. Continue reading >>

Is Looking To Create An Online Help Centre For Patient Healthcare Issues For The Uk, Diabetes Is A Starter. Not Looking For Pharma Editorial. A Goer?

Is Looking To Create An Online Help Centre For Patient Healthcare Issues For The Uk, Diabetes Is A Starter. Not Looking For Pharma Editorial. A Goer?

From your description , I like the idea very much. But I am not sure on UK disease profiles , if we assume that older people would be the ones most needing the information , a twitter and new media based solution 'might' not prove effective. You can partner with local media/other organizations which will help you reach the audience effectively. just curious , How would you measure the effectiveness? based on number of people accessing / number of people benefited/ what extent they were benefited? I see your point about age yet as a start up option we'd look to provide information via those media outlined initially. The way we envisage widening the audience profile is to provide workshops for healthcare professionals explaining the reasoning. From there the process is an organic one, the facility should really be driven by the patients and we then present their issues to professionals for response. Our measure of effectiveness will be numbers purely. Our belief is that with them and the information they wish to know we can position ourselves as a 'must have' tool for healthcare professionals in their on-going treatment of any long term disease area. Continue reading >>

I Am A Uk Trainee In Endocrinology And Diabetes. I Want To Gain Some Working Experience In The Usa. Is It Possible To Do Any Fellowships?

I Am A Uk Trainee In Endocrinology And Diabetes. I Want To Gain Some Working Experience In The Usa. Is It Possible To Do Any Fellowships?

That might be possible but you will have to consider other issues such as the need for a VISA . A student visa might work so you should research more about this. As for possible places for internship, use sites like LinkedIn and websites dedicated to internship search to look for possible options. Some companies are even willing to assist with VISA processing. In the PayScale dot com Career News blog, there are numerous articles written about the importance of LinkedIn in job hunting and even internships these days so you might want to read the blog. Continue reading >>

Nhs Diet Advice For Diabetes

Nhs Diet Advice For Diabetes

Tweet In the UK, current 2016 NHS diabetes diet advice is that there is no special diet for people with diabetes. Many people with diabetes focus on the carbohydrate content of their meals and prefer a low-carb diet for tight blood glucose level control. The NHS (and Diabetes UK) recommend a healthy, balanced diet that is low in fat, sugar and salt and contain a high level of fresh fruit and vegetables. This guide reviews the diet advice the NHS gives to people with diabetes and discusses to what degree the advice is sensible. What does the NHS advise? The NHS provides the following diet advice for people with diabetes: [147] [148] Eat plenty of starchy carbohydrates with a low glycemic index (low GI) Increase the amount of fibre in your diet Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables - at least 5 portions per day Cut down on fat and saturated fat in particular Choose foods with unsaturated fat instead - such as vegetable oils, reduced fat spreads, oily fish and avocados Choose low-fat dairy products Choose lean meat - such as skinless chicken Avoid fatty or processed meat Eat fish at least twice a week and ensure you have oily fish at least once a week Eggs and beans are other good sources of protein Cook food by grilling, baking, poaching or steaming instead of frying or roasting Avoid fatty or sugary snacks - such as crisps, cakes, biscuits and pastries Eat snacks such as fruit, unsalted nuts and low-fat yoghurts Cut down on sugar Eat less salt - have less than 6g of salt (2.4g of sodium) per day Cut down on alcohol Don’t skip breakfast Keep hydrated - aim to drink between 1.6 and 2 litres of fluid each day Is the NHS advice sensible? Whilst a number of these points are undoubtedly sensible, some of the recommendations have been criticised by patients and some leading UK h Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk Care Line

Diabetes Uk Care Line

A support helpline for anyone with diabetes, their friends, family and carers. Diabetes UK Careline is the only dedicated diabetes helpline in the UK. The confidential helpline is staffed by trained counsellors who can provide information on living with diabetes as well as the time to talk things through. We can help with queries about a range of topics. Here are just a few examples of the questions we are often asked: I've just been diagnosed. What should I do now? I'm finding it difficult to accept the diagnosis – how do I cope? What can I and can't I eat? Can I still drink alcohol? What are the different types of tablets and insulin? What are the possible side effects? When and how often should I test? What should my blood glucose levels be? What if they go too high or too low? What's the law about driving? I'm about to go on holiday abroad. How do I keep my insulin cool in a hot country? What else do I need to consider when travelling? My child has diabetes and finds it hard to give up his treats. Why don't you recommend diabetic chocolate and sweets? Not everyone has a specific query, some just call simply to talk through their concerns or how they’re feeling. Please be aware that we don't have access to your medical records, so you may need to go back to your healthcare team for answers to some questions. Who to contact Continue reading >>

Our Interview With Diabetes Uk Chief Executive Chris Askew

Our Interview With Diabetes Uk Chief Executive Chris Askew

By Alexander Wolf and Varun Iyengar Every year, our team journeys “across the pond” to the United Kingdom, where we have the opportunity to attend the Diabetes UK Professional Conference. Diabetes UK – the largest diabetes charity in the UK – hosts the annual conference, bringing together healthcare providers and patients to discuss the latest updates in diabetes. We are big fans of Diabetes UK’s work to “Care. Connect. Campaign.” across both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This year, we had the chance to speak with its new CE, Mr. Christopher Askew, to learn more about the work Diabetes UK is most excited about moving forward. See below for our full interview to learn more about the organization’s major initiatives, hopes for the future, and its plans to raise the national conversation on diabetes. Interview with Diabetes UK CE Chris Askew diaTribe: Thank you so much for taking the time to speak today. What are Diabetes UK’s main areas of focus? Chris Askew: First, research is a very large part of what we do. We fund around seven million pounds [~$10 million] worth of research each year. And our approach to that has been something called response mode funding. We’ll put a general call for grants out, look at the applications that come back, and fund the best of those. And that tells me that we are funding the best people with the best ideas in diabetes research in this country. I think as we look forward, we’re going to continue that. But we’ve also recently set up things called Clinical Studies Groups and Priority Setting Partnerships, which help us to increasingly host the discussion ourselves and ask if there any things in particular we think we should be researching … I think these Clinical Studies Groups may help us to understand the big them Continue reading >>

About Type 2 Diabetes

About Type 2 Diabetes

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form. About 3.3 million people in the UK have been diagnosed with diabetes, and of these, more than 9 out of 10 have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is more common among older people, but you can develop it at any age. It’s becoming more common in young adults and children. It’s usually associated with being overweight and not very active. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body stops reacting to insulin properly, and you may also not produce enough of insulin. Insulin is a hormone (a chemical made by your body) that controls the amount of glucose in your blood. It helps glucose move from your blood into your body tissues – like your muscle cells – when you need a quick form of energy. If your body is not responding to insulin properly, your blood glucose level can become too high. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, you may not have any obvious symptoms. Your diabetes may be discovered during a routine medical check-up with your GP. If you do have symptoms of type 2 diabetes, you may: pass urine more often than usual be constantly thirsty lose weight for no obvious reason be extremely tired have blurred vision have itchy skin around your genitals or get regular genito-urinary infections, such as thrush If you have any of these symptoms, see your GP. Diagnosis of type 2 diabetes Your GP will ask about your symptoms and examine you. They may ask you to have a blood test for glucose. Other tests can include the following. A fasting blood glucose test. You will need to have this test at a time when you haven’t eaten anything for at least eight hours. Glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C) test. Your HbA1C level is a measure of how much glucose has been taken Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Driving

Diabetes And Driving

You can be fined up to £1,000 if you don’t tell DVLA about a medical condition that affects your driving. You may be prosecuted if you’re involved in an accident as a result. Check with your nurse or doctor if you don’t know what type of medication you’re on. Read leaflet INF188/2 for more information about driving a car or motorbike with diabetes. Diabetes treated by insulin Car or motorbike licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated with insulin. You can also fill in form DIAB1 and send it to DVLA. The address is on the form. Bus, coach or lorry licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated with insulin. Fill in form VDIAB1I and send it to DVLA. The address is on the form. Read leaflet INS186 if you want to apply for vocational entitlement to drive larger vehicles (C1, C1E, D1, DIE, C, CE, D or DE). Diabetes treated by tablets or non-insulin injections Car or motorbike licence Check with your doctor or nurse to find out if your treatment means you need to tell DVLA. If you do need to tell DVLA, fill in form DIAB1 and send it to the address on the form. Bus, coach or lorry licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated by tablets or non-insulin injections. You must fill in: form VDIAB1SG if your diabetes is treated by sulphonylurea or glinide tablets form VDIAB1GEN if your diabetes is treated by any other tablets or non-insulin injections Send the form to DVLA. The address is on the form. Diabetes treated by diet Car or motorbike licence You don’t need to tell DVLA. Bus, coach or lorry licence You don’t need to tell DVLA. Continue reading >>

Diabetics' Access To Blood Glucose Test Strips 'restricted'

Diabetics' Access To Blood Glucose Test Strips 'restricted'

Access to blood glucose test strips vital to help diabetics manage their condition is being restricted against government guidance, a charity says. Of about 2,200 people who answered a question about the strips as part of a survey for Diabetes UK, 39% had had prescriptions refused or restricted. It says restrictions are being imposed by local health managers to save money. But a spokesman representing Clinical Commissioning Groups said the strips had been over-prescribed in the past. It comes after Health Minister Anna Soubry told MPs the restriction of access to the testing strips was "unacceptable". Following this, the Department of Health wrote to all GPs in England telling them that prescriptions for the testing strips should be on the basis of clinical need and not restricted. However, Diabetes UK says its survey found a quarter of those whose prescriptions had been restricted had been told by their GP that this was because of restrictions put in place by their local Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). It says there is widespread variation in different parts of the country of guidance on prescribing test strips, with some patients allowed only two testing strips per week. Long-term complications This is despite the fact people with type-1 diabetes need to test their blood every time they eat, plus more often if they exercise and every time they drive, the charity says. A box of 50 test strips retails at about £25, but the cost to the NHS is lower, depending on the deal agreed by each area's CCG - who manage healthcare services and commission care locally - with the manufacturers. Diabetes UK is calling on health leaders to remove restrictions, so prescriptions can be made according to patients' clinical needs. It says rationing them could be putting people's lives Continue reading >>

Does The Uk Healthcare System Provide Any Supply For Diabetes Patients?

Does The Uk Healthcare System Provide Any Supply For Diabetes Patients?

I don’t know if you would be entitled to NHS care or not on your visa you would need to look in to that. If you are entitled to NHS care you would get all your insulin, test strips, needles on prescription. Your prescriptions would be free of charge because those with certain chronic conditions such as Diabetes are exempt from paying the prescription charge - you get a special card - and incidentally that exemption applies to all of your prescriptions not just those related to your diabetes. Ask New Question Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk

Diabetes Uk

For the online medical resource, see Patient UK. Diabetes UK is a British-based patient, healthcare professional and research charity that describes itself as the "leading UK charity that cares for, connects with and campaigns on behalf of all people affected by and at risk of diabetes."[1] The charity campaigns for improvements in the care and treatment of people with diabetes. History[edit] Diabetes UK was founded in 1934 as The Diabetic Association, by the author H. G. Wells and Dr R. D. Lawrence.[2] Diabetes UK's first research grant was made in 1936.[3] The organisation has since had two name changes—in 1954 to The British Diabetic Association and again in June 2000 to Diabetes UK.[2] Diabetes UK's first voluntary group was set up in 1939; 350 groups are now spread out across the UK. There are also local offices across England and national offices in Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. They run conferences for their volunteers and healthcare professionals in the field of diabetes. The charity has been running care holidays since the 1930s for children. Family and adult holidays have been introduced since. The holidays aim to provide support and advice in a fun surrounding.[4] In 1993, a counselling line for patients, family and friends was launched with recorded diabetes information available 24 hours a day.[5] Research[edit] Diabetes UK provides extensive funding for United Kingdom-based research into the causes and treatment of diabetes and its complications. The charity's first research grant was made in 1936.[3] The charity provides financial support for "project grants, funding to purchase laboratory equipment, and research-training opportunities ranging from PhD studentships to research fellowships."[6] In 2011, the charity awarded £1,035,743 to five ne Continue reading >>

Welcome To The Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating (dafne) Website

Welcome To The Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating (dafne) Website

DAFNE is a way of managing Type 1 diabetes and provides people with the skills necessary to estimate the carbohydrate in each meal and to inject the right dose of insulin. This site contains up-to-date information on DAFNE for both people living with Type 1 diabetes, healthcare professionals and commissioners. If you are commissioning diabetes services this brief commissioning guide may be useful click here REPOSE RESULTS PUBLISHED The REPOSE results were published on 30 March 2017 in The BMJ. The article can be accessed here: DAFNE Mission Statement Our vision is to improve outcomes for people with Type 1 diabetes through high quality structured education which is embedded in the Health Service. We will use the DAFNE programme, including the DAFNE educator programme (DEP), DAFNE doctor programme (DDP), peer review, internal quality assurance (IQA) and audit as a framework in which to develop this patient centered model of care. We will continue to improve and develop DAFNE through research and development (R&D) and collaboration with other groups, to understand the determinants of success. Ross, Sarah and Bob share their DAFNE experience (with subtitles) Animation by Brickabetes Taking control with DAFNE Diabetes UK has produced a film following Bob, Sarah and Ross on their DAFNE course delivered at King’s College Hospital, London. The aim of DAFNE is to help you to work towards your personal diabetes-related goals so you may lead as normal a life as possible, while controlling your blood glucose, hence reducing the risk of long-term complications related to diabetes. For further information with regards to diabetes education visit www.diabetes.org.uk/diabetes-education The updated NICE Quality standard for adults with diabetes was published on 18 August 2016. The st Continue reading >>

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