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What Do Diabetes Pills Do

Diabetes Pills

Diabetes Pills

There are several different kinds of diabetes medicines in addition to insulin. These medicines can lower blood sugar levels but they're not the same as insulin. Most of these medicines are available in pill form. Insulin can't be taken as a pill because acids in the stomach destroy it before it can enter the bloodstream. In type 2 diabetes, the body still makes some of its own insulin, but isn't able to make enough to keep up with the body's needs or use its own insulin effectively. Diabetes pills don't replace the body's insulin, but they can help the body make more insulin or help it more effectively use the insulin it does make. Most people who have type 2 diabetes take diabetes pills to help them keep their blood sugar levels closer to normal. People with type 1 diabetes don't use diabetes pills. They need to take insulin shots because their bodies can't make any of their own insulin. Here are some different types of diabetes medicines, grouped by how they help the body keep blood sugar levels closer to normal. Medicine That Helps the Body Make More Insulin Sulfonylureas and meglitinides like repaglinide (Prandin) and nateglinide (Starlix) are secretagagogues and all do similar things. These pills cause a person's pancreas to make more of its own insulin. Sulfonylureas have been used since the 1950s to help people lower their blood sugar levels. Over the years, newer and better versions of this drug have become available. One of the best drugs currently available in this class is glimepiride (Amaryl). Here's how these pills work: Sulfonylureas help the pancreas make more insulin. When the insulin gets into the bloodstream, blood sugar levels go down. Like people who take insulin, people who take sulfonylureas need to be careful that their blood sugar levels don't d Continue reading >>

What Is The Market Size Of Chronic Care (diabetes/hypertension/stroke Patients) Pills In India?

What Is The Market Size Of Chronic Care (diabetes/hypertension/stroke Patients) Pills In India?

Don't know exactly. But it will be definitely more as these are the most common problems from age 40, some even before. India is the capital of diabetes and hypertension with millions affected. Any patient given after 40 age, will have one of the disease in background. And they are chronic. Each patient will spend a lot of money for life long many be 10 to 20 years. For exact share a pharmacologist or a medical representative can know it better than a doctor. Continue reading >>

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Taking insulin or other diabetes medicines is often part of treating diabetes. Along with healthy food choices and physical activity, medicine can help you manage the disease. Some other treatment options are also available. What medicines might I take for diabetes? The medicine you take will vary by your type of diabetes and how well the medicine controls your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar. Other factors, such as your other health conditions, medication costs, and your daily schedule may play a role in what diabetes medicine you take. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin because your body no longer makes this hormone. You will need to take insulin several times during the day, including with meals. You also could use an insulin pump, which gives you small, steady doses throughout the day. Type 2 diabetes Some people with type 2 diabetes can manage their disease by making healthy food choices and being more physically active. Many people with type 2 diabetes need diabetes medicines as well. These medicines may include diabetes pills or medicines you inject under your skin, such as insulin. In time, you may need more than one diabetes medicine to control your blood glucose. Even if you do not take insulin, you may need it at special times, such as during pregnancy or if you are in the hospital. Gestational diabetes If you have gestational diabetes, you should first try to control your blood glucose level by making healthy food choices and getting regular physical activity. If you can’t reach your blood glucose target, your health care team will talk with you about diabetes medicines, such as insulin or the diabetes pill metformin, that may be safe for you to take during pregnancy. Your health care team may start you on diab Continue reading >>

Can We Mix Diabetes Pill With Coffee And Take It?

Can We Mix Diabetes Pill With Coffee And Take It?

I would STRONGLY advise against this, for a few reasons: Your dad needs to know if he is on any medication because of the risk that it could interact with something else he is taking. You do not know what the safe dose is for your dad. It could have unintended side effects and he needs to be aware to watch for those. For example, some antidiabetic medications carry a high risk of low blood sugar. If your dad's blood sugar fell dangerously low when he was driving it could cause an accident. If your dad needs medical care they need to know what medication he is on, especially medication to treat diabetes. (Metformin, one of the most common first-line diabetes medications, should be stopped 48 hours prior to any diagnostic imaging that requires contrast dye. There isn't a direct interaction, but the dye can cause acute kidney failure. This significantly increases the risk for a severe side effect of metformin, called lactic acidosis.) I understand that you care about your dad and you want what's best for him. Unfortunately, what you're suggesting is potentially very dangerous. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Tweet Diabetes medications are a common form of treatment for people with diabetes. There are many different types of diabetes medicines, or anti-diabetic drugs, and this includes insulin, which has its own area within the site. Whilst each drug is unique in the way it works to help patients with diabetes keep their condition under control, some act similarly to one other and are grouped in the same class of drugs. The way in which they are administered can also differ, with some medicines taken orally and others injected directly into the blood. Are diabetes drugs suitable for all diabetics? Most diabetes drugs are designed for people with type 2 diabetes who are unable to control their blood sugar levels through strict diet and exercise alone. But some, such as metformin, are sometimes taken alongside insulin treatment for people with type 1 diabetes. Medication guides Explore the 18 most common medications for diabetes: Assists insulin in controlling post-meal glucose levels. Can more than one drug be taken at the same time? Depending on individual circumstances, a GP may prescribe more than one anti-diabetic drug to help treat a patient’s diabetes. Watch the video below for more information on the types of diabetes medication available. What are the side effects of anti-diabetic medicines? As with any type of medication, blood glucose-lowering drugs can have a number of side effects. These potentially harmful effects are listed in the patient information leaflet that accompanies the medication, so make sure you check this before starting your drug treatment. You may not experience any of the adverse effects listed, but if you do, consult your doctor and/or diabetes care team as they may be able to suggest another suitable medication for your condition. They will a Continue reading >>

9 Types Of Medication That Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

9 Types Of Medication That Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Sometimes people with type 2 diabetes are able to bring their blood glucose levels under control through a combination of weight loss, diet, and exercise, but many people with diabetes take medication to manage their condition. For some, a single diabetes medication is effective, while in other cases a combination of drugs works better. “If diabetes control is suboptimal on the maximum dose of one medication, it’s prudent to add on a second agent,” says Deepashree Gupta, MD, assistant professor of endocrinology at Saint Louis University in Missouri. There are many drugs available to treat type 2 diabetes. Your diabetes care team can help you understand the differences among the types of medication on this long list, and will explain how you take them, what they do, and what side effects they may cause. Your doctor will discuss your specific situation and your options for adding one or more types of medication to your treatment. Types of Medication for Type 2 Diabetes In type 2 diabetes, even though insulin resistance is what leads to the condition, injections of insulin are not the first resort. Instead, other drugs are used to help boost insulin production and the body’s regulation of it. Insulin resistance occurs when the body’s cells don’t respond properly to insulin, which is a hormone made in the pancreas that’s responsible for ferrying glucose to cells for energy. When cells are resistant to insulin, they don’t use the insulin effectively to bring the glucose from the bloodstream into the cell. The pancreas needs to produce more insulin to overcome this resistance in an effort to normalize blood sugar levels. When the pancreas can’t keep up with the insulin demands in a person with insulin resistance, that person develops diabetes. Below is an ov Continue reading >>

Does Your Medicine Make You Gain Weight?

Does Your Medicine Make You Gain Weight?

Diabetes medications are effective at lowering blood glucose, but they also can cause you to gain weight. "Weight gain is a frequent yet unrevealed side effect of insulin and a few other categories of blood glucose lowering medicines," says Marty Irons, R.Ph., CDE, a clinical community pharmacist in Vermont and member of the Diabetic Living editorial advisory board. Irons says weight gain doesn't have to be permanent, and your health-care provider should help you balance blood glucose control with your weight. Avoid extra pounds caused by medication with these easy-to-follow tips: How to Prevent Medication-Related Weight Gain If you're prescribed a diabetes medication that may cause weight gain, here's how to avoid this unwanted side effect: Speak up and ask questions. Ask your health-care provider why you need a particular medication that may cause you to gain weight instead of one that may promote weight loss. "Primary-care providers can be slow to adopt newer medications and often rely on tried-and-true fixes," says Marty Irons, R.Ph., CDE. Ask for help and a plan. "Work with an educator to develop a plan to nip weight gain in the bud and get the support you need along the way," says Jennifer Okemah, R.D., BC-ADM. Reduce calorie intake. Avoid weight gain by making small changes. Use measuring tools to get the right portion sizes, and lighten up on salad dressing, mayonnaise, and margarine to save calories. Adjust calorie intake as needed. Burn more calories. Increase physical activity to help burn more calories. Create a calorie deficit of at least 500 calories per day, suggests Anne Daly, R.D., BC-ADM, CDE. Get moving at least 30 minutes on most days. Don't overtreat lows. Eating too much to treat hypoglycemia can raise blood glucose too high and add excess calories Continue reading >>

Conversations

Conversations

It has been predicted that by 2050, one in three Americans will have type 2 diabetes. But the diagnosis doesn’t have to mean a life inundated with pills, which this diabetic learned after finding a way to stay off medication. Phyllisa Deroza joined HuffPost Live’s Ricky Camilleri to talk about being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes after her rising glucose levels sent her into a coma. However, for the past two-and-a-half years, Deroza has been completely off medication, which she attributes to three simple things. The first two elements of Deroza’s med-free life are a healthy diet and a rigorous exercise routine. The third involves going above and beyond the typical amount of glucose testing. “I do test my glucose about five times a day, which a lot of type 2 diabetics don’t do,” Deroza said. “Many people tell them that they can test once a day or twice a day, but I find if I’m testing frequently, I keep my numbers within a tight range, so that’s helpful for me.” Watch the full HuffPost Live conversation about diabetes below: Continue reading >>

Who Can Take Diabetes Pills?

Who Can Take Diabetes Pills?

Diabetes pills aren't for everyone with diabetes. They are effective only if your pancreas is still capable of producing insulin. This means that some people—those with type 1 diabetes and those with type 2 diabetes whose bodies have lost the ability to produce insulin—cannot use them. The good news is that there are a number of new diabetes pills that have different sites of actions. Remember that type 2 diabetes is caused by insulin resistance that can be present throughout the body, particularly in the liver, and the inability of the pancreas to make enough insulin to overcome that resistance. Therefore, diabetes pills that work on each of these different problems can be combined. And for some individuals with type 2 diabetes, diabetes pills are even combined with insulin. This is done if the pancreas' ability to make insulin is reduced so much that additional supplements of insulin are needed. Overall the goal is to either help your body use its own insulin more effectively or give it extra if needed. Find more information about diabetes in What You Need to Know about Diabetes – A Short Guide available from the Joslin Online Store. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medicines You Don’t Inject

Diabetes Medicines You Don’t Inject

When you think about diabetes drugs, you may think of insulin or other medications that you get from a shot or a pump. But there are others that you take as a pill or that you inhale. Your doctor will consider exactly what you need, which may include more than one type of diabetes medicine. The goal is to get your best blood sugar control, and the oral drugs do that in several ways. How it works: Blocks enzymes that help digest starches, slowing the rise in blood sugar. It belongs to a group of drugs called “alpha-glucosidase inhibitors.” Side effects for these kinds of drugs include stomach upset (gas, diarrhea, nausea, cramps). Alogliptin (Nesina) How it works: Boosts insulin levels when blood sugars are too high, and tells the liver to cut back on making sugars. Your doctor may call this type of drug a “DPP-IV inhibitor.” These drugs do not cause weight gain. You may take them alone or with another drug, like metformin. Bromocriptine mesylate (Cycloset, Parlodel) How it works: This tablet raises the level of dopamine, a brain chemical. It’s approved help improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes, along with diet and exercise. It’s not used to treat type 1 diabetes. Canagliflozin (Invokana) How it works: Boosts how much glucose leaves your body in urine, and blocks your kidney from reabsorbing glucose. Your doctor may call this type of drug a “SGLT2 inhibitor.” Side effects can include: Urinary tract infections Dizziness, fainting Ketoacidosis or ketosis Increased risk of bone fracture Decreased bone mineral density Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) How it works: Lowers blood sugar by prompting the pancreas to release more insulin. Your doctor may call this type of drug “sulfonylureas.” This drug is not used as often as newer sulfonylurea Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications Fact Sheet

Oral Diabetes Medications Fact Sheet

Summa Health System developed this fact sheet for patients who need to take oral medicine to manage their diabetes. Care providers give it to patients during diabetes planned visits, and it is part of the Diabetes Planned Visit Notebook. Oral Diabetes Medications Family Medicine Center of Akron Copyright © 2006 American Diabetes Association Adapted from the ADA Patient Information The first treatment for type 2 diabetes is often meal planning for blood glucose (sugar) control, weight loss, and exercising. Sometimes these measures are not enough to bring blood glucose levels down near the normal range. The next step is taking a medicine that lowers blood glucose levels. How they work In people with diabetes, blood glucose levels are too high. These high levels occur because glucose remains in the blood rather than entering cells, where it belongs. But for glucose to pass into a cell, insulin must be present and the cell must be "hungry" for glucose. People with type 1 diabetes don't make insulin. For them, insulin shots are the only way to keep blood glucose levels down. People with type 2 diabetes tend to have two problems: they don't make quite enough insulin and the cells of their bodies don't seem to take in glucose as eagerly as they should. All diabetes pills sold today in the United States are members of five classes of drugs: sulfonylureas, meglitinides, biguanides, thiazolidinediones, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. These five classes of drugs work in different ways to lower blood glucose levels. Can diabetes pills help me? Only people with type 2 diabetes can use pills to manage their diabetes. These pills work best when used with meal planning and exercise. This way you have three therapies working together to lower your blood glucose levels. Diabetes pills Continue reading >>

Medication For Type 2 Diabetes

Medication For Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are often given medications including insulin to help control their blood glucose levels. Most of these medications are in the form of tablets, but some are given by injection. Tablets or injections are intended to be used in conjunction with healthy eating and regular physical activity, not as a substitute. Diabetes tablets are not an oral form of insulin.Speak with your doctor or pharmacist if you experience any problems. An alternative medication is usually available. All people with diabetes need to check their glucose levels on a regular basis. When taking medication, you may need to check your glucose levels more often to keep you safe and to ensure the medication is having the desired effect. In Australia there are seven classes of medicines used to treat type 2 diabetes: Biguanides Sulphonylureas Thiazolidinediones (Glitazones) Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitors. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors Incretin mimetics Sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT2) inhibitors Your doctor will talk to you about which tablets are right for you, when to take your tablets and how much to take. Your doctor can also tell you about any possible side effects. You should speak to your doctor or pharmacist if you experience any problems. Chemical name: METFORMIN , METFORMIN ER Points to remember about biguanides This group of insulin tablets helps to lower blood glucose levels by reducing the amount of stored glucose released by the liver, slowing the absorption of glucose from the intestine, and helping the body to become more sensitive to insulin so that your own insulin works better They need to be started at a low dose and increased slowly Metformin is often prescribed as the first diabetes tablet for people with type 2 diabetes who are overweight. It gene Continue reading >>

Could A Fat Pill Prevent Diabetes?

Could A Fat Pill Prevent Diabetes?

If the pill is so fat it physically prevents you from eating processed sugar, then it would! When fast food restaurants are so dominant in parts of the world, and sugar-fat-flavor-hydrogenated fat pumped candies, chocolates, cookies and so on are pushed so hard in supermarkets - then it's no wonder that diabetes and similar life style diseases are on the rise! Remove the CAUSE instead of making medicine for the symptoms ... If the pill seriously reduced sugar entering the blood, perhaps. Obesity and diabetes are linked in more than one way, but the primary one, I think, is plain old sugar and insulin. Refined sugar is not a food humans are prepared for -- it makes it into the blood far too quickly, forcing an emergency dollop of insulin to be released from the pancreas (to protect the body from the effects of high blood sugar, a slow poison.) Huge spikes of blood glucose and of insulin both tend to damage the body over time, and are both implicated in the cycle that leads to type-II diabetes. The sugar is forced, by the insulin, to enter cells that don't actually need it yet. The cells are forced to turn it into triglycerides (fat) for storage, leading to fast weight gain which has been shown to increase insulin resistance. Meanwhile, the pancreas is stressed having to pump out insulin so quickly, and the high-glucose blood reaching the pancreas in the meantime will oxidize beta cells and gradually reduce the pancreas' ability to respond, leading to lowered insulin production. Either or both of these could lead over time to type-II diabetes. So it seems to me that a theoretical pill that prevents spikes of blood sugar would save a lot of people becoming diabetic. (Either reducing sugar entering the blood, or spreading that entry over several hours, might be effective.) Continue reading >>

In How Much Time Diabetes Type 1 Will Be Under Control With Insulin Pills?

In How Much Time Diabetes Type 1 Will Be Under Control With Insulin Pills?

In type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes), thе cells in thе pancreas thаt produce insulin аrе progressively destroyed bу аn immune reaction, stopping thе production оf insulin. Insulin replacement treatment iѕ thеrеfоrе needed fоr life, bесаuѕе wе саnnоt make thе beta cells in thе pancreas work аgаin tо produce insulin. Insulin саn't bе tаkеn in tablet form, bесаuѕе it iѕ broken dоwn in thе digestive system. Thiѕ destroys itѕ effect. Insulin iѕ givеn bу injection. Diabetes is about controlling sugar that enter your body, my mom used to be have diabetes symptoms, but after she lead a healthy lifestyle, she looks very happy and healthy without worrying about diabetes. I have found effective ways to cure Diabetes at Control Your Blood Sugar Level for designing her nutrition intake and diet program. IT WORKS! Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications

Diabetes Medications

While making lifestyle changes can go a long way in managing diabetes, as well as related conditions such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, your doctor may prescribe medications depending on your health needs. Your diabetes treatment plan may include insulin, oral diabetes medication or a combination approach, as determined by your doctor. In some cases, patients may require multiple-drug therapy if they have additional cardiovascular risk factors with diabetes. Adherence to your medication plan is very important. Insulin The pancreas normally secretes a hormone called insulin, which helps the body's cells take in glucose from the blood to use it for energy. When functioning as it should, the pancreas produces the ideal amount of insulin. In people with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn't produce insulin. People with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but their bodies do not use it properly. Over time people with type 2 diabetes may produce less insulin as well. Insulin may be prescribed for both types of diabetes to help regulate blood glucose so the body can work properly. There are many types of insulin on the market, all of which must be injected into the fat under the skin in order for it to reach the bloodstream. (Insulin is not currently available in pill form because it would be broken down during the digestive process.) Injections can be done using a: Syringe: A needle connected to a hollow tube that holds the insulin and a plunger that pushes the insulin down into and through the needle Insulin pen: A device that looks like a pen and holds insulin but has a needle for its tip Insulin pump: A small machine (worn on a belt or kept in a pocket) that holds insulin, pumps it through a small plastic tube and through a tiny needle inserted under the skin w Continue reading >>

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