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What Do Diabetes Feet Look Like

Caring For Your Feet, Skin And Teeth When You Have Diabetes

Caring For Your Feet, Skin And Teeth When You Have Diabetes

Good personal care can prevent problems caused by diabetes. Daily attention and regular exams are very important. Caring for your feet You need to take extra care of your feet and legs. High blood glucose can cause damage to the nerves and blood vessels in your feet and lower legs. When nerves are damaged, you don't feel problems like sores or cuts on your feet. Amputations caused by diabetes could be reduced by as much as 75 percent with good self-care and regular foot exams by your health care provider. Remember to take your shoes and socks off at each diabetes visit with your health care provider or nurse. This will remind you that you need to have your feet looked at regularly. Diabetes foot care guidelines Look at your feet every day to check for sores, cuts, cracks or blisters. Use a hand mirror, or ask a family member, to check the bottoms of your feet. Wash your feet with slightly warm water every day. Do not soak your feet because this will dry them out and might cause problems like cracking. Always check inside shoes for worn areas or objects that could cause a sore on your foot. New shoes should be broken in slowly. Ask your health care provider if you need special shoes. Use lotion or cream for dry skin, but do not use it between your toes. Cut toenails straight across and smooth out sharp edges. Ask your health care provider or nurse to examine your feet at every checkup. Wear proper shoes and socks even when indoors. Protect your feet from hot or cold conditions. Don't use heating pads or hot water bottles on your feet. Do not smoke. Smoking decreases the blood flow to your feet. Poor blood flow means slower healing and greater chance of infection. Caring for your skin and teeth People with diabetes need to be extra careful in taking care of their skin and Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Pain

Diabetic Foot Pain

by Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Includes photo of Dr. Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Diabetes is one of the most common reasons people seek relief for painful feet. With diabetes, four types of foot problems may arise in the feet. Nerve Problems due to Diabetes The most common contributor to diabetic foot pain is a nerve problem called Peripheral Neuropathy. This is where the nerves are directly affected by the disease process. There are basically three types of peripheral neuropathy: sensory, motor, and autonomic neuropathy. A large percentage of pain diabetic patients complain of is due to sensory neuropathy. This can show up as "sensitive pain," where the amount of pain is not proportional to the amount of insult that is causing it. For instance, just touching the skin or putting a sheet over your feet in bed could be painful. This can be present at the same time as numbness in the feet. Sensory neuropathy symptoms can include burning, tingling or a stabbing pain. Relief is foremost on someone's mind when painful neuropathy has raised its ugly head. The first thing to do is to check your blood sugar for the past several weeks to see if there has been a trend toward high blood sugar (Editor's Note: The A1c test is traditionally employed to determine this, and should be repeated about every three months.) Persistent high blood sugar can contribute to this type of pain. Massaging your feet with a diabetic foot cream, or using a foot roller, often takes the edge off the pain. Vitamin B preparations are often recommended; and there are a variety of prescription medications that do work. Using cushioned, supportive shoes and foot support inserts is always needed to protect the feet from the pounding, rubbing and irritating pressures that contribute to neuropathic pain. Motor neuropathy can Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy—the Agony Of Da Feet

Diabetic Neuropathy—the Agony Of Da Feet

[Editor’s note: In recognition of American Diabetes Month, Harvard Health Publications is collaborating with MSN.com on its Stop Diabetes initiative. Today’s post, published on World Diabetes Day, is the first of several focusing on this all-too-common disorder.] People tend to think of diabetes as a silent, painless condition. Don’t tell that to the millions of folks with diabetes-induced tingling toes or painful feet. This problem, called diabetic neuropathy, can range from merely aggravating to disabling or even life threatening. It’s something I have first-hand (or, more appropriately, first-foot) knowledge about. High blood sugar, the hallmark of diabetes, injures nerves and blood vessels throughout the body. The first nerves to be affected tend to be the smallest ones furthest from the spinal cord—those that stretch to the toes and feet. Diabetic neuropathy affects different people in different ways. I feel it as a tingling in my toes. Moving my feet and wiggling my toes helps the tingling disappear for a while. Others have it much worse. Diabetic neuropathy can cause a constant burning feeling in the feet; sharp pain that may be worse at night; and extreme sensitivity to touch, making the weight of a sheet unbearable. It can be sneaky, too, and completely rob the feet of their ability to sense pain. The truly scary thing about diabetic neuropathy is a 10-letter word we usually associate with horrific accidents or Civil War battlefields—amputation. When sensory nerves in the feet become damaged, a blister, cut, or sore can go unnoticed, allowing time for the wound to become infected. Infections that cause tissue to die (gangrene) and that spread to the bone may be impossible to treat with cleansing and antibiotics. Diabetes accounts for about 70,000 lo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Amputation: Everything You Need To Know To Avoid Amputation

Diabetes And Amputation: Everything You Need To Know To Avoid Amputation

In this article, we will cover everything that you need to know about how to avoid an extremity amputation due to diabetes. We will cover skin and foot care, what to look for, and when to contact your doctor. We will discuss whether or not you need to see a podiatrist, and what to do if you do have a diabetic foot ulcer. We will look at how to get it treated, so that it heals and doesn’t progress to amputation. We will also look at what to do if you are going to have, or have already had an amputation due to your diabetes. We will look at ways you can become mobile again safely. We will also discuss ways to protect your remaining limbs so that you don’t have another amputation later. We will discuss what to look for related to residual limb care, and how to locate needed resources, such as a physical therapist. In my own experience as a nurse for 22 years, and as a certified diabetes educator, I have seen many people with diabetes lose functional mobility, and even their life, after an amputation. I have seen a person go from having a blister and not even knowing they have diabetes to having a below the knee amputation in under two weeks. In addition, I have worked with people who have been through femoral popliteal bypass surgery, amputation of the toes, then a below the knee amputation. I have watched them come in and out of the hospital until they have an above the knee amputation. With cardiovascular disease, the risk of another amputation is very high. I have watched their pain and suffering, and seen the struggles that their families go through after amputation due to complications of diabetes. I have sat up late with them, while they try to deal with phantom residual limb pain, as their mind plays tricks on them and they feel pain in the already amputated leg Continue reading >>

Foot Care

Foot Care

When you have diabetes you need to take care of your feet every day Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and amputations Daily care can prevent serious complications Check your feet daily for changes or problems Visit a podiatrist annually for a check up or more frequently if your feet are at high risk Your feet are at risk because diabetes can cause damage to the nerves in your feet, blood circulation and infection. Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and amputations. This damage is more likely if: You have had diabetes for a long time Your blood glucose levels have been too high for an extended period You smoke – smoking causes a reduced blood flow to your feet, wounds heal slowly You are inactive. It's important to check your feet every day. If you see any of the following- get medical treatment that *day * Ulcer Unusual swelling Redness Blisters Ingrown nail Bruising or cuts If you see any of the following- get medical treatment within 7 days Broken skin between toes Callus Corn Foot shape changes Cracked skin Nail colour changes Poor blood glucose control can cause nerve damage to feet. Symptoms include: Numbness Coldness of the legs A tingling, pins and needles sensation in the feet Burning pains in the legs and feet, usually more noticeable in bed at night. These symptoms can result in a loss of sensation in the feet which increases the risk of accidental damage because you can’t feel any pain. An injury to the feet can develop into an ulcer on the bottom of a foot which can penetrate to the bone. This could lead to infection of the bone (osteomyelitis) and a chronic infection in the bones and joints. If an infection isn’t treated at the earliest signs, this could result in ulceration (an infected open sore) and eventually Continue reading >>

The Shocking Images That Reveal What Diabetes Can Do To Your Feet In Just 10 Days

The Shocking Images That Reveal What Diabetes Can Do To Your Feet In Just 10 Days

50-year-old man developed lesions on his feet after new shoes rubbed The small lesions quickly escalated into a full-blown infection - within days his right foot was black, weeping pus and in urgent need of surgery Every 30 seconds, a diabetic person in the world has a lower limb amputated This means patients don't feel blisters and are more likely to get infections These gruesome pictures show the horrific damage diabetes can do to the body in just a matter of days. They were taken by a 50-year-old man who had developed lesions on his feet after his new shoes rubbed. The man, who was obese, had no idea he was suffering from diabetes, doctors said. The small lesions quickly escalated into a full-blown infection - within days his right foot was black, weeping pus and in urgent need of surgery. His story, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, highlights the devastating impact diabetes can have on all parts of the body - especially the feet. Every 30 seconds, someone in the world with the condition has a lower limb amputated, according to the charity Diabetes UK. People with diabetes are more likely to be admitted to hospital with a foot ulcer than with any other complication. This is because the condition can lead to poor circulation and reduced feeling in the feet - meaning patients such as this man don't feel when their feet are sore or being rubbed by something, This means they might develop a blister or minor burn without realising it, increasing the likelihood of a wound developing and then becoming infected. Poor circulation also means that wounds don't heal as well - and are more likely to become infected. Reporting on the case, the doctors, from the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, said the patient arrived at hospital 10 days after the infec Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

1 / 11 Are You Suffering From a Diabetes-Related Skin Complication? About a third of people with diabetes will develop skin problems at some point. In fact, some skin issues can be warning signs of diabetes. The good news is that most skin conditions can be treated easily if they’re caught early. Keeping proper control of your blood sugar (glucose) can prevent skin problems and many other diabetes symptoms from happening in the first place. “For the most part, control of diabetes can help with related skin issues,” says Justin Ko, MD, the medical director and service chief of medical dermatology at Stanford Health Care, in Redwood City, California. “I’m always adamant that my diabetic patients take aggressive care of their skin and health in general. For the skin, moisturization, checking feet and legs daily for any blisters, sores, and skin breaks (especially between the toes), and nail care is extremely important. Nail and foot fungus can lead to skin cracks and breaks, allowing bacteria to enter and cause infection.” Continue reading >>

Foot Gangrene: What Is It? What Does It Look Like?

Foot Gangrene: What Is It? What Does It Look Like?

Warning: The pictures you are going to view on this website are graphic and not for the faint of heart. Foot gangrene, as a part of diabetes and/or atherosclerosis management, has become a major medical problem. This website is intended to allow you to manage your own care, ask the right questions, insist on adequate management and information, and seek an optimal outcome for yourself as an informed patient. Perhaps it will even help the health professionals - vascular specialists and foot doctors (chiropodists, podiatrists) - who are giving care to better understand and, hopefully, incorporate into their practice the nutritional approach to gangrene - its prevention and treatment. Please note that this website is not intended for “most people." It is written for those who want to stand out in self-health care. If you are such a person, we strongly advise that you give serious thought to all of the suggestions about how to stop the progression of gangrene, dry foot gangrene in particular. If you are tempted to think the suggestions are too complicated or simplistic, or even biased, we assure you they are not. In most cases, foot gangrene is a result of the compromised blood circulation, an insufficient oxygen-rich and nutrient-dense blood supply usually caused by arterial - femoral, popliteal or tibial - obstruction (the human tissue dies from oxygen deficiency more rapidly than when deprived of any other nutrient). The lumen of the artery becomes progressively narrowed up to the point of complete occlusion (blockage), causing normal blood flow to stop. In other words, gangrene develops if the blood supply deteriorates to a stage where insufficient blood is available to keep the tissues alive. When gangrene develops dire calls for medical help often are too late as st Continue reading >>

How To Look After Your Feet If You Have Diabetes

How To Look After Your Feet If You Have Diabetes

It's especially important to look after your feet if you have diabetes. Here's how to take care of your feet and advice on when to get professional help. Diabetes can reduce the blood supply to your feet and cause a loss of feeling known as peripheral neuropathy. This can mean foot injuries do not heal well, and you may not notice if your foot is sore or injured. "The risk of complications can be greatly reduced if you're able to bring your blood sugar levels under control," says foot specialist Mike O'Neill. "Ensure that your blood pressure and cholesterol levels are also monitored and controlled with medication if needed." Foot care tips if you have diabetes See a private or NHS podiatrist at least once a year. You should be eligible for an NHS podiatrist if you have a long term condition such as diabetes. Ask your GP for a referral or find a local podiatrist. Keep your feet clean and free from infection. Wear shoes that fit well and don't squeeze or rub. Ill-fitting shoes can cause corns and calluses, ulcers and nail problems. Never walk barefoot, especially in the garden or on the beach on holidays to avoid cuts and try to avoid sitting with your legs crossed so you don't constrict your blood circulation. Cut or file your toenails regularly. Get corns or hard skin treated by a podiatrist. Stop smoking to protect your feet If you have diabetes, it's important to try to stop smoking. Smoking impairs the blood circulation, particularly in people with diabetes. It can seriously worsen foot and leg problems. Read more about how the NHS can help you to stop smoking. When to see a doctor Seek treatment from your GP or podiatrist if blisters or injuries do not heal quickly. You should see your doctor urgently if: you notice breaks in the skin of your foot, or discharge seep Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes and foot problems facts Two main conditions, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral neuropathy, are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Symptoms and signs of diabetic foot problems arise due to the decreased sensation from nerve damage as well as the lack of oxygen delivery to the feet caused by vascular disease. Diabetic foot problems also include bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, fungal infections, dryness of the skin, and ingrown toenails. These problems are not specific to diabetes, but may occur more commonly due to the nerve and vascular damage caused by diabetes. Treatment depends on the exact type of foot problem. Surgery or even amputation may be required for some cases. Gangrene (dry gangrene) is tissue death due to absence of blood circulation. It can be life threatening if bacterial infection develops (wet gangrene). Many diabetes-related foot problems can be prevented by good control of blood sugar levels combined with appropriate care of the feet. How can diabetes cause foot problems? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause damage to blood vessels and peripheral nerves that can result in problems in the legs and feet. Two main conditions, 1) peripheral artery disease (PAD), and 2) peripheral neuropathy are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), sometimes referred to as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), means that there is narrowing or occlusion by atherosclerotic plaques of arteries outside of the heart and brain. This is sometimes referred to as "hardening" of the arteries. Diabetes is a known risk factor for developing peripheral artery disease. In addition to pain in the calves during exercise (medically known as intermitte Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Infections

Diabetic Foot Infections

Practice Essentials Compromise of the blood supply from microvascular disease, often in association with lack of sensation because of neuropathy, predisposes persons with diabetes mellitus to foot infections. These infections span the spectrum from simple, superficial cellulitis to chronic osteomyelitis. The radiograph below demonstrates a foot lesion in a patient with diabetes. Signs and symptoms Diabetic foot infections typically take one of the following forms: Cellulitis Tender, erythematous, nonraised skin lesions are present, sometimes with lymphangitis Lymphangitis suggests group A streptococcal infection Bullae are typical of Staphylococcus aureus infection, but occasionally occur with group A streptococci · No ulcer or wound exudate is present Deep-skin and soft-tissue infections The patient may be acutely ill, with painful induration of the soft tissues in the extremity Wound discharge is usually not present In mixed infections that may involve anaerobes, crepitation may be noted over the afflicted area Extreme pain and tenderness may indicate compartment syndrome or clostridial infection (ie, gas gangrene) The tissues are not tense, and bullae may be present Discharge, if present, is often foul Acute osteomyelitis Unless peripheral neuropathy is present, the patient has pain at the site of the involved bone Usually, fever and regional adenopathy are absent Chronic osteomyelitis The patient's temperature is usually less than 102°F Discharge is commonly foul No lymphangitis is observed Pain may or may not be present, depending on the degree of peripheral neuropathy Deep, penetrating ulcers and deep sinus tracts (diagnostic of chronic osteomyelitis) are usually located between the toes or on the plantar surface of the foot The medial malleoli, shins, or heels Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Article

Diabetic Foot Care Article

A A A Diabetes mellitus (DM) represents several diseases in which high blood glucose levels over time can damage the nerves, kidneys, eyes, and blood vessels. Diabetes can also decrease the body's ability to fight infection. When diabetes is not well controlled, damage to the organs and impairment of the immune system is likely. Foot problems commonly develop in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious. With damage to the nervous system, a person with diabetes may not be able to feel his or her feet properly. Normal sweat secretion and oil production that lubricates the skin of the foot is impaired. These factors together can lead to abnormal pressure on the skin, bones, and joints of the foot during walking and can lead to breakdown of the skin of the foot. Sores may develop. Damage to blood vessels and impairment of the immune system from diabetes make it difficult to heal these wounds. Bacterial infection of the skin, connective tissues, muscles, and bones can then occur. These infections can develop into gangrene. Because of the poor blood flow, antibiotics cannot get to the site of the infection easily. Often, the only treatment for this is amputation of the foot or leg. If the infection spreads to the bloodstream, this process can be life-threatening. People with diabetes must be fully aware of how to prevent foot problems before they occur, to recognize problems early, and to seek the right treatment when problems do occur. Although treatment for diabetic foot problems has improved, prevention - including good control of blood sugar level - remains the best way to prevent diabetic complications. People with diabetes should learn how to examine their own feet and how to recognize the early signs and symptoms of diabetic foot problems. They should also l Continue reading >>

Pictures Of Diabetic Neuropathy

Pictures Of Diabetic Neuropathy

The Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy reports that 40 million Americans experience some form of peripheral neuropathy. Of these, 20 million have diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This makes DPN the most common form of peripheral neuropathy. DPN affects the nerves in the hands and feet, causing sensations like: numbness tingling pain Nerve problems may also occur in your: digestive tract heart eyes other organ systems Potential causes of nerve damage include: high blood sugar levels having had diabetes for a long time low levels of insulin or treatment with insulin inflammation in the nerves lifestyle factors, like smoking or alcohol use Scientists aren’t sure exactly how diabetes damages nerves. Some think that excess blood sugar affects the protective coating on nerves. Other scientists believe decreased blood flow to the nerves can cause damage. Either way, as the disease progresses, you may feel a tingling or numbness in your extremities, including: fingers toes hands feet You may also have a “pins-and-needles” feeling, or even a burning sensation. A nerve that’s pinched or damaged may send out signals that cause shooting pains. People also describe this sensation as an electric shock, or a sharp, stabbing pain. The pain may be the result of damaged nerves that are misfiring, or sending out mistaken signals to the brain. The sensations usually come and go. They may also remain constant at times. These types of pains are most common at night, and can disturb your sleep. Imagine how you feel if someone touches an open wound on your body. Diabetic neuropathy can cause similar sensations. When the protective covering of a nerve is damaged, you may experience extreme sensitivity in that area. At its most severe, this type of neuropathy can cause extreme pai Continue reading >>

Has Anyone Surprised You After Their Death, E.g. Receiving An Organ From A Donor, A Sizeable Inheritance, Or A Visit From A Friendly Ghost?

Has Anyone Surprised You After Their Death, E.g. Receiving An Organ From A Donor, A Sizeable Inheritance, Or A Visit From A Friendly Ghost?

My father died when I was 11. I hated him — not for dying, but for the way he lived. The last time I saw him, I was 7 years old. That was the day he abandoned my mother and me after they had had another fight. He stole the family truck, which my mother had bought, and private investigators had to find it and bring it back. He was on his way home to Oklahoma after moving the whole family to Austin, Texas, where he swore he would get an education at the University of Texas. In reality, he just drank on the couch watching TV and going to play golf. This was after he and my mother married a few months earlier. She wanted her son to have a real father, but instead, she got him. When he took off, the divorce was obvious. It must have been humiliating to my mother, but she pushed through, even when the truck died on us halfway home from Austin to our family home in Oklahoma. He had apparently sabotaged the vehicle, leaving my mother and me, his 7 year old son, stranded in the middle of nowhere Texas. We were fortunate enough to be near a truck stop somewhere outside of Waco a few miles from where the truck broke. My uncle came some time around three in the morning to tow us back to my grandmother’s home. It was disgraceful. I hated him, and when she asked if he had ever physically hurt me, I lied. He had never touched me, with malice or caress for that matter, but the point was no crime had been committed. She saw through the lie, and I told the truth at the point I realized that she would be held responsible if I lied to get him in trouble. Still, she abandoned all rights to child support just so he had no part in raising me. It would make it hard, but it was probably the best choice she ever made for me. He wasn’t a good man. And so it passed that I never saw him again Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Affect The Feet?

How Can Diabetes Affect The Feet?

People with diabetes are prone to foot problems caused by prolonged periods of high blood sugar. There are two main foot problems, each of which can have serious complications. Diabetes is a disease where the body cannot produce insulin or cannot use it effectively. Insulin is the hormone that is responsible for helping the cells take in sugar to use for energy. When this does not happen properly, the levels of sugar in the blood can become too high. Prolonged periods of high sugar levels in the blood can wreak havoc on many areas of the body, including the feet. Diabetic foot problems The two main foot problems that affect people with diabetes are: Diabetic neuropathy Over time, diabetes can cause nerve damage that makes it hard for people with diabetes to feel sensation in their extremities. The condition also makes it difficult for a person to feel an irritation on their foot or notice when their shoes are rubbing. This lack of sensation and awareness leads to an increase in the risk of cuts, sores, and blisters developing. Peripheral vascular disease Diabetes leads to changes in the blood vessels, including arteries. In peripheral vascular disease, fatty deposits block these vessels beyond the brain and heart. It tends to affect the blood vessels leading to and from the extremities, reducing blood flow to the hands and feet. Reduced blood flow can lead to pain, infection, and slow healing wounds. Severe infections may lead to amputation. Symptoms Symptoms may vary from person to person and may depend on what issues a person is experiencing at the time. Symptoms of diabetic foot problems can include the following: loss of feeling numbness or tingling sensation blisters or other wounds without painful skin discoloration skin temperature changes red streaks wounds with Continue reading >>

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