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What Diabetes Medications Cause Swelling

Seven Tips For Dealing With Diabetes-related Fluid Retention

Seven Tips For Dealing With Diabetes-related Fluid Retention

Fluid retention, also known as edema, is a problem that affects many diabetics, especially those with type 2 diabetes. Water retention can occur in any part of the legs, including the feet, ankles, calves and thighs. There are several reasons why edema occurs, such as fluid buildup or from inflammation in injured or diseased tissue and joints. Types of Edema There are three types of diabetes-related fluid retention: The first type is called macular edema. Macular edema is a swelling that occurs in the macular, which is near the center of the retina. The retina is responsible for a number of duties such as the ability to read, daytime vision and color reception. Macular edema can cause diabetic retinopathy, which starts with the leaking of fluid from blood vessels into the macula. If not treated, this condition can blind a person. Pulmonary edema is the second type of fluid retention, which occurs if someone is using certain diabetic medications and if the person has cardiovascular problems. This type of edema can be treated inserting a catheter that drains the fluids. Foot and leg edema is the third type of edema and is also the most commonly discussed. Edema in the legs and feet can cause a high risk of non-healing wounds in diabetics. This type of edema is usually treated with manual decongestive therapy and diuretics. Medication Risks for Edema People who take thiazolidinedione medications are known to experience water retention. Thiazolidinediones are commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes as they help the body produce more insulin. However, one of the downsides of this medication is that it can lead to weight gain and edema. Preventing and Treating Edema Edema can have a lot of harmful effects if not treated like loss of vision. One of the main ways to stop fluid r Continue reading >>

5 Tips To Reduce Feet, Leg And Ankle Swelling

5 Tips To Reduce Feet, Leg And Ankle Swelling

Swollen ankles and feet can be painful, and are common for those with diabetes. Standing or walking for long periods of time can cause an abnormal fluid buildup in the ankles, feet and legs — especially among older adults. Here are some tips that may help. Continue reading >>

Swollen Ankle And Leg

Swollen Ankle And Leg

The ankles and legs are common sites of swelling because of gravity’s effect on the fluids in your body. However, fluid retention is not the only cause of a swollen ankle or leg. Injuries and subsequent inflammation can also cause fluid retention and swelling. A swollen ankle or leg can cause the lower part of the leg to appear larger than normal. The swelling can make it difficult to walk. It may be painful and make the skin feel tight and stretched over your leg. While the condition is not always a reason for concern, knowing its cause can help rule out a more serious problem. If you stand for a large parts of the day, you may develop a swollen ankle or leg. Older age can also make swelling more likely. A long flight or car ride may cause a swollen angle, leg, or foot, too. Certain medical conditions can also cause a swollen ankle or leg. These include: being overweight venous insufficiency pregnancy rheumatoid arthritis blood clots in the leg heart failure kidney failure leg infection liver failure lymphedema, or swelling caused by a blockage in the lymphatic system previous surgery, such as pelvic, leg, ankle, or foot surgery Taking certain medications can also lead to swelling in the ankle or leg. These include: calcium channel blockers used to treat high blood pressure, including nifedipine, amlodipine, and verapamil hormone medications, such as birth control pills, estrogen, or testosterone steroids Inflammation due to acute or chronic injury can also cause a swollen ankle or leg. Conditions that can cause this type of inflammation include: ankle sprain osteoarthritis gout broken leg Achilles tendon rupture ACL tear Edema Edema is a type of swelling that occurs when extra fluid flows into certain areas of your body. It usually affects the: legs arms hands ankle Continue reading >>

Swollen Ankles And Swollen Feet

Swollen Ankles And Swollen Feet

Swollen ankles and swollen feet definition and facts Swelling of the ankle and feet is relatively frequent symptom in most people. In itself it does not represent a disease but rather the symptom of an underlying disease. Causes of swollen ankles and feet are numerous including: Dependent swelling (edema) Medications Injuries Infections Others (infrequent causes) Most people who spend time standing or sitting and those people with causes listed above are at risk for feet and ankle swelling. Swelling symptoms depend on the underlying cause so symptoms may range from a painless increase in foot and ankle diameter (size) to skin changes of color, and texture changes that may be localized to one or both or ankles. Other symptoms may include warm skin and ulceration with pus drainage Almost all feet and ankle swelling is diagnosed by clinical observation and physical examination; tests are ordered to diagnose underlying causes Treatment of swollen feet and ankles is dependent on diagnosing the underlying cause(s); some people require no treatment while others with underlying cause(s) may require several different treatments. Complications vary according to the underlying disease process and vary from no complications to skin ulcerations that can lead to infection and death Swollen ankles and swollen feet may be prevented in many people by simple methods, but in some individuals, symptom reduction or prevention is dependent on more complex methods related to the underlying cause(s). Burning or Swollen Feet? What Foot Pain Says About Your Health What are the most common causes swollen ankles and swollen feet? The causes of swollen feet and ankles are numerous; the following is a list of most of the major causes with some examples. Dependent swelling (or edema): swelling due to Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Many people using Januvia do not have serious side effects. Side effects that may occur with Januvia include: headache, joint or muscle pain, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, or constipation. Although Januvia by itself usually does not cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low blood sugar may occur if Januvia is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Januvia including pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, shortness of breath, or severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads [especially in the face or upper body] and causes blistering and peeling). The recommended dose of Januvia is 100 mg once daily. Januvia may interact with digoxin, probenecid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. During pregnancy Januvia should be used only when prescribed. Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Cons Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Edema

Diabetes And Edema

Edema is a medical condition caused by the abnormal fluid retention in the spaces between the body's cells or in the circulatory system. This medical condition causes puffiness and swelling in several areas of the body, including legs, arms, feet, hands, lungs, heart, or stomach area. Is there a connection between edema and diabetes? Let’s find out. There are basically three main types of edema associated with diabetes - macular edema, pulmonary edema, and foot and leg edema. The causes of diabetic edema include: Acute liver failure, cirrhosis Renal artery stenosis Chronic hepatitis Cardiovascular complications Nephrotic Syndrome or acute renal failure Medications used to treat diabetes Other factors such as premenstrual fluid retention, thiamine deficiency, protein losing enteropathy, pregnancy and acute anaphylaxis, also contribute to diabetic edema. Macular edema is a condition in which the macular tissue area, near the center of the retina gets filled with fluid. This area is mainly responsible for vision. Macular edema caused from diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes. The vision loss can progress, leading to eventual blindness. There are two types of macular edema, focal macular edema and diffuse macular edema. The first one is caused by vascular abnormalities, and can be treated using focal laser treatment. The second type is caused by dilated retinal capillaries. This condition can be treated with grid laser treatment, which is used to seal the leakages. Macular edema is caused by the increasing deposition of fluids and proteins on or under the macula of the eye. The macula is identified as a pale yellow area close to the center of the retina. A local swelling results from fluid and protein retention in the macula. The swelling soon directly press Continue reading >>

Remedies For Edema: Swollen Feet, Swollen Ankles, Swollen Hands And The Rest Of You

Remedies For Edema: Swollen Feet, Swollen Ankles, Swollen Hands And The Rest Of You

If you are someone who puffs up with water retention in the warm weather, the prospect of cooler days might be a relief (although damp, heavy weather can make you swell up, too). Or you may be someone whose calves, ankles and feet are often a little “cushiony” with water retention despite the weather. They may be so cushiony that they dimple when you press into them. That kind of swelling can be painful, too—and it can be a sign of a serious health problem, even a medical emergency. But for most people who deal with limb swelling—men and women alike—it is simply a recurring nuisance that a doctor may or may not be able to diagnose. Here are some surefire remedies to soothe the swelling…and also advice for when limb swelling might be life-threatening… Swelling caused by fluid buildup is called edema (pronounced “ih-dee-mah”). When it affects only your arms, legs, hands and feet, it is called peripheral edema. We retain water because blood vessels in our arms, legs, hands and feet expand, or dilate. This dilation can be caused by hot or humid weather or a number of other causes. The dilation makes it easier for fluid to leak out of blood vessels into surrounding tissue, causing the tissue to swell. Sitting or standing in one position for a long time without moving makes the swelling worse because gravity just pulls all that fluid down to pool in your hands, legs and feet. Besides weather-related effects on blood vessels, the reason why some people swell can’t always be figured out, but common disease-related causes of swelling are kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. Whether a doctor can or cannot pinpoint the cause of peripheral edema, he or she too often prescribes a diuretic and suggests that you cut back on salt. Although cutting back on salt Continue reading >>

Water Retention

Water Retention

Water retention, also known as Edema, is caused by a few different reasons and is common in those who have diabetes. It might be from a mild illness or condition. Other times when someone has water retention it could mean something more serious is happening in the body. Water retention is common in: Ankles Feet Wrists Arms It is best to see a Doctor to make sure the cause of the water retention is not serious and that it can be cured. Diseases in the Kidneys, Liver, and Heart are known for expressing water. People who have Diabetes and take Thiazolidinediones medications are also known to have water retention. Thiazolidinediones are commonly used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. It helps the body produce more insulin. Thiazolidinediones can cause: Weight gain Edema (Swelling) These symptoms usually go away after a few weeks of taking the treatment. There are three types of Edema that are associated with Diabetes. Macular Edema Macular Edema is one of the types. It consists of swelling in the macular which is near the retina’s center. This is the area that helps a person be able to read. It is also responsible for daytime vision and color reception. Diabetic Retinopathy caused Macular Edema is a complication caused by Diabetes. It starts by the leaking of fluid from blood vessels into the macula. Eventually this can cause the person to go blind. Pulmonary Edema Pulmonary Edema is the second type. This happens if someone is using certain Diabetic medications and also if the person has cardiovascular problems. Treating this type of Edema consists of inserting a catheter which drains the fluids. Foot and Leg Edema Foot and Leg Edema is also a type that is experienced. This type of Edema can cause a high risk of non-healing wounds with someone who has Diabetes. Treatment for this Continue reading >>

What Medications Can Cause Swollen Ankles And Feet?

What Medications Can Cause Swollen Ankles And Feet?

ANSWER Many drugs can cause swelling in the feet and ankles as a possible side effect. They include: Hormones such as estrogen (found in oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy) and testosterone Calcium channel blockers, a type of blood pressure medication, which includes nifedipine (Adalat, Afeditab, Nifediac, Nifedical, Procardia), amlodipine (Norvasc), diltiazem (Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Diltia, Tiazac), felodipine (Plendil), and verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Verelan) Steroids, including androgenic and anabolic steroids and corticosteroids such as prednisone Antidepressants, including: tricyclics, such as nortriptyline (Pamelor, Aventyl), desipramine (Norpramin), and amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep, Vanatrip); and monoamine oxidase inhibitors such as phenelzine (Nardil) and tranylcypromine (Parnate) Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Diabetes medications Continue reading >>

Diabetic Legs Swelling Causes And Remedies

Diabetic Legs Swelling Causes And Remedies

Many people suffering from diabetes complain about swelling in legs and feet. Usually, this swelling is painless and due to retention of fluid. There can be numerous reasons leading to such retention, from very high and uncontrolled sugar levels (which is dangerous for various organs) to the secondary complications of diabetes. Usually, fluid retention indicates that either heart of a diabetic person has become weak. Thus there is a poor flow of fluids, or kidneys are not functioning properly. In some cases, it may be due to liver disease or some anti-diabetic medications. Other reasons of such swelling could be a disease of blood vessels, or deficit of certain micronutrients and electrolytes(“Swelling and Diabetes – Swollen Legs, Ankle & Feet, Peripheral Edema,” n.d.). Let us look in detail at some leading causes of swelling of legs in diabetes. Congested heart failure The major complication of diabetes is weakening of heart and blood vessels. Congested Heart Failure (CHF) often coexists in diabetes(Nasir & Aguilar, 2012). In fact, a person suffering from diabetes is at much higher risk of heart failure(Nichols, Gullion, Koro, Ephross, & Brown, 2004). In CHF though the heart is functioning, but its pumping power is compromised, which means that it is not strong enough for blood to circulate properly in our body. Things are further made worse by stiffening of arteries(“Heart failure,” n.d.). All this leads to swelling and accumulation of fluids in the legs. Kidney failure More than one-third people suffering from diabetes have chronic kidney disease(“Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease,” 2014). Diabetes is slowly emerging one of the leading causes of chronic kidney disease. Almost half of people going for dialysis, also have diabetes(Cavanaugh, 2007). In d Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes?

What Causes Diabetes?

Little Known Factors That Lead To Diabetes What are some of the lifestyle, genetics and other not-so-obvious factors that can trigger diabetes? What can you do to prevent this condition? Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It affects over 29.1 million people in the U.S. – 9.3 percent of the population in the U.S. Another 86 million Americans have prediabetes and aren’t even aware of it. The cause of diabetes is the absence or insufficient production of the hormone insulin, which lowers blood sugar in the body. Two types of diabetes There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2, which are also known as insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is less common: it affects only 1 in 250 Americans and only occurs in individuals younger than age 20. It has no known cure. A majority of type 2 diabetes cases can be prevented or cured. Signs and symptoms Among the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased urine Excessive thirst Weight loss Hunger Fatigue Skin problems Slow-healing wounds Yeast infections Tingling or numbness in feet or toes Various factors Research has proven that there are certain lifestyle and genetic factors that lead to diabetes. Among them are: Leading a non-active lifestyle A family history of diabetes High blood pressure (hypertension) Low levels of the good cholesterol (HDL) Elevated levels of triglycerides (a type of fat) in the blood Increasing age Polycystic ovary syndrome Impaired glucose tolerance Insulin resistance Gestational diabetes during a pregnancy Some ethnic backgrounds (African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans and Alaska natives) are at greater risk of diabetes. Get t Continue reading >>

Which Psychiatric Medications Are Known To Cause Diabetes?

Which Psychiatric Medications Are Known To Cause Diabetes?

No medication causes diabetes. We actually don't know what causes diabetes, but the current theory is a combination of genetics, environmental factors, and lifestyle choices. Per your certainty that one particular medication causes diabetes because you got diabetes after taking that medication, I got diabetes after directing my high school play. I guess high school plays must cause diabetes. Or not. That's not how it works. Y’know that old saying “correlation does not mean causation”? It's true. Continue reading >>

Edema

Edema

Abnormal accumulation of fluid in various body tissues, causing swelling. The swelling may affect any of a number of body sites, such as the legs, ankles, and feet; the hands; the back or abdomen; and even the eyelids. Edema may be caused by a number of different medical conditions and can also be a side effect of certain drugs. Here are some possible causes: Congestive heart failure may result in edema. To compensate for heart failure, in which the heart fails to circulate adequate amounts of blood, the kidneys retain sodium to help the body hold on to water and increase the volume of blood. Deep vein thrombosis, the formation of a blood clot in a deep vein within the leg, can cause edema by damaging the valves within the veins that control normal blood flow. This type of edema most commonly makes the ankles swell but may also cause swelling in the calf or even the thigh. Kidney diseases, such as diabetic nephropathy, may cause edema due to excess sodium and fluid retention. Edema may be a side effect of certain drugs, including the oral diabetes drugs pioglitazone (brand name Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia). People sometimes experience mild edema when starting on insulin therapy, but this generally goes away within a few weeks. If you experience any unusual swelling, be sure to contact your doctor. It may be the result of a medical condition you don’t know you have. Treating edema involves treating the underlying medical condition that is causing it or adjusting medication as necessary. This article was written by Robert S. Dinsmoor, a Contributing Editor of Diabetes Self-Management. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provide Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Hand Swelling?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Hand Swelling?

OK, so first up a great big disclaimer: I am not a doctor. All this information if from a google search so take this as a call to action and go see an actual doctor. Now it may not be diabetes, there are a great many things that can cause swelling. It is likely burst blood vessels caused by high sugar. (diabetes) It could be a side effect of medication. It could be water retention. I don’t actually know. What I do know is that if your hands stay that way you run a real risk of having them amputated after they turn gangrenous and infected. Continue reading >>

Medications For Diabetic Macular Edema

Medications For Diabetic Macular Edema

This medication may not be approved by the FDA for the treatment of this condition. Prescription Only / Over the Counter Rx Prescription Only OTC Over the Counter Rx/OTC Prescription or Over the Counter Pregnancy A Adequate and well-controlled studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in the first trimester of pregnancy (and there is no evidence of risk in later trimesters). B Animal reproduction studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. C Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use in pregnant women despite potential risks. D There is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience or studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use in pregnant women despite potential risks. X Studies in animals or humans have demonstrated fetal abnormalities and/or there is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience, and the risks involved in use in pregnant women clearly outweigh potential benefits. N FDA has not classified the drug. Controlled Substances Act Schedule N Is not subject to the Controlled Substances Act. 1 Has a high potential for abuse. Has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. There is a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision. 2 Has a high potential for abuse. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States or a currently accepted medical use with severe restrictions. Abuse may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence Continue reading >>

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