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What Diabetes Medications Cause Swelling

Seven Tips For Dealing With Diabetes-related Fluid Retention

Seven Tips For Dealing With Diabetes-related Fluid Retention

Fluid retention, also known as edema, is a problem that affects many diabetics, especially those with type 2 diabetes. Water retention can occur in any part of the legs, including the feet, ankles, calves and thighs. There are several reasons why edema occurs, such as fluid buildup or from inflammation in injured or diseased tissue and joints. Types of Edema There are three types of diabetes-related fluid retention: The first type is called macular edema. Macular edema is a swelling that occurs in the macular, which is near the center of the retina. The retina is responsible for a number of duties such as the ability to read, daytime vision and color reception. Macular edema can cause diabetic retinopathy, which starts with the leaking of fluid from blood vessels into the macula. If not treated, this condition can blind a person. Pulmonary edema is the second type of fluid retention, which occurs if someone is using certain diabetic medications and if the person has cardiovascular problems. This type of edema can be treated inserting a catheter that drains the fluids. Foot and leg edema is the third type of edema and is also the most commonly discussed. Edema in the legs and feet can cause a high risk of non-healing wounds in diabetics. This type of edema is usually treated with manual decongestive therapy and diuretics. Medication Risks for Edema People who take thiazolidinedione medications are known to experience water retention. Thiazolidinediones are commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes as they help the body produce more insulin. However, one of the downsides of this medication is that it can lead to weight gain and edema. Preventing and Treating Edema Edema can have a lot of harmful effects if not treated like loss of vision. One of the main ways to stop fluid r Continue reading >>

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes Basics

Basics of diabetes Diabetes is a condition caused by lack of a chemical in the body (a hormone) called insulin. There are two major forms of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes eventually no insulin is produced and individuals require insulin injections for survival. It used to be thought this only presented in children, but it is now clear this can occur at any age. The other more common form of diabetes called type 2 diabetes occurs due to the body's resistance to the effects of insulin in addition to an insufficient quantity of insulin. However, in this type of diabetes there is usually some insulin produced. For both types of diabetes, blood glucose levels are elevated. Furthermore, people with diabetes are prone to certain complications not seen in those without diabetes. These complications involve the eye (retinopathy), kidney (nephropathy) and nerves (neuropathy). People with diabetes also get early hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), leading to early heart attacks and strokes. The good news for people with diabetes is that with proper care all of these problems can be avoided. Immediate medical attention Uncontrolled diabetes presents with frequent thirst and urination. Over time, patients will become dehydrated as the glucose is "spilling" over into the urine. If insulin deficiency is severe enough, fat stores are used for energy as glucose cannot get into cells. This problem is much more common with type 1 diabetes and is called "ketoacidosis". It can be diagnosed at home with a simple urine test. When significant ketones are found in the urine, it is important to be in touch with a physician immediately. There are other conditions that require immediate attention. Blurry vision in someone with known diabetic eye disease or someone with a long history of di Continue reading >>

Pioglitazone

Pioglitazone

Pioglitazone and other similar medications for diabetes may cause or worsen heart failure (condition in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood to the other parts of the body). Before you start to take pioglitazone, tell your doctor if you have or have ever had heart failure, especially if your heart failure is so severe that you must limit your activity and are only comfortable when you are at rest or you must remain in a chair or bed. Also tell your doctor if you were born with a heart defect, and if you have or have ever had swelling of the arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; heart disease; high cholesterol or fats in the blood; high blood pressure; coronary artery disease (narrowing of the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart); a heart attack; an irregular heartbeat; or sleep apnea. Your doctor may tell you not to take pioglitazone or may monitor you carefully during your treatment. If you develop heart failure, you may experience certain symptoms. Tell your doctor immediately if you have any of the following symptoms, especially when you first start taking pioglitazone or after your dose is increased: large weight gain in a short period of time; shortness of breath; swelling of the arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; swelling or pain in the stomach; waking up short of breath during the night; needing to sleep with extra pillows under your head in order to breathe easier while lying down; frequent dry cough or wheezing; difficulty thinking clearly or confusion; fast or racing heart beat; not able to walk or exercise as well; or increased tiredness. Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer's patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with pioglitazone and each time you refill your prescription. Rea Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Edema

Diabetes And Edema

Edema is a medical condition caused by the abnormal fluid retention in the spaces between the body's cells or in the circulatory system. This medical condition causes puffiness and swelling in several areas of the body, including legs, arms, feet, hands, lungs, heart, or stomach area. Is there a connection between edema and diabetes? Let’s find out. There are basically three main types of edema associated with diabetes - macular edema, pulmonary edema, and foot and leg edema. The causes of diabetic edema include: Acute liver failure, cirrhosis Renal artery stenosis Chronic hepatitis Cardiovascular complications Nephrotic Syndrome or acute renal failure Medications used to treat diabetes Other factors such as premenstrual fluid retention, thiamine deficiency, protein losing enteropathy, pregnancy and acute anaphylaxis, also contribute to diabetic edema. Macular edema is a condition in which the macular tissue area, near the center of the retina gets filled with fluid. This area is mainly responsible for vision. Macular edema caused from diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes. The vision loss can progress, leading to eventual blindness. There are two types of macular edema, focal macular edema and diffuse macular edema. The first one is caused by vascular abnormalities, and can be treated using focal laser treatment. The second type is caused by dilated retinal capillaries. This condition can be treated with grid laser treatment, which is used to seal the leakages. Macular edema is caused by the increasing deposition of fluids and proteins on or under the macula of the eye. The macula is identified as a pale yellow area close to the center of the retina. A local swelling results from fluid and protein retention in the macula. The swelling soon directly press Continue reading >>

Diabetic Medications That Cause Leg Swelling

Diabetic Medications That Cause Leg Swelling

Many different types of oral medications help treat type II diabetes, and some may produce side effects such as swelling. If your legs swell when you take diabetes medications, call your doctor. He may need to change medicines. The only medication for people with type I diabetes is insulin, which does not produce swelling. Video of the Day Rosiglitazone may cause swelling in your body, as well as weight gain, according to Drugs.com. Before starting this diabetic medication, inform your doctor if you have a history of heart problems. Drugs.com says that rosiglitazone may raise the level of risk of heart attacks. For this reason, your doctor only should prescribe it if other diabetic drugs do not work for you. Metformin, often the first medication your doctor will prescribe for Type II diabetes, helps to control glucose levels by restricting how much sugar your body absorbs. It also helps your liver and cells to become more sensitive to the insulin your pancreas secretes so your body can use glucose more effectively. Metformin may cause swelling in your body, including your legs, according to the Mayo Clinic. Metformin and Pioglitazone Combination Your physician may prescribe a drug for your Type II diabetes that contains a combination of metformin and pioglitazone that may produce swelling in your legs, according to the Mayo Clinics. Pioglitazone works by making the appropriate parts of your body -- such as the muscle cells, fat cells and liver -- use insulin more effectively. Together, these two medications in one pill may cause swelling in your body and weight gain, according to Drugs.com. If swelling occurs, it may reduce the circulation of blood in your body, so your doctor may need to switch medications. Talk with your doctor if you have a history of heart or kidney Continue reading >>

These 7 Medications Can Cause Puffy Legs And Ankles

These 7 Medications Can Cause Puffy Legs And Ankles

Medications are a common offender when it comes to lower extremity edema, either as the cause or as a factor that can make it worse. Swelling in the lower legs from fluid in the tissues—lower extremity edema—is a familiar complaint among patients. Imprints from your socks, puffy legs and feet so you can’t put your shoes on, or swelling so that you can make an indent with your thumb (pitting edema) may lead you to wonder what’s going on. One clue that your medication could be the cause: you have edema on both sides (it’s bilateral). Swelling from a clot in the leg, a “DVT” or deep venous thromboembolism, is usually on one side not both. Other causes of bilateral lower extremity edema is dependent edema (your legs have been in a dependent position for a while—sitting or standing for long periods of time), or more complex conditions like chronic venous disease, lymphedema, or heart failure. If you do start to have lower extremity edema on both sides of your body, look at this list and make sure you aren’t taking one of these seven medications. Amlodipine (Norvasc) is a medication used to lower blood pressure. The higher the dose, the more likely you are to have swelling in both of your legs and feet. Edema occurs in 1.8% of folks taking 2.5 mg, 3% of folks taking 5 mg, and almost 11% of those taking 10 mg of amlodipine. So one in ten of you will have swelling when taking amlodipine 10 mg daily. More women taking amlodipine experience edema in their lower extremities: 15% of women compared to 5.6% of men. Other options exist for lowering blood pressure that don’t cause swelling in the legs, so if this is a problem for you, ask your doctor about switching up. Gabapentin (Neurontin) is used for the treatment of neuropathic pain—pain after a shingles outb Continue reading >>

Swollen Ankles And Feet

Swollen Ankles And Feet

5. Infection Swelling in the feet and ankles can be a sign of infection. People with diabetic neuropathy or other nerve problems of the feet are at greater risk of foot infections. If you have diabetes, it is important to inspect your feet daily for blisters and sores, because nerve damage can blunt the pain sensation and foot problems can progress quickly. If you notice a swollen foot or blister that appears to be infected, seek medical advice straight away. 6. Blood clot Blood clots that form in the veins of the legs can stop the return flow of blood from the legs back to the heart and cause swelling in the ankles and feet. Blood clots can be either superficial (occurring in the veins just beneath the skin), or deep (a condition known as deep vein thrombosis). Deep clots can block one or more of the major veins of the legs. These blood clots can be life-threatening if they break loose and travel to the heart and lungs. If you have swelling in one leg, along with pain, a slight fever and possibly a change in colour of the affected leg, seek medical advice immediately. Treatment with blood thinners may be necessary. 7. Heart, liver or kidney disease Sometimes swelling can indicate a problem such as heart, liver or kidney disease. Ankles that swell could be a sign of heart failure. Kidney disease can also cause foot and ankle swelling. When kidneys are not functioning properly, fluid can build up in the body. Liver disease can affect the liver's production of a protein called albumin, which keeps the blood from leaking out of the blood vessels into the surrounding tissues. Inadequate albumin production can lead to fluid leakage. Gravity causes fluid to accumulate more in the feet and ankles, but fluid can also accumulate in the abdomen and chest. If your swelling is acco Continue reading >>

Water Retention

Water Retention

Water retention, also known as Edema, is caused by a few different reasons and is common in those who have diabetes. It might be from a mild illness or condition. Other times when someone has water retention it could mean something more serious is happening in the body. Water retention is common in: Ankles Feet Wrists Arms It is best to see a Doctor to make sure the cause of the water retention is not serious and that it can be cured. Diseases in the Kidneys, Liver, and Heart are known for expressing water. People who have Diabetes and take Thiazolidinediones medications are also known to have water retention. Thiazolidinediones are commonly used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. It helps the body produce more insulin. Thiazolidinediones can cause: Weight gain Edema (Swelling) These symptoms usually go away after a few weeks of taking the treatment. There are three types of Edema that are associated with Diabetes. Macular Edema Macular Edema is one of the types. It consists of swelling in the macular which is near the retina’s center. This is the area that helps a person be able to read. It is also responsible for daytime vision and color reception. Diabetic Retinopathy caused Macular Edema is a complication caused by Diabetes. It starts by the leaking of fluid from blood vessels into the macula. Eventually this can cause the person to go blind. Pulmonary Edema Pulmonary Edema is the second type. This happens if someone is using certain Diabetic medications and also if the person has cardiovascular problems. Treating this type of Edema consists of inserting a catheter which drains the fluids. Foot and Leg Edema Foot and Leg Edema is also a type that is experienced. This type of Edema can cause a high risk of non-healing wounds with someone who has Diabetes. Treatment for this Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Water Retention: How Are They Related?

Diabetes And Water Retention: How Are They Related?

By pH health care professionals If you have diabetes, or if someone close to you does, perhaps you’ve noticed some swelling in the ankles where fluid has built up, causing a puffy appearance. This is typically water retention, also called edema, and is relatively common among diabetics. Let’s take a look at how diabetes and water retention are related. What is water retention? Water retention is a buildup of fluid in an area of the body, causing swelling, often in the ankles, feet, wrists and/or arms. So, how are diabetes and water retention related? The most common type of water retention is in the legs and feet (peripheral edema). Sometimes, water retention occurs as a side effect of insulin therapy or diabetes drugs. Peripheral edema is sometimes a symptom of kidney problems or heart failure related to diabetes. However, water retention can occur as a result of an injury, surgery, long plane rides, pregnancy, hormone changes and certain medications. But if you have diabetes, you need to be extra cautious as water retention can make it more difficult for wounds to heal. Read here for other causes of water retention. So, how can you be more proactive? Work with a doctor. While the water retention itself may not seem to be giving you any trouble, it may be a red flag for something else, so it’s important to be proactive and tell your doctor right away about any swelling. Utilize body composition testing on a regular basis. You can gauge whether your body’s fluids are out of balance even before you see significant swelling through body composition testing. It only takes a few minutes to get information that can save you time, money and stress. Be proactive. Get to the root cause of your water retention. There may be other factors including problems with the thyro Continue reading >>

Swollen Ankle And Leg

Swollen Ankle And Leg

The ankles and legs are common sites of swelling because of gravity’s effect on the fluids in your body. However, fluid retention is not the only cause of a swollen ankle or leg. Injuries and subsequent inflammation can also cause fluid retention and swelling. A swollen ankle or leg can cause the lower part of the leg to appear larger than normal. The swelling can make it difficult to walk. It may be painful and make the skin feel tight and stretched over your leg. While the condition is not always a reason for concern, knowing its cause can help rule out a more serious problem. If you stand for a large parts of the day, you may develop a swollen ankle or leg. Older age can also make swelling more likely. A long flight or car ride may cause a swollen angle, leg, or foot, too. Certain medical conditions can also cause a swollen ankle or leg. These include: being overweight venous insufficiency pregnancy rheumatoid arthritis blood clots in the leg heart failure kidney failure leg infection liver failure lymphedema, or swelling caused by a blockage in the lymphatic system previous surgery, such as pelvic, leg, ankle, or foot surgery Taking certain medications can also lead to swelling in the ankle or leg. These include: calcium channel blockers used to treat high blood pressure, including nifedipine, amlodipine, and verapamil hormone medications, such as birth control pills, estrogen, or testosterone steroids Inflammation due to acute or chronic injury can also cause a swollen ankle or leg. Conditions that can cause this type of inflammation include: ankle sprain osteoarthritis gout broken leg Achilles tendon rupture ACL tear Edema Edema is a type of swelling that occurs when extra fluid flows into certain areas of your body. It usually affects the: legs arms hands ankle Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Edema

Everything You Need To Know About Edema

Edema is swelling that occurs when too much fluid becomes trapped in the tissues of the body, particularly the skin. There are different causes and types of edema. Pulmonary edema, for example, affects the lungs, while pedal edema causes swelling in the feet. Edema usually starts slowly, but onset can be sudden. It is a common problem, but it can also be the sign of a serious condition. This MNT Knowledge Center article will explain what edema is and how to recognize it, as as the different types and treatments of edema. The article will also look at possible complications of the condition. Here are some key points about edema. More detail is in the main article. Edema happens when excess fluid stays within the body's tissues. There is usually an underlying disease or condition. Symptoms depend on the cause, and they normally develop gradually. Medications are available to treat edema. What is edema? Edema refers to swelling and puffiness in different areas of the body. It most often occurs in the skin, especially on the hands, arms, ankles, legs, and feet. However, it can also affect the muscles, bowels, lungs, eyes, and brain. The condition mainly occurs in older adults and women who are pregnant, but anyone can experience edema. Symptoms Symptoms depend on the underlying cause, but swelling, tightness, and pain are common. A person with edema may notice: swollen, stretched, and shiny skin skin that retains a dimple after being pressed for a few seconds puffiness of the ankles, face, or eyes aching body parts and stiff joints weight gain or loss fuller hand and neck veins abdominal pain changes in bowel habits nausea and vomiting confusion and lethargy visual abnormalities Symptoms depend on the underlying cause, the type of edema, and where the edema is located. Trea Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Hand Swelling?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Hand Swelling?

OK, so first up a great big disclaimer: I am not a doctor. All this information if from a google search so take this as a call to action and go see an actual doctor. Now it may not be diabetes, there are a great many things that can cause swelling. It is likely burst blood vessels caused by high sugar. (diabetes) It could be a side effect of medication. It could be water retention. I don’t actually know. What I do know is that if your hands stay that way you run a real risk of having them amputated after they turn gangrenous and infected. Continue reading >>

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Tweet Edema (known as oedema in the UK) is a build up of fluid in the body (water retention) which causes swelling. Edema commonly affects the legs, ankles, feet and wrist. Water retention is often treatable, with treatment varying depending on the cause. Symptoms of edema The main symptom of edema is swelling of the affected area. Other symptoms that may occur, along with swelling, include: Weight gain Aching limbs Stiff joints Discolouration of skin Hypertension (high blood pressure) What causes swelling in the legs, feet and ankles? Swollen ankles and legs will often be brought on, or aggravated, by long periods of standing. A number of medications can increase the risk of oedema. Such medications include corticosteroids, blood pressure medications and the contraceptive pill. Water retention may also be caused by a number of conditions including: A high intake of salt can increase the problems of swelling in people with kidney disease. Treatment for edema Treatment for edema may vary depending on the cause. Water retention may be resolved if the underlying cause can be adequately treated. Regular physical activity and preventing long periods of standing can help reduce water retention. A low dietary salt intake is advisable, particularly if fluid retention has been brought on by kidney disease. If you are overweight, weight loss can help with reducing fluid retention. Diuretics, also known as ‘water tablets’, help to remove fluid from the body and may be prescribed for some causes of oedema. Prevention You can reduce your risk of edema by taking steps to prevent kidney disease and heart failure from developing. This can be achieved through good control of blood glucose levels, regular exercise and a healthy diet. If you can avoid long periods of standing, this wi Continue reading >>

Quick Tips: Stroke Symptoms, Swollen Legs, And Glucose Levels

Quick Tips: Stroke Symptoms, Swollen Legs, And Glucose Levels

Lots of questions from listeners on the show this week and time did not permit me to get to all of them. So nothing fancy in this post. Just quick answers on a range of topics from actual listeners. If you missed the show, the podcast is here (click the logo) for you to listen to on your computer, phone, or whereever: Just like on the radio show, I can’t give complete answers to questions here. Always good to check with your own doctor. Here’s how this post will go. I’ll cover 3 topics in a bit of depth: swollen legs, blood glucose, and recognizing a stroke. Although all are important, I really want you to know the symptoms of stroke so I’ll start with that. At the end I’ll do a few quick “lighting round” questions. Fasten your seatbelts. Recognizing a stroke: Act FAST This topic was raised by a listener via the text line and I briefly answered it on the live broadcast. It is so important that I want to repeat it here. Since stroke is a top cause of death (I think it is #5 currently) and since it is one condition (like heart attack) where quite literally every second counts, all people should know the basic symptoms. If you have any of these, you need to go immediately to an Emergency Department (you should call 911). There is simple memory tool to help: FAST Remember to Act FAST: F = FACE. One side of the face droops when smiling. A = ARMS. One arm droops when both arms are held out in front S = SPEECH. Strange or slurred speech. T = TIME to call 911. If any of the above 3 things are present, CALL 911 now. In stroke, it is good to know exactly when the person was last seen to be normal. In other words, the nearer you can pinpoint when the symptoms occurred (remember in stroke the symptoms come on suddenly) the better the treatment decisions can be made. T Continue reading >>

Peripheral Edema And Diabetes

Peripheral Edema And Diabetes

Peripheral edema is swelling from the collection of fluid in the feet, ankles, and legs. It can occur in one or both of your lower extremities. If you have diabetes, you need to take extra precautions when you have edema. Edema is the result of damage to capillaries or increased pressure causing capillaries to leak fluid into surrounding tissues and result in swelling. People with diabetes often have circulation problems that can cause wounds to heal slowly or not at all. Edema makes it more difficult for wounds to heal. Therefore, controlling edema is essential. Causes There are many common causes of edema that are fairly benign. Some examples of more common causes of peripheral edema, not specifically related to diabetes, include physical inactivity, standing or sitting for long periods of time, surgery, burns, hot weather, pregnancy, menstruation, menopause, contraceptive pills, certain medications, excessive salt intake, malnutrition, or a bad diet. Edema may present in only one extremity (rather than both) due to deep venous thrombosis (DVT), cellulitis, osteomyelitis, trauma, a ruptured Baker's cyst, or a lymphatic obstruction. Peripheral edema can also be associated with more serious conditions—many of which can be associated with diabetes complications such as heart disease, venous insufficiency, liver disease, and kidney disease. Certain diabetes medications can also cause edema, specifically the thiazolidinedione drugs Actos and Avandia. These drugs have come under a cloud because of their potential cardiac adverse effects, and should not be used in anyone who has had a history of congestive heart failure. People with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or heart failure (such as congestive heart failure). If the patient has neuropathy, the sym Continue reading >>

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