diabetestalk.net

What Color Stands For Diabetes?

Impairment Of Colour Vision In Diabetes With No Retinopathy: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology And Molecular Genetics Study (sndreams- Ii, Report 3)

Impairment Of Colour Vision In Diabetes With No Retinopathy: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology And Molecular Genetics Study (sndreams- Ii, Report 3)

Impairment of Colour Vision in Diabetes with No Retinopathy: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SNDREAMS- II, Report 3) We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Impairment of Colour Vision in Diabetes with No Retinopathy: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SNDREAMS- II, Report 3) Laxmi Gella, Rajiv Raman, [...], and Tarun Sharma To assess impairment of colour vision in type 2 diabetics with no diabetic retinopathy and elucidate associated risk factors in a population-based cross-sectional study. This is part of Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular-genetics Study (SN-DREAMS II) which was conducted between 20072010. FM 100 hue-test was performed in 253 subjects with no clinical evidence of diabetic retinopathy. All subjects underwent detailed ophthalmic evaluation including cataract grading using LOCS III and 45 4-field stereoscopic fundus photography. Various ocular and systemic risk factors for impairment of colour vision (ICV) were assessed in subjects with diabetes but no retinopathy. P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The mean age of the study sample was 57.08 9.21 (range: 4486 years). Gender adjusted prevalence of ICV among subjects with diabetes with no retinopathy was 39.5% (CI: 33.545.5). The mean total error score in the study sample was 197.77 100 (range: 19583). T Continue reading >>

Jdrf Is True Blue For National Diabetes Awareness Month

Jdrf Is True Blue For National Diabetes Awareness Month

Fall is arriving in all its usual glorious colors—pumpkin orange, apple red, forest green, and … blue? That’s right. Thanks to National Diabetes Awareness Month, blue is the color to flaunt this November. This year’s theme is “All for 1!” and the type 1 diabetes (T1D) community will have ample opportunity to showcase its team spirit. November is truly a month of wonders—World Diabetes Day falls on November 14, the anniversary of insulin discoverer Frederick Banting’s birth. But even before that, on November 1, JDRF will be celebrating the second annual T1Day. Inaugurated by JDRF on November 1, 2011 (11-1-11), T1Day is an occasion to use our collective voice to reach as many people around the world as we can, to raise awareness about T1D and celebrate the lives of those who live with T1D and those who love them. Just a few of the plans we have in store: the national office of JDRF is creating public service announcements that can be submitted to local newspapers; some chapters are organizing groups to deck themselves in “JDRF blue” and join the audiences of local television news shows; the Empire State Building in New York City will be lit up in blue on World Diabetes Day; and on T1Day, JDRF will be posting a continual stream of updates via its Facebook page and Tweeting every one minute past the hour, every hour. This is just a sample of the plans we’re putting into action. For the inside scoop on these and other exciting events, visit JDRF’s Facebook page and follow us on Twitter, now through the month of November. This year, there’s an especially meaningful way to get involved—as an advocate. JDRF’s most important advocacy goal this year is convincing Congress to renew the Special Diabetes Program (SDP). Established in 1997, the SDP has s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Ribbon Claimed The Color Blue

Diabetes Awareness Ribbon Claimed The Color Blue

Pink is for breast cancer, red is for heart disease, purple for pancreatic cancer, and now, blue is for diabetes. I am glad diabetes is going to have a colored ribbon. If the ribbon can do for diabetes awareness what pink has done for breast cancer, it will be a good thing. At any rate, here is some information from the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) as we begin November – Diabetes Awareness month: New figures recently launched by the International Diabetes Federation indicate that the number of people living with diabetes has risen to 366 million. Diabetes is responsible for 4.6 million deaths a year – 1 every 7 seconds. Healthcare spending on diabetes has reached USD 465 billion. Diabetes is among the top 10 causes of disability, resulting in devastating complications such as blindness and lower limb amputations. All nations—rich and poor—are suffering the impact of the diabetes epidemic Diabetes is undermining global development. Diabetes hits the poorest hardest The IDF wants us to GO BLUE FOR DIABETES! Here are some of their suggestions: Organize a Flash Mob: Abu Dhabi, Colombo, and Tel Aviv are the latest cities to join the World Diabetes Day Flash Mob Challenge. Visit our website to find out what it’s all about and watch our tutorial video for tips on what you can perform to promote the diabetes cause in your area. Shine a blue light for diabetes: Cyprus, Finland, and Lebanon are the latest countries to confirm their participation in this year’s Blue Monument Challenge. See the complete list of participating monuments and keep on sending your confirmations to [email protected] If you have a building that’s already going blue, take a picture and add it to our Flicker pool. Take the Big Blue Test: Help get life-saving supplies to people with diabe Continue reading >>

Blue-yellow Vision Deficits In Patients With Diabetes

Blue-yellow Vision Deficits In Patients With Diabetes

Blue-Yellow Vision Deficits in Patients With Diabetes Division of Diabetes, Department of Health Sciences, Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center, Downey, California Department of Medicine, University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Home blood glucose monitoring has been introduced as a means to achieve good control in patients with diabetes mellitus. Many patients use color-reagent strips and color comparisons to determine blood glucose levels. Intact color vision in the blue-yellow range is necessary for accurately interpreting these strips. Blue-yellow vision deficits occur as a consequence of eye disease and are not genetic or sex-linked. We evaluated blue-yellow vision acuity in 70 diabetic patients and in 19 age-matched control subjects. The patients with diabetes were subdivided according to their degree of retinopathy as follows: no disease (N = 14), nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (N = 16), proliferative diabetic retinopathy (N = 14) and postlaser-treated (N = 26). None of the control group had deficits. Each group of diabetic patients had a statistically significant increase in color vision deficits compared with the controls. In the laser-treated group, deficits occurred in most patients, were more severe and were significantly increased over all other diabetic subgroups. These deficits may impair visual interpretation of home blood glucose monitoring strips. Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (754K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected References . These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of referenc Continue reading >>

Is Blue The Official Color Of Diabetes?

Is Blue The Official Color Of Diabetes?

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. I'm going to paint my fingernails that color this month. I know people will think I'm a freak and ask. Then I get to tell them hiw much we need a cure! I could be wrong, but from the way I understand it, World Diabetes Day is Blue, but I Juvenile Diabetes/T1 is the gray ribbon. So I guess, blue is for ALL diabetics, grey for T1. I could be way off. Don't hold me to this. *haha* Hmmm....and I heard some group was trying to do orange. It's so confusing! We need a color.....like pink is for breast cancer. I think world diabetes day is blue, the awareness ribbon is grey-it better be cause that is what is tattooed on me lol. I think world diabetes day is blue, the awareness ribbon is grey-it better be cause that is what is tattooed on me lol. no kidding... that tat of mine isnt gonna change Gray is such a yucky color for an awareness color..I mean, I know T1 is horrible in itself, but gee whiz, you would think they (whoever "they" are) could have come up with a better color for awareness. After all, Breast Cancer is horrific, but the awareness color for it is a cheerful pink. The Awareness Ribbon is a Silver Grey, WDD is a blue circle, have no idea why, maybe for Type 2? The circle occurs frequently in nature and has thus been widely employed since the dawn of humankind. The significance is overwhelmingly positive. Across cultures, the circle can symbolize life and health. Most significantly for the campaign, the circle symbolizes unity. Our combined strength is the key element that made this campaign so special. The global diabetes community came together to support a United Nations Resolution on diabetes and needs to remain united to make a difference. As we all kno Continue reading >>

Color Me Healthy

Color Me Healthy

When was the last time you gave some thought to color? Maybe it was when you were trying to choose paint for, say, your living room. Or maybe you were trying to decide if that pink blouse goes with that orange skirt. Most of us are drawn to certain colors. Some people prefer bright, sunny colors, like yellow, while others find calm and comfort in forest greens or browns. There’s more to color than just decorating or assembling an outfit, however. The choice of color can affect your health and your mood. Color and mood Linking certain colors to aspects of health and healing is nothing new. The ancient Egyptians practiced “chromotherapy,” or the use of colors to help heal, and some alternative medicine practitioners still use this technique today. For example, the color red was thought to stimulate the mind and increase circulation. Orange was used to heal the lungs and provide energy. And blue was used to soothe, calm, and treat pain. While there isn’t a lot of research to support these beliefs, it IS known that color can affect your mood and your mindset. Here are some examples: Red. Associated with love, warmth and, excitement (think of a fire engine rushing down the street). It’s also linked with feelings of anger. Blue. Associated with calmness, peace, and serenity. Blue is also linked with sadness. People are supposedly more productive when working in a room that’s painted blue. Yellow. Associated with warmth and cheeriness (like the sun). But yellow can also evoke feelings of frustration and anger, and it can be tiring on the eyes. Pink. Associated with love and romance. Pink can initially create a sense of calm but may eventually lead to agitation. Black. Long associated with death and mourning. Black is also a symbol of power and, sometimes, evil. Whi Continue reading >>

What Is The Ribbon Color For Diabetes Awareness?

What Is The Ribbon Color For Diabetes Awareness?

Health Conditions & Diseases Awareness ribbons consist of short ribbon pieces folded into a loop as a way to represent or support different issues, diseases and causes by making a statement, claims Disabled World. They are widely used in the United States of America, Canada, U.K., Australia and several other parts of the world. One of the most well-known awareness ribbon colors is pink in support of breast cancer. Learn more about Conditions & Diseases Continue reading >>

Why The Blue Circle?

Why The Blue Circle?

I can't quite remember who asked me, but in front of San Francisco City Hall last Friday evening, during our World Diabetes Day celebrations, somebody pointed to my pin and asked, "Why the blue circle, anyway? What does that mean?" They also wanted to know why the logo didn't have the world "diabetes" stamped across it: "Who's going to recognize that this stands for diabetes?!" For goodness' sake, it's supposed to be like the ubiquitous pink ribbon for breast cancer, red ribbon for AIDS, or yellow ribbon for bring-home-the-troops. Setting the issue of why it's blue and a circle aside for a moment, can't we all agree that a symbol that speaks for itself is better than having to pin the word "DIABETES" on your lapel? I was especially surprised to discover that folks from the local chapter of the ADA (American Diabetes Association) weren't at all familiar with the blue circle campaign. I sort of forgave them for it last year, since it was still very new then, but now I'm thinking that that group — and this country at large, which doesn't play up World Diabetes Day a fraction as much as the rest of the world — may be suffering from some classic "not invented here syndrome." When you go to the ADA's website right now, for example, you see "American Diabetes Month," but nada on WDD. I hereby proclaim this Call to Action for next year's WDD: Let's do it up, right, America! And that means you, ADA! And that means you, Mainstream Media! This awareness campaign is gaining traction, with the likes of T1 rockstar Nick Jonas on board, but it seems like we have a long way to go to catch up with the Brits, the Germans, or the Australians, for example. And now for the Why Blue? And Why a Circle? I know from my previous research that this symbol was the brainchild of Kari Rosenfeld Continue reading >>

4 Awesome Questions About Diabetes Awareness Month 2016

4 Awesome Questions About Diabetes Awareness Month 2016

1. Are You Aware OfDiabetes Awareness Month? Each year when November rolls around, people begin thinking about the common disease that affects around 29.1 million people in the United States alone. Diabetes affects people of all ages and causes many health concerns in the body. It is crucial people are aware of this disease and their risk factors towards getting it. This is why diabetes awareness month is so important for raising awareness of this disease and helping people understand how it can be treated. Understanding more about this special month and its symbolism will give people the knowledge they need to be protective of their health and monitor it. 2. Why Is Diabetes Honored With Its Own Month? While diabetes month was first named in 1975, it was not until a few years later this special day and month were officially proclaimed by the president and congress. Each year, on November 14, World Diabetes Day is celebrated around the world. On this day, special events are held to honor Dr. Frederick Banting, one of the discoverers of insulin. Because of his research, diabetic patients are able to safely control their disease and prevent damage to their body and the loss of their life. World Diabetes Day was officially launched in 1991 by the International Diabetes Federation, in the hopes light would be shared on this disease so people could better understand it. The first few years of the celebration day were not as widespread as they are today. With the founding of the Diabetes Online Community, people have been able to work together, from all over the country, to coordinate special events to honor this day. 3. What Events are Planned For This November? The Theme of 2016s World Diabetes Day will be Eyes on Diabetes. The full focus of this special event will be to in Continue reading >>

The Blue Circle – A Powerful Symbol For World Diabetes Day

The Blue Circle – A Powerful Symbol For World Diabetes Day

During the last month, you have probably seen more than one pink ribbon. Every October, breast cancer awareness month, we see the pink ribbon displayed on everything from shirts to mugs to even stamps. Most people in the U.S., even many young children, are familiar with the pink ribbon and that it stands for breast cancer awareness. For the last 20 years, the pink ribbon has helped to increase awareness and funding for a very worthy cause. The sea of pink that takes over October is not only a reminder of how many people breast cancer has affected, but also how many people stand against it. It sends a powerful message that we as a community are standing up to a deadly NCD. The pink ribbon has taught us an important lesson – a simple message can have a large impact on community awareness. This lesson can be used to combat another NCD – diabetes. Diabetes also has a symbol to raise awareness, the blue circle. The blue circle has only been in existence since 2006, when the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), chose it because in many cultures a circle can symbolize life and health. And, more importantly, the circle symbolizes the unity that is necessary to combat such a deadly NCD. IDF chose the color blue for the color of the sky and the flag of the United Nations, an organization that stands for unity among many nations. World Diabetes Day (WDD) is on November 14th, almost a week away. Diabetes education and prevention is the WDD theme for the time period from 2009 – 2013. Awareness efforts include the WDD Blue Monument Challenge. On November 14th, 2010, over 900 monuments and buildings were lit blue to raise awareness for diabetes. This popular campaign will continue this year. If you would like to learn more about this initiative or to find out how to go about Continue reading >>

Awareness Ribbons Chart: Color And Meaning Of Awareness Ribbon Causes

Awareness Ribbons Chart: Color And Meaning Of Awareness Ribbon Causes

A - A + Main Document Quote: "Because many awareness ribbon colors may have multiple associated meanings, Disabled World is listing only awareness ribbons regarding health and disability meanings and causes." The use of various colored ribbons is designed to create public awareness to health, medical conditions, disability, and other issues. An awareness ribbon is defined as a piece of colored ribbon folded across itself creating a loop shape - or a representation of such. Today, the meaning of colored awareness ribbons are used globally as a way for wearers of the ribbon(s) to make a statement of support for a particular cause or issue. Probably the two most well-known awareness ribbons are; the red ribbon in support of those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); and the pink ribbon which denotes breast cancer awareness. The meaning behind the awareness ribbon depends on its color(s). Many different groups, foundations and organizations have adopted these ribbons as symbols of support or awareness - as a result, various causes may often share the same, or similar, ribbon color(s). How many awareness ribbons are there? This is a question we get asked quite often. With new awareness campaign days, weeks, and months - as well as new ribbon colors, constantly being created, we are not sure how many awareness ribbon colors there currently are - but there certainly seems to be a lot! We currently have over 80 different ribbon colors and designs listed below. Awareness Ribbon Color Meanings Jump to Ribbon Color: 9/11 - This ribbon is a sign of mourning for those lost in the September 11th (9/11) attack. Mourning and remembrance of the Virginia Tech massacre Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (Now known as Primary Biliary Cholangitis) Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS Continue reading >>

Eating Colorful Food Has Health Benefits

Eating Colorful Food Has Health Benefits

By Tracey Neithercott/Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN There's no question that eating three to five servings of fruits and vegetables daily will improve your health. But more and more experts are saying healthy eating is not only about how many servings you eat. It's about the variety you pick, too. Eat a diet of solely white foods, and you'll miss key nutrients your body needseven if your palette includes cauliflower, onions, and mushrooms. Adding a multivitamin doesn't cut it either. "People will say, 'I'm taking a multivitamin, so I don't really need to eat these,' " says Karin Hosenfeld, RD, LD, a dietitian in private practice in Dallas, but she says scientists don't know whether whole foods may offer undiscovered benefits that vitamins don't. "We do know for sure that if you don't eat your fruits and vegetables, you're not getting your fiber, and that's [helping keep] your blood sugar down." Every one of your meals doesn't have to be multicolored (though it wouldn't hurt to add a salad with different-colored veggies to the menu), but you should get a range of fruits and vegetables in varying hues over the course of a week. "We know that the most vibrantly colored fruits and vegetables have the most nutrition," says Hosenfeld. "Eating an array of colors just ensures that you get the benefits of all of them." Below, find out how foods in each color category can keep you healthy, now and in the future. As with all things, though, mind your diabetes. "First and foremost from the diabetes side," says Hosenfeld, "you want to make sure you're not going over your blood sugar limits, especially with starchy vegetables and fruit." Pigments called anthocyanins give red and purple fruits and vegetables their color and serve as powerful antioxidants in the body. "They're known f Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

We all know November is Diabetes awareness month, and November 14th is “World Diabetes Day.” But what is the meaning of the “blue circle” and why do we celebrate and advocate for diabetes so much this month? I asked Keegan Hall, the President of the Young Leaders in Diabetes Program, to talk a bit about the history. Many causes and conditions have a colored ribbon to symbolize the cause. In the diabetes community, we have done something very different—a blue circle. The blue circle is the universal symbol for diabetes. Until 2006, there was no global symbol for diabetes. The purpose of the symbol is to give diabetes a common identity. It aims to: Support all existing efforts to raise awareness about diabetes Inspire new activities, bring diabetes to the attention of the general public Brand diabetes Provide a means to show support for the fight against diabetes What is the history of the blue circle? The icon was originally developed for the campaign that resulted in the passage of United Nations Resolution 61/225 “World Diabetes Day.” The campaign for a United Nations Resolution on diabetes was a response to the diabetes pandemic that is set to overwhelm healthcare resources everywhere. The campaign mobilized diabetes stakeholders behind the common cause of securing a United Nations Resolution on diabetes. The United Nations passed Resolution 61/225 ‘World Diabetes Day’ on December 20, 2006. Why a circle? The circle occurs frequently in nature and has thus been widely employed since the dawn of humankind. The significance is overwhelmingly positive. Across cultures, the circle can symbolize life and health. Most significantly for the campaign, the circle symbolizes unity. Our combined strength is the key element that made this campaign so special. The Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Month

American Diabetes Month

National Diabetes Month is observed every November so individuals, health care professionals, organizations, and communities across the country can bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it is not controlled. One in 11 Americans has diabetes, more than 29 million people. Another 86 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The awareness color for Diabetes is gray, and blue and gray. Gray stands for Diabetes, in general, and blue and gray stand for Type 1 Diabetes. Personalized Cause supports National Diabetes Month with a diabetes gray awareness ribbon, diabetes gray personalized awareness ribbon pin, diabetes gray fabric awareness ribbons and diabetes gray awareness bracelets. Personalized Cause supports National Diabetes Month with a diabetes blue and gray awareness ribbon and a diabetes blue and gray personalized awareness pin. American Diabetes Month Sponsor: American Diabetes Association To learn more, visit Continue reading >>

Ok, I’m Confused…the Symbol For Diabetes Awareness Is…what?

Ok, I’m Confused…the Symbol For Diabetes Awareness Is…what?

If you were to do a series of online searches on Diabetes Awareness symbols, chances are that you’d encounter just what we have: confusion. There truly are several symbols out there that represent diabetes awareness. Some are more popular than others, however, and that’s what we’re hoping to do with this brief list: to show you three of the most commonly identified symbols so that you too can join in the fight against diabetes. 1. A grey ribbon with a drop of red The drop of red is meant to symbolize the blood used to test blood sugar. In general, this ribbon tends to be the most popular of the three within the United States, as it has been around the longest. ★ TYPE 1 HAS THEIR OWN RIBBON? ★ Type 1 diabetes actually does have its own awareness ribbon. One half of the ribbon is blue, and the other is grey, which also has a drop of red. *** What’s our favorite way to show to demonstrate our diabetes awareness? We really like to: Sock It to Diabetes! Sometimes we’ll wear one blue sock with one grey sock. Or one orange, and one blue. Well, you get the picture. You can help us Sock It To Diabetes. 2. A blue circle As an attempt to unify the fight against diabetes, the United Nations (UN) introduced the blue circle in 2006. Blue, according to diabetesbluecircle.org, “…reflects the color of the sky and the flag of the United Nations,” while the circle is meant to symbolize unity. ★ Help a Patient with Leg & Foot Ulcers ★ Sometimes insurance isn’t enough when the only medication that gives you hope costs more than insurance will provide. This requires thousands of dollars in co-pays or other out-of-pocket costs. Hundreds of patients, many whom are diabetic, who are being treated are choosing between their health and their family’s financial liveliho Continue reading >>

More in diabetes