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What Chinese Food Is Good For Diabetics

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

How to keep your blood sugar in check when dining out. By the dLife Editors Going out to eat is fraught with challenges for people who need to watch their blood sugar. There’s the giant portion size issue, the unknown ingredients, and the “special-occasion effect.” That’s the way we tell ourselves it’s ok to make unhealthy choices on special occasions. Our idea of what constitutes a special occasion is pretty subjective. Here are some tips on making d-friendly choices in restaurants, by type of cuisine. What to Order at Italian Restaurants Italian restaurants can be full of high-carbohydrate foods like bread, pasta, pizza, risotto, and gnocci. Many of these combine refined carbs with processed meats like sausage and pepperoni, and batters or breading (think eggplant Parmesan or fried mozzarella). Things you can do: Ask your server to skip the bread basket for your table. If you’re going to splurge and have pasta, ask for it as a side dish and don’t eat more than the size of your fist. That’s one cup of pasta, or about 45 grams of carbohydrate. Order unbreaded chicken or veal baked with sauces like piccata, marsala, puttanesca, francese, or cacciatore. Other good choices include: Caesar salad with grilled or baked fish, escarole and beans, and minestrone soup. What to Order at Mexican Restaurants Mexican food can be full of carbohydrates with large portions of rice, beans, and tortillas. Things you can do: At the very least, limit portion sizes. Ask to have half your plate wrapped to go before you even start eating. Skip the rice; ask for black beans or salad in its place. If you love chips and salsa, take a handful and then ask for the basket to be removed from the table. Order soft chicken or fish tacos and eat the fillings with a fork, skipping the tor Continue reading >>

Eating Well With Diabetes: East Asian Diets

Eating Well With Diabetes: East Asian Diets

Eating well with Diabetes: East Asian diets Many staple foods in the East Asian diet are good for your health. From fresh soybeans to leafy green vegetables to mandarin oranges, there are lots of nutrient-rich choices. However, refined grains and salty foods are also common and should be limited. If you have diabetes, you can work with your healthcare team to develop a plan thats right for you. It will probably include exercise, a meal plan, blood glucose monitoring, and perhaps medication. This article will focus on the dietary changes that you can make. Diabetes information in Chinese! Call EatRight Ontario at 1-877-510-510-2 to get practical tips and information on manageing diabetes in Chinese. This information will tell you which of your favourite traditional foods fit into a healthy diet and which should be limited to help you manage diabetes. Diabetes is a disease where the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. When the body is working well, insulin helps carry sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells where it is used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body's cells do not receive enough glucose, so it stays in your blood. High blood glucose (or high blood sugar) can lead to heart, kidney, vision and blood vessel problems. Some ethnic groups in Canada have a higher risk of getting diabetes, including people of Asian descent. There are certain genes that affect insulin function. Having these genes increases your risk of diabetes. These genes are commonly found in high risk populations such as people with an Asian heritage. If you have diabetes, it is important to eat every 4 to 6 hours to keep your blood sugar levels stable. Try to have three daily meals at regular times Continue reading >>

Eating Out

Eating Out

Having diabetes doesn’t deprive you of eating out. If you eat out regularly, you will need to pay close attention to food choices and serving sizes to manage your weight and diabetes. Don’t limit your enjoyment by thinking you need to go to a special restaurant or eat special meals just because you have diabetes. You’ll soon discover that many restaurants serve foods that are suitable for healthy eating. Most will also value your patronage and are more than happy to help if you can’t find something suitable on the menu. Ask restaurant staff about the dish of your choice and the way it’s been cooked, and request simple changes if required. Try to choose meals that: Are lower in fat and particularly low in saturated fat Contain breads, cereals (preferably wholegrain), vegetables (including legumes) and/or fruits Do not have a large amount of sugar added. Insulin & Eating Out When eating out there a few things you need to consider. Your meal may be served later than usual, so to avoid a ‘hypo’, take your insulin with you and give your injection as the meal arrives. Be sure to choose a meal with enough carbohydrate. Ask for extra bread, rice, potato, fruit or fruit juice if you need more. If you are having a bigger meal with more carbohydrate than usual, you may need to increase your insulin dose prior to the meal on that special occasion. Discuss this with your doctor, dietitian or Credentialled Diabetes Educator first. What to Drink When you arrive ask for a jug of iced water before ordering other drinks. Throughout the meal drink: Water: plain, mineral or soda Low joule/calorie soft drinks Coffee, tea, herbal tea. Don’t drink fruit juice (unless you need additional carbohydrates). If you want to drink alcohol limit it to: 2 standard drinks a day for men 1 Continue reading >>

Can Someone Let Me Know What Chinese Food I Can Eat

Can Someone Let Me Know What Chinese Food I Can Eat

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can someone let me know what Chinese Food I can eat I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes around 4 years ago, I believe I probably had it a lot longer. Aside from being told to watch what I ate, and attending the surgery for an annual review, I just carried on eating and doing everything the same. However, this time I was told that my diabetes is registering "57", following a blood test. Haven't a clue what this means, except that it is apparently getting worse and I may have to take medication 3 times a day. I was told I had to exercise more and change my diet. I asked about the food I could eat, Indian, Italian, Chinese - especially Chinese, but was told to stick to salads, with fish or meat. I could eat a small amount of rice or pasta, but to leave off potatoes. Sorry, but I cannot live like that. So would appreciate any and all advice as to what I can eat, as my wife loves cooking and I love eating and whilst I don't have a problem in adjusting what I eat, I do not want to give up all my pleasures, including the occasional pint or glass of wine. I will tag @daisy1 for you. She will send you some information for newcomers. Many forum members have an occasional pint or glass of wine. I chose not to but that is my personal choice. I would rather eat a small amount of potatoes once in a while than a glass of wine. Basically you have to cut down on the amount of carbohydrates you eat to bring your blood sugar down. Chinese food that has meat or fish and vegetables but in a savory rather than sweet sauce would be best if you are going to eat Chinese food.I would skip the rice for now. It is important to control your blood sugar so that you can live and l Continue reading >>

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

CONTRAVE® (naltrexone HCI/bupropion HCl) is a prescription weight-loss medicine that may help adults with obesity (BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2), or who are overweight (BMI greater than or equal to 27 kg/m2) with at least one weight-related medical condition, lose weight and keep the weight off. CONTRAVE should be used along with diet and exercise. One of the ingredients in CONTRAVE, bupropion, may increase the risk of suicidal thinking in children, adolescents, and young adults. CONTRAVE patients should be monitored for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In patients taking bupropion for smoking cessation, serious neuropsychiatric adverse events have been reported. CONTRAVE is not approved for use in children under the age of 18. Stop taking CONTRAVE and call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you: thoughts about suicide or dying; attempts to commit suicide; depression; anxiety; feeling agitated or restless; panic attacks; trouble sleeping (insomnia); irritability; aggression, anger, or violence; acting on dangerous impulses; an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania); other unusual changes in behavior or mood. Do not take CONTRAVE if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure; have or have had seizures; use other medicines that contain bupropion such as WELLBUTRIN, APLENZIN or ZYBAN; have or have had an eating disorder; are dependent on opioid pain medicines or use medicines to help stop taking opioids such as methadone or buprenorphine, or are in opiate withdrawal; drink a lot of alcohol and abruptly stop drinking; are allergic to any of the ingredients in CONTRAVE; or are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Before taking CONTRAVE, tell your healthcare provider ab Continue reading >>

Diabetic Food Choices At Chinese Restaurants

Diabetic Food Choices At Chinese Restaurants

The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse reports that about 23.6 million Americans have diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body has difficulty processing carbohydrates from your diet, and your blood sugar levels are high. Many typical menu items at Chinese restaurants are unhealthy for individuals with diabetes, but some choices can be part of a healthy diet to control blood sugar levels. Study the menu and order nutritious items that can fit into your carbohydrate-controlled, healthy diet. Video of the Day Limit your consumption of high-carbohydrate Chinese restaurant foods such as fried rice, steamed rice, chow mein, lo mein and other noodle dishes. The American Diabetes Association suggests that most individuals with diabetes should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal to help prevent surges in blood sugar levels. A cup of rice or noodles has 44 to 50 grams of carbohydrates. Vegetables, chicken, fish and tofu are low-carbohydrate options. Increase Fiber Consumption Order high-fiber menu items to help control your blood sugar levels. Individuals with diabetes who consume more high-fiber foods, such as whole grains, fruits, legumes and vegetables tend to have better blood sugar control, according to a study published in the January-February 2011 edition of the journal “Endocrine Practice." Ask for extra vegetables in each dish, order brown instead of white rice and eat orange slices instead of sweets to increase your fiber intake. You are at risk for developing heart disease if you have diabetes, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. A healthy diet can help you lower your cholesterol levels and reduce your heart disease risk. Fried foods, such as egg rolls, fried rice, General Tsao’s chicken and fried noodle dishes, are Continue reading >>

Chinese Food... - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Chinese Food... - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I LOVE chinese food and have not ate any since I was dx'd last week, does anyone here have a problem with there BG after eating Chinese food? I love the eggrolls, fried rice, beef and broccoli and all kinds of chinese food actually I have heard it's not that bad for you as a diabetic but I don't really know the truth to that...any stories would help! Those eggrolls and fried rice are loaded with starchy carbs (and fat). And many of the sauces used in Chinese restaurants include cornstarch as a thickening agent, rendering innocent veggies like broccoli more carb-laden than your system might like. That said, just as with Mexican food you can find items that are tasty and satisfying; You just need to be selective, test to see what works for you, and really be aware of portion control. Perhaps you should pick up a book or two about low glycemic index carbohydrates. Also, get the Calorie King guide (available in most book stores and on the web) and use it to determine the carb content of the foods you eat. It will be an eye opener for sure! As you are newly diagnosed, I would recommend that you spend a few weeks eating at home where you can control your portions and macronutrients. Get used to carb counting and portion control. Once you've done this, and tested to see what foods work for you, restaurant eating will be much easier. This is probably not what you want to hear, but it might make the whole thing more managable. Knowledge is power! I avoid rice, but find that a small portion of egg noodles work. I tend to steer clear of sauces such as "Sweet Chilli, Sweet and Sour, and BBQ". Salt and ch Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes

Living With Diabetes

News you can use about diabetes Living with diabetes is about so much more than well, diabetes. It's about the ups, like small daily accomplishments and achieving your goals, and the downs. It can be complicated, but it may help to keep in mind that you can find inspiration, information, and motivation here. In these featured articles, you'll discover ideas to take the pressure off and help you deal with everything from making travel easier to making dining out more enjoyable. Since stress can really take its toll on your blood sugar, you can read how to tackle that, too. More articles are added each month. So browse them all, get inspired, and check back in with us often. If you'd like, you can sign up for more TeamingUp to get regular updates. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Guide To Chinese Food

Diabetic Guide To Chinese Food

How can you stay healthy and still enjoy Chinese food? You can do it by planning ahead, choosing wisely and watching how much you eat. Choose traditional food dishes that are high in fiber, vitamins and minerals, and low in fat. Great choices are beans, peas, tofu, bean sprouts and dark green vegetables such as Chinese broccoli, choy sum, watercress, Chinese chives, Chinese yard-long beans and amaranth also known as Chinese spinach. Other Chinese vegetables that are rich in iron are Chinese mushroom, seaweed and black fungus. Go for the mung beans (green gram beans), yellow bean and black bean dishes for soup or desserts with artificial sweetener. Sweet potatoes are also high in fiber and very nutritious which can be boiled or made into dessert with taro and tapioca using artificial sweetener. Whole wheat and rye bread and cornbread are good sources of fiber and are good for everyone. Watch out for dishes loaded with lard such as moon cakes. Also watch out foods that are loaded with fat and cholesterol such as Chinese sausages that are made with pork loin or pork or duck liver and roasted pigs or pork or ducks. Lastly, watch out for foods that are high in salt such as salty duck eggs and salty fish. For some people who like dim sum, choose steamed dumplings instead of fried dumplings and should limit to 5-6 servings for brunch. Choose fresh vegetables that are steamed or stir-fried with light vegetable oil or simmer into soup. Vegetables and grains should fill up most of your plate, but leave room for some lean meat, poultry or fish. Be sure to choose stir-fired chicken with dark green vegetables and remove the skin instead of the fried variety. For something different, try steamed fish with garlic and scallion in light vegetable oil and salt. What's for dessert? It's h Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Lo Mein?

Can Diabetics Eat Lo Mein?

Lo mein is a Chinese noodle dish that often contains sauce, vegetables and a source of protein, such as chicken or tofu. If you have diabetes, the high carbohydrate content of this dish may make you hesitate to order it from Chinese restaurants, but it can occasionally fit into a healthy diet. Eat it in moderation and with healthy modifications to minimize the impact on your blood sugar levels. Diabetes is a condition of high blood sugar levels that can result when your body doesn't metabolize carbohydrates properly. Consuming a moderate amount, such as 45 to 60 grams, of carbohydrates at each meal can help you control your blood sugar levels, according to the American Diabetes Association. One cup of vegetable lo mein contains 27 grams of carbohydrates, so assuming they eat no more than 2 cups in one sitting, diabetics can eat lo mein. But restaurant portions are often much larger than this. Diabetics should refrain from having large portions of steamed or fried rice at the same meal, since a cup of rice contains 44 grams of carbohydrates. Calories in Lo Mein Achieving and maintaining a healthy weight aids in blood sugar control. Consuming more calories than you expend causes weight gain, and a typical restaurant serving of lo mein contains 897 calories. Lo mein can fit more easily into a diet for controlling your weight and lowering blood sugar if you serve yourself a smaller portion. A cup of lo mein contains 165 calories. If eating a single serving of lo mein leaves you feeling hungry, order an extra serving of steamed nonstarchy vegetables, which are low in carbs and calories. Fiber and Protein Dietary fiber can help lower blood sugar levels, and lo mein is healthier if you make it with whole-grain noodles or thin whole-wheat spaghetti instead of refined chow mein Continue reading >>

Asian-inspired Recipes

Asian-inspired Recipes

Enjoy your favorite Asian dishes, from Thai to Chinese to Vietnamese to Japanese, without needing a passport. Enjoy your favorite Asian dishes, from Thai to Chinese to Vietnamese to Japanese, without needing a passport. Enjoy your favorite Asian dishes, from Thai to Chinese to Vietnamese to Japanese, without needing a passport. Enjoy your favorite Asian dishes, from Thai to Chinese to Vietnamese to Japanese, without needing a passport. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Foods From Around The World

Diabetes-friendly Foods From Around The World

Thinkstock Global cuisines offer a new way to prepare diabetes-friendly meals if you know what to eat and what to avoid. For example, some of the spices in ethnic foods, such as turmeric, might help improve the health of people with type 2 diabetes. Turmeric appears to have anti-inflammatory properties via a substance called curcumin that may counter metabolic diseases, including diabetes, according to research in the September 2015 issue of the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology. Whether eating a favorite family dish or trying a new cuisine, you can apply the same nutrition strategies you learn from a diabetes educator or dietitian to all your meals — and doing so could lead to a 1 to 2 point drop in HbA1c, according to a review of data published in February 2014 in the Journal of Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, and Obesity. “Make half of your plate vegetables, one-quarter of your plate lean meat, and one-quarter a whole-grain or high-fiber carbohydrate,” says Shannon Weston, MPH, RD, a certified diabetes educator at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston. Here’s how to find diabetes-friendly choices for some popular cuisines: Italian Food Italian options include salads, lean meats, and a variety of vegetables, Weston says. Watch out for heavy cream-based sauces, cheeses, oils, deep-dish or thick-crust pizza, breaded meats, and pasta dishes “stuffed with high-fat meats and cheeses,” she says. If you’re cooking at home or asking for changes to a restaurant meal, try these strategies: Use grated cauliflower as a crust instead of a flour crust to make a pizza and layer on the vegetables and lean meats. Use spaghetti squash or zucchini “noodles” cut with a spiralizer or a peeler in place of pasta. Choose homemade marinara instead of Alf Continue reading >>

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants Yes, you can eat outpretty much anywhere! Here's how to make smart choices. When you have diabetes, eating out can seem more complicated than deciphering the new tax code. But it doesnt have to be. People with diabetes can enjoy most any kind of restaurant, says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week . The key is to stick as closely to your usual meal plan as possible. Heres how. (Find out how to stop the craving cycle before it starts and burn fat around the clock with the naturally sweet, salty, and satisfying meals in Eat Clean, Lose Weight & Love Every Bite .) Worried about all that crust? Go with one slice of thin crust pizza and youll lighten the carb count of your slice by a third compared to a regular slice. If a single slice sounds too skimpy, pump up the volumeand the fiber by adding plenty of chopped veggies. And speaking of veggies, filling up on a salad before your pie arrives can also put the breaks on hunger. These pita pizzas will totally change the way you think about dinner: Given that pasta is packed with carbohydrates, its probably not the best idea to make it the center of your meal, says Weisenberger. Just one order of spaghetti and meatballs can easily pack 150 grams of carbs. That doesnt mean you have to go 100% pasta-free though. Weisenberger recommends ordering pasta as a side dish and limiting your portion to a half-cup, or about the size of a tennis ball. Pair it with an order of mussels fra diavolo, chicken cacciatore, or grilled calamari. (And make sure you try these 6 ways to make Italian food flat belly-friendly! ) If youre eating Chinese food, chances are theres going to be rice on your plate. And if that rice is white, be prep Continue reading >>

28 Popular Restaurant Dishes That Are Great For Diabetics

28 Popular Restaurant Dishes That Are Great For Diabetics

Dining out with diabetes Contrary to popular belief, a diabetes diagnosis doesn't mean you have to spend your days eating flavorless fare. It's completely possible to enjoy delicious food—even at a restaurant, as long as you know exactly what to order, how it's prepared, and what an appropriately sized portion looks like. Since not everyone with diabetes has the same meal plan or health goals, we set out to create the most comprehensive list of diabetes-friendly restaurant dishes, whether you're cutting calories or keeping salt, carbs, or fats to a minimum. Read on for nutritionist-approved orders from Chinese and Italian restaurants, delis, smoothie shops, and other popular eateries. Plus, don't forget to be on the lookout for these menu words to avoid. At American restaurants: Turkey burger with steamed broccoli When you're dining at your local sports bar or diner, Isabel Smith, MS, RD, CDN, says that a turkey burger is the way to go. "Remove the top bun, which doesn't typically contain much fiber and swap fries for a green veggie. This will add fiber to your meal and help slow blood sugar spikes and promote satiety," she explains. Here's how to get more fiber in your diet. At American restaurants: Beef burger with a salad If you prefer a beef burger, Smith suggests pairing one with a salad (sorry, no fries) and a vinegar-based dressing on the side. Ditch the top bun to keep empty carbs off your plate and say "no thanks" to cheese to keep excess salt and fat to a minimum. At American restaurants: Filet mignon Feeling fancy? Order a filet with a sweet potato and side of non-starchy vegetables such as spinach or broccoli, suggests Miriam Jacobson, RD, CDN. "Sometimes a steak can be the healthiest item on the menu. Just beware of portion sizes. It should be the size of Continue reading >>

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants​

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants​

When you have diabetes, eating out can seem more complicated than deciphering the new tax code. But it doesn’t have to be. “People with diabetes can enjoy most any kind of restaurant,” says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week. “The key is to stick as closely to your usual meal plan as possible.” Here’s how. (Find out how to stop the craving cycle before it starts and burn fat around the clock with the naturally sweet, salty, and satisfying meals in Eat Clean, Lose Weight & Love Every Bite.) Worried about all that crust? Go with one slice of thin crust pizza and you’ll lighten the carb count of your slice by a third compared to a regular slice. If a single slice sounds too skimpy, pump up the volume—and the fiber—by adding plenty of chopped veggies. And speaking of veggies, filling up on a salad before your pie arrives can also put the breaks on hunger. These pita pizzas will totally change the way you think about dinner: “Given that pasta is packed with carbohydrates, it’s probably not the best idea to make it the center of your meal,” says Weisenberger. Just one order of spaghetti and meatballs can easily pack 150 grams of carbs. That doesn’t mean you have to go 100% pasta-free though. Weisenberger recommends ordering pasta as a side dish and limiting your portion to a half-cup, or about the size of a tennis ball. Pair it with an order of mussels fra diavolo, chicken cacciatore, or grilled calamari. (And make sure you try these 6 ways to make Italian food flat belly-friendly!) We hope you enjoy the products we're recommending as much as we do! Just so you know, Prevention may get a share of sales from the links on this page. If you’re eating Chinese food, chances are there’s going to be rice on your pla Continue reading >>

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