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What Causes Leg Swelling In Diabetics?

Seven Tips For Dealing With Diabetes-related Fluid Retention

Seven Tips For Dealing With Diabetes-related Fluid Retention

Fluid retention, also known as edema, is a problem that affects many diabetics, especially those with type 2 diabetes. Water retention can occur in any part of the legs, including the feet, ankles, calves and thighs. There are several reasons why edema occurs, such as fluid buildup or from inflammation in injured or diseased tissue and joints. Types of Edema There are three types of diabetes-related fluid retention: The first type is called macular edema. Macular edema is a swelling that occurs in the macular, which is near the center of the retina. The retina is responsible for a number of duties such as the ability to read, daytime vision and color reception. Macular edema can cause diabetic retinopathy, which starts with the leaking of fluid from blood vessels into the macula. If not treated, this condition can blind a person. Pulmonary edema is the second type of fluid retention, which occurs if someone is using certain diabetic medications and if the person has cardiovascular problems. This type of edema can be treated inserting a catheter that drains the fluids. Foot and leg edema is the third type of edema and is also the most commonly discussed. Edema in the legs and feet can cause a high risk of non-healing wounds in diabetics. This type of edema is usually treated with manual decongestive therapy and diuretics. Medication Risks for Edema People who take thiazolidinedione medications are known to experience water retention. Thiazolidinediones are commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes as they help the body produce more insulin. However, one of the downsides of this medication is that it can lead to weight gain and edema. Preventing and Treating Edema Edema can have a lot of harmful effects if not treated like loss of vision. One of the main ways to stop fluid r Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes Basics

Basics of diabetes Diabetes is a condition caused by lack of a chemical in the body (a hormone) called insulin. There are two major forms of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes eventually no insulin is produced and individuals require insulin injections for survival. It used to be thought this only presented in children, but it is now clear this can occur at any age. The other more common form of diabetes called type 2 diabetes occurs due to the body's resistance to the effects of insulin in addition to an insufficient quantity of insulin. However, in this type of diabetes there is usually some insulin produced. For both types of diabetes, blood glucose levels are elevated. Furthermore, people with diabetes are prone to certain complications not seen in those without diabetes. These complications involve the eye (retinopathy), kidney (nephropathy) and nerves (neuropathy). People with diabetes also get early hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), leading to early heart attacks and strokes. The good news for people with diabetes is that with proper care all of these problems can be avoided. Immediate medical attention Uncontrolled diabetes presents with frequent thirst and urination. Over time, patients will become dehydrated as the glucose is "spilling" over into the urine. If insulin deficiency is severe enough, fat stores are used for energy as glucose cannot get into cells. This problem is much more common with type 1 diabetes and is called "ketoacidosis". It can be diagnosed at home with a simple urine test. When significant ketones are found in the urine, it is important to be in touch with a physician immediately. There are other conditions that require immediate attention. Blurry vision in someone with known diabetic eye disease or someone with a long history of di Continue reading >>

7 Tips To Treat Swollen Feet In Diabetics

7 Tips To Treat Swollen Feet In Diabetics

Diabetics often complain of swelling in the feet and legs. It happens due to improper blood circulation because an increased pressure damages blood capillaries. Damaged capillaries cause peripheral oedema, leakage of fluids into surrounding tissues, which causes swelling. However, several other reasons can play a role in causing swollen feet in diabetics. The risk of infections and severe complications like foot ulcers and gangrene that can even lead to limb amputation can increase in diabetics with swollen feet. That’s why, you should not ignore even minor swelling in your feet. In most cases, when the swelling has just started, simple lifestyle changes can reduce swelling and provide relief to a great extent. Here are 7 tips for diabetics to reduce swelling in the feet. Image: Getty Continue reading >>

Edema

Edema

Abnormal accumulation of fluid in various body tissues, causing swelling. The swelling may affect any of a number of body sites, such as the legs, ankles, and feet; the hands; the back or abdomen; and even the eyelids. Edema may be caused by a number of different medical conditions and can also be a side effect of certain drugs. Here are some possible causes: Congestive heart failure may result in edema. To compensate for heart failure, in which the heart fails to circulate adequate amounts of blood, the kidneys retain sodium to help the body hold on to water and increase the volume of blood. Deep vein thrombosis, the formation of a blood clot in a deep vein within the leg, can cause edema by damaging the valves within the veins that control normal blood flow. This type of edema most commonly makes the ankles swell but may also cause swelling in the calf or even the thigh. Kidney diseases, such as diabetic nephropathy, may cause edema due to excess sodium and fluid retention. Edema may be a side effect of certain drugs, including the oral diabetes drugs pioglitazone (brand name Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia). People sometimes experience mild edema when starting on insulin therapy, but this generally goes away within a few weeks. If you experience any unusual swelling, be sure to contact your doctor. It may be the result of a medical condition you don’t know you have. Treating edema involves treating the underlying medical condition that is causing it or adjusting medication as necessary. This article was written by Robert S. Dinsmoor, a Contributing Editor of Diabetes Self-Management. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provide Continue reading >>

Remedy For Diabetic Leg Discoloration & Swelling

Remedy For Diabetic Leg Discoloration & Swelling

Once the arteries in your legs deliver oxygenated blood to the legs and feet, the veins must then work against the pull of gravity to get that blood back to the heart. Problems arise when there’s insufficient blood pressure in those veins to get the blood back to the heart--a common condition diabetics live with daily. What Happens Leg muscles squeeze the veins to push the blood back to the heart. The blood goes through valves that only open one-way. When the muscles relax, the valves close and the blood can’t flow back. Diabetes can weaken the muscle tissue, allowing blood to leak which often leads to leg discoloration and swelling. Medicate The best way to avoid this problem is to keep your diabetes under control. Monitor your sugar levels. Be careful about what you eat and make sure to take your medications (if your doctor has prescribed them). In addition, consult your doctor if you begin to see leg discoloration and swelling because it could be an indication that your medication is not working and needs to be adjusted. Treatments There are a few treatments you can try to keep the blood moving. Your doctor may prescribe blood thinners to aid circulation. Anti-inflammatory pills can be useful in reducing swelling. Your doctor might also prescribe corticosteroids or gout medications that can reduce inflammation. Management The best way to avoid this problem is to get moving. Walk more; it improves the blood flow through your legs. You can also lie down and raise your legs to ease the flow of blood from your feet to your heart. Follow a low-sodium diet to help reduce swelling. Daily Care Check your legs and feet daily for any signs of discoloration. Besides the swelling and discoloration, you might find dry or itchy skin or thickened toe nails. Washing your feet in Continue reading >>

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

Most patients suffering from diabetes complain of swelling in the feet and legs. The main reason for this problem is improper blood circulation due to damaged blood capillaries as a result of increased pressure. Damaged capillaries cause peripheral oedema, leakage of fluids into surrounding tissues, which causes swelling. But, there can be several other reasons that could cause swelling in the feet. Therefore proper diagnosis is important. Poor circulation is also one of the reasons why wounds in diabetic patients don’t heal quickly. Mr Bhushan Hemade of Diaped, a chain of multi-disciplinary foot clinics says ‘Foot problems are common in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious.’ They increases the risk of infections and severe complications like foot ulcers and gangrene that can even lead to limb amputation. That’s why, you should not ignore even minor swelling in your feet. In most cases, when the swelling has just started, simple lifestyle changes can reduce swelling and provide relief to a great extent. 1. Exercise regularly: Mr Hemade says ‘Regular exercise will improve bone and joint health in your feet and legs, improve circulation to your legs, and will also help to stabilize your blood sugar levels. But you should consult your doctor prior to beginning any exercise program.’ Do not practice rigorous exercises as it can lead to exercise-induced oedema. 2. Elevate your legs: Elevation of feet (above the heart level) using a support or a pillow for 10-15 minutes every day can help to reduce swelling. Elevation drains out excess fluid from the surrounding tissues and improves circulation. 3. Use compression stockings and bandages: Compression products are now widely available for foot care in diabetics. They exert pressure on the affected are Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Article

Diabetic Foot Care Article

A A A Diabetes mellitus (DM) represents several diseases in which high blood glucose levels over time can damage the nerves, kidneys, eyes, and blood vessels. Diabetes can also decrease the body's ability to fight infection. When diabetes is not well controlled, damage to the organs and impairment of the immune system is likely. Foot problems commonly develop in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious. With damage to the nervous system, a person with diabetes may not be able to feel his or her feet properly. Normal sweat secretion and oil production that lubricates the skin of the foot is impaired. These factors together can lead to abnormal pressure on the skin, bones, and joints of the foot during walking and can lead to breakdown of the skin of the foot. Sores may develop. Damage to blood vessels and impairment of the immune system from diabetes make it difficult to heal these wounds. Bacterial infection of the skin, connective tissues, muscles, and bones can then occur. These infections can develop into gangrene. Because of the poor blood flow, antibiotics cannot get to the site of the infection easily. Often, the only treatment for this is amputation of the foot or leg. If the infection spreads to the bloodstream, this process can be life-threatening. People with diabetes must be fully aware of how to prevent foot problems before they occur, to recognize problems early, and to seek the right treatment when problems do occur. Although treatment for diabetic foot problems has improved, prevention - including good control of blood sugar level - remains the best way to prevent diabetic complications. People with diabetes should learn how to examine their own feet and how to recognize the early signs and symptoms of diabetic foot problems. They should also l Continue reading >>

6 Best Fixes For Pain And Swelling In Your Feet And Ankles

6 Best Fixes For Pain And Swelling In Your Feet And Ankles

Have you ever looked down at yourankles and feet, first not recognizing them as your own, then, realizing they are swollen?Whether from long days on your feet, travel or surgery, it happens. For pregnant women, it isalmost inevitable. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Swelling in your ankles and feet isuncomfortable, and sometimes it keeps you from moving freely. But, there are several ways to relieve swelling from everyday causes and sometimes you can even prevent it, sayspodiatric physician and surgeon Georgeanne Botek, DPM ,Head of the Section of Podiatry and Medical Director of the Diabetic Foot Clinic at Cleveland Clinic. She saysswelling (or what doctors refer to as edema ) happens when your body retains fluid in the lower legs, ankles and feet. It most often occurs on both sides of the body, and its not an emergency situation. When it comes to swelling, its about management and getting through the day, she says. Theres nothing thats necessarily curative. RELATED: Lymphedema: What You Should Know About Your Risk, Treatment Options How to relieveswollen, painful feet and ankles You can often treat the symptoms of swelling that occurs on both sides of your body yourself, Dr. Botek says. Here are some ideas that can help: 1. Compression socks. Available at your local drug or grocery store, compression socks provide pain relief and prevent fluid collection in your legs, ankles and feet. They come in light, medium and heavy weights, so be sure you select a pair that isnt too tight for your body. Dr. Botek suggests starting with lightweight ones that measure between 12-15 mm or 15-20 mm of mercury. 2. Elevation. Prop your legs u Continue reading >>

Peripheral Edema And Diabetes

Peripheral Edema And Diabetes

By Elizabeth Woolley | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Peripheral edema is swelling from the collection of fluid in the feet, ankles, and legs. It can occur in one or both of your lower extremities. If you have diabetes, you need to take extra precautions when you have edema. Edema is the result of damage to capillaries or increased pressure causing capillaries to leak fluid into surrounding tissues and result in swelling. People with diabetes often have circulation problems that can cause wounds to heal slowly or not at all. Edema makes it more difficult for wounds to heal. Therefore, controlling edema is essential. There are many common causes of edema that are fairly benign. Some examples of more common causes of peripheral edema, not specifically related to diabetes, include physical inactivity, standing or sitting for long periods of time, surgery, burns, hot weather, pregnancy, menstruation, menopause, contraceptive pills, certain medications, excessive salt intake, malnutrition, or a bad diet. Edema may present in only one extremity (rather than both) due to deep venous thrombosis (DVT), cellulitis , osteomyelitis , trauma, a ruptured Baker's cyst , or a lymphatic obstruction. Peripheral edema can also be associated with more serious conditionsmany of which can be associated with diabetes complications such as heart disease , venous insufficiency, liver disease, and kidney disease . Certain diabetes medications can also cause edema, specifically the thiazolidinedione drugs Actos and Avandia. These drugs have come under a cloud because of their potential cardiac adverse effects, and should not be used in anyone who has had a history of congestive heart failure. People with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or heart failure (such as congestive Continue reading >>

Calf Pain & Diabetes Connection

Calf Pain & Diabetes Connection

In diabetes, calf or leg pain can be due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), to peripheral artery disease (PAD) or to deep vein thrombosis (DVT). All of these conditions can result in pain, cramping, achiness and swelling in the calves and the lower leg, ankle and feet. And all of them can be associated with severe diabetic foot problems including ulcers, infections and weakened bones that can lead to fractures. The pain in the calf can be in the gastrocnemius muscles (often shortened to “the gastrocs”) or to the soleus or plantaris muscles. Diabetes, Oxidative Stress and DPN DPN results from nerve damage, primarily in the feet and legs, but sometimes also in the hands and arms. One of the main causes of DPN, it is believed, is the accumulating toxic effect of high levels of sugar on the nerves and surrounding tissue. The high levels of sugar can be toxic on their own some believe[1], but in addition, high levels of sugar can increase the levels of substances called free radicals. Free radicals are naturally produced in the body as a result of normal reactions. The body also has naturally occurring antioxidants, primarily enzymes such as the selenoproteins (proteins with the trace mineral selenium), sulfur-based proteins such as glutathione, Vitamin C, Vitamin A, beta carotenes and Vitamin E (which humans need to get through the diet) and others. These natural antioxidants can however, be overwhelmed by the high levels of free radical which may be produced by cells bathed in high levels of sugar.[2] This can eventually lead to a condition in the cells called “oxidative stress” and it is this damage—caused by high levels of free radicals which damage the cell’s DNA and the proteins in the cells which can damage nerve cells and result in DPN. Diabetes, Hi Continue reading >>

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Tweet Edema (known as oedema in the UK) is a build up of fluid in the body (water retention) which causes swelling. Edema commonly affects the legs, ankles, feet and wrist. Water retention is often treatable, with treatment varying depending on the cause. Symptoms of edema The main symptom of edema is swelling of the affected area. Other symptoms that may occur, along with swelling, include: Weight gain Aching limbs Stiff joints Discolouration of skin Hypertension (high blood pressure) What causes swelling in the legs, feet and ankles? Swollen ankles and legs will often be brought on, or aggravated, by long periods of standing. A number of medications can increase the risk of oedema. Such medications include corticosteroids, blood pressure medications and the contraceptive pill. Water retention may also be caused by a number of conditions including: A high intake of salt can increase the problems of swelling in people with kidney disease. Treatment for edema Treatment for edema may vary depending on the cause. Water retention may be resolved if the underlying cause can be adequately treated. Regular physical activity and preventing long periods of standing can help reduce water retention. A low dietary salt intake is advisable, particularly if fluid retention has been brought on by kidney disease. If you are overweight, weight loss can help with reducing fluid retention. Diuretics, also known as ‘water tablets’, help to remove fluid from the body and may be prescribed for some causes of oedema. Prevention You can reduce your risk of edema by taking steps to prevent kidney disease and heart failure from developing. This can be achieved through good control of blood glucose levels, regular exercise and a healthy diet. If you can avoid long periods of standing, this wi Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Edema

Diabetes And Edema

Edema is a medical condition caused by the abnormal fluid retention in the spaces between the body's cells or in the circulatory system. This medical condition causes puffiness and swelling in several areas of the body, including legs, arms, feet, hands, lungs, heart, or stomach area. Is there a connection between edema and diabetes? Let’s find out. There are basically three main types of edema associated with diabetes - macular edema, pulmonary edema, and foot and leg edema. The causes of diabetic edema include: Acute liver failure, cirrhosis Renal artery stenosis Chronic hepatitis Cardiovascular complications Nephrotic Syndrome or acute renal failure Medications used to treat diabetes Other factors such as premenstrual fluid retention, thiamine deficiency, protein losing enteropathy, pregnancy and acute anaphylaxis, also contribute to diabetic edema. Macular edema is a condition in which the macular tissue area, near the center of the retina gets filled with fluid. This area is mainly responsible for vision. Macular edema caused from diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes. The vision loss can progress, leading to eventual blindness. There are two types of macular edema, focal macular edema and diffuse macular edema. The first one is caused by vascular abnormalities, and can be treated using focal laser treatment. The second type is caused by dilated retinal capillaries. This condition can be treated with grid laser treatment, which is used to seal the leakages. Macular edema is caused by the increasing deposition of fluids and proteins on or under the macula of the eye. The macula is identified as a pale yellow area close to the center of the retina. A local swelling results from fluid and protein retention in the macula. The swelling soon directly press Continue reading >>

Swollen Ankles And Swollen Feet

Swollen Ankles And Swollen Feet

Swollen ankles and swollen feet definition and facts Swelling of the ankle and feet is relatively frequent symptom in most people. In itself it does not represent a disease but rather the symptom of an underlying disease. Causes of swollen ankles and feet are numerous including: Dependent swelling (edema) Medications Injuries Infections Others (infrequent causes) Most people who spend time standing or sitting and those people with causes listed above are at risk for feet and ankle swelling. Swelling symptoms depend on the underlying cause so symptoms may range from a painless increase in foot and ankle diameter (size) to skin changes of color, and texture changes that may be localized to one or both or ankles. Other symptoms may include warm skin and ulceration with pus drainage Almost all feet and ankle swelling is diagnosed by clinical observation and physical examination; tests are ordered to diagnose underlying causes Treatment of swollen feet and ankles is dependent on diagnosing the underlying cause(s); some people require no treatment while others with underlying cause(s) may require several different treatments. Complications vary according to the underlying disease process and vary from no complications to skin ulcerations that can lead to infection and death Swollen ankles and swollen feet may be prevented in many people by simple methods, but in some individuals, symptom reduction or prevention is dependent on more complex methods related to the underlying cause(s). Burning or Swollen Feet? What Foot Pain Says About Your Health What are the most common causes swollen ankles and swollen feet? The causes of swollen feet and ankles are numerous; the following is a list of most of the major causes with some examples. Dependent swelling (or edema): swelling due to Continue reading >>

Diabetic Legs Swelling Causes And Remedies

Diabetic Legs Swelling Causes And Remedies

Many people suffering from diabetes complain about swelling in legs and feet. Usually, this swelling is painless and due to retention of fluid. There can be numerous reasons leading to such retention, from very high and uncontrolled sugar levels (which is dangerous for various organs) to the secondary complications of diabetes. Usually, fluid retention indicates that either heart of a diabetic person has become weak. Thus there is a poor flow of fluids, or kidneys are not functioning properly. In some cases, it may be due to liver disease or some anti-diabetic medications. Other reasons of such swelling could be a disease of blood vessels, or deficit of certain micronutrients and electrolytes(“Swelling and Diabetes – Swollen Legs, Ankle & Feet, Peripheral Edema,” n.d.). Let us look in detail at some leading causes of swelling of legs in diabetes. Congested heart failure The major complication of diabetes is weakening of heart and blood vessels. Congested Heart Failure (CHF) often coexists in diabetes(Nasir & Aguilar, 2012). In fact, a person suffering from diabetes is at much higher risk of heart failure(Nichols, Gullion, Koro, Ephross, & Brown, 2004). In CHF though the heart is functioning, but its pumping power is compromised, which means that it is not strong enough for blood to circulate properly in our body. Things are further made worse by stiffening of arteries(“Heart failure,” n.d.). All this leads to swelling and accumulation of fluids in the legs. Kidney failure More than one-third people suffering from diabetes have chronic kidney disease(“Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease,” 2014). Diabetes is slowly emerging one of the leading causes of chronic kidney disease. Almost half of people going for dialysis, also have diabetes(Cavanaugh, 2007). In d Continue reading >>

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