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What Causes Itching In Diabetics?

What Causes Itching And Burning In Diabetics?

What Causes Itching And Burning In Diabetics?

Why does diabetes and itching seem to go hand in hand? Very few things are more annoying than feeling itching and burning sensations on your body. While any number of diabetic complications could be the cause of these sensations, the typical causes center on four distinct areas. Itching and burning in diabetics is usually caused by peripheral nerve damage, allergic reactions various skin conditions or fungal infections. Peripheral Nerve Damage First, peripheral nerve damage may be the culprit. This type of neuropathy particularly affects the feet and legs. It has many symptoms including a burning sensation in the lower legs. The usual treatment for this is to maintain proper glucose levels. If the skin is particularly sensitive, a bed cradle can be used at night to lift the sheets off of the bed, avoiding any rubbing or contact with the skin. Allergic Reactions Second, allergic reactions to medication can also cause itching. You can sometimes tell if you are having a reaction if you get a rash after taking medications. Obviously, if you think you think you are experiencing a reaction, please see your doctor. Skin Problems Third, various skin conditions associated with diabetes could be causing the problem. Bacterial infections can cause skin discomfort. Good glucose management and antibiotics are the primary ways of treating bacterial infections. Your doctor should be able to provide a prescription if appropriate. Fungal Infections Fungal infections also cause itchy burning rashes. This infection is yeast-like, causing conditions such as jock itch, athlete’s foot, and vaginal yeast infections. If you have this type of issue, you will need a prescription from your doctor to take care of it. Many times, fungal infections are caused by the candida albicans fungus. These Continue reading >>

Genital Itching – Symptom Of Diabetes

Genital Itching – Symptom Of Diabetes

Itching and irritation around the genitals can be a sign of high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) and diabetes. Causes Possible causes of genital itching include: Diabetes Eczema Low estrogen levels in women Psoriasis Pubic lice Reactions to chemicals used to wash clothes Yeast infections Itching as a symptom of diabetes If diabetes is causing the itching in men, it tends to lead to itching under the foreskin of the penis. In women, it can lead to itching of the vulva, the skin on the outside of the vagina. If diabetes is the cause, you may notice other symptoms of diabetes, such as needing to go to the toilet more often than normal. If you suspect you may have diabetes, see your doctor for a diagnosis. Genital itching and diabetes Itchy privates can occur if blood glucose levels run high, causing sugar to be passed out in the urine. Sugar makes a fertile breeding ground for bacteria and it is a buildup of bacteria around the genitals that causes the itching. If you’re getting itchy down there as a result of high sugar levels, wash the affected area to clean away any build up of bacteria. Don’t use any harsh soaps that might lead to irritation. If you can bring your blood glucose levels back to normal, this also should help the itching to subside. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high levels of glucose in the bloodstream which leads to hyperglycemia if untreated. It is strongly linked to obesity and unhealthy lifestyle habits such as lack of physical activity, poor diet and smoking. How common is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common form of diabetes mellitus, accounting for roughly 90% of all cases of diabetes. It affects an estimated 330 million people worldwide, including over 29 million people in the Unite Continue reading >>

Dry, Itchy Penis A Symptom Of Diabetes?

Dry, Itchy Penis A Symptom Of Diabetes?

A dry, itchy penis can be caused by many different problems, ranging from dry skin to allergies to heart disease. Most cases of penile itching and dryness are easily dealt with and temporary, but men who have chronically dry, itchy skin may need to look deeper for a solution. Ongoing health issues such as psoriasis, eczema and even diabetes can cause these, as well as other, skin issues that may affect the penis. Since psoriasis and eczema are already fairly well-known for causing skin problems, it is worth exploring the diabetes angle a little bit further. Whether men have already been diagnosed with diabetes or they are trying to pinpoint the cause of their symptoms, it is useful to know about how this increasingly common disease can impact penis health. Diabetes is a systemic disease most commonly seen in overweight individuals. It occurs when the body is not able to produce enough insulin or cannot use it properly. Insulin is a hormone that keeps glucose (blood sugar) levels under control. Having high levels of blood sugar for extended periods of time can cause significant damage to all parts of the body, and the problems related to diabetes can be extensive. The skin, including the penile skin, is frequently affected, and men may experience any of the following conditions that present as a dry and/or itchy penis. 1) Thrush. Men with diabetes are especially prone to thrush, a fungal infection caused by the Candida albicans yeast (the same organism responsible for feminine yeast infections). Thrush is characterized by skin that is dry and itchy; deep fissures may also develop, especially in the foreskin in uncircumcised men. Some men may also have swelling and/or a white or yellowish discharge that has a consistency similar to cottage cheese. An over-the-counter anti Continue reading >>

Itchy Skin And Diabetes

Itchy Skin And Diabetes

Tweet Itchy skin can be a sign of diabetes, particularly if other diabetes symptoms are also present. High blood sugar levels over a prolong period of time is one cause of itchy skin. In some cases, itchy skin may be caused by complications of diabetes such as nerve damage or kidney disease. Itching of the feet, legs or ankles is a common complaint in people with diabetes that may occur as a result of a period of too high sugar levels. Itching can range from being annoying to severe. Itching can be relieved through treatment, and may be eliminated if the underlying cause is treated. Causes of itchy skin Itchiness of the lower limbs can result from a number of causes including: Dry skin Poor circulation Dermatitis (eczema) Psoriasis Allergies Diabetic neuropathy Diabetic nephropathy Athletes foot Urticaria (hives) Chillblains A number of medications, such as antibiotics, antifungal drugs or opiate painkillers, may also lead to itchy skin. Diagnosis of the underlying problem It is advisable to see your doctor if itching is severe or persistent. You should also see your doctor if itching affects your whole body or if other symptoms accompany the itching. Diagnosis of the reason behind itching may be identified through taking a skin sample or through taking a blood sample to check for signs of an underlying cause. Itch, scratch cycle The itch, scratch cycle describes a process in which responding to an itch by scratching can damage or break the skin causing inflammatory chemicals to be released from the body which further intensify the need to itch. Itching may be relieved through avoiding chemicals with perfumes which may irritate the skin and avoiding exposure of your skin to hot water. Moisturising cream can be used to moisturise dry skin or as a preventative measure aga Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

If you have diabetic skin problems, like itchy skin, it's important to care for your skin properly – read on for tips to add to your skin care regime! If you have diabetes then you’re more likely to have dry skin, which can lead to itchiness. Are you one of those who suffer with diabetes and itchy skin? Itchy skin and diabetes often go together. The good news is that by taking care of your skin, you may be able to help reduce the risk of developing skin problems due to dryness and maintain healthy-looking, smooth skin. 1 Itchy skin, diabetes related or not, can often be made worse by washing with the wrong skin care products that increase skin dryness. Although you might think you’re doing the right thing by keeping your skin clean, if you’re using the wrong products, or washing too frequently, then you can actually aggravate the problem. Try to use mild and gentle soaps that are free from harsh chemicals and heavy perfumes. Unless it’s necessary, don’t wash your skin more than twice a day – washing too often, especially with hot water, can actually dry the skin out more. Avoiding these triggers may help to minimize itchiness. 2 If you’ve got diabetes, itchy skin due to dryness can be a concern. A good moisturizer like Vaseline® Intensive Care™ Advanced Repair Unscented Lotion may help to soothe and relieve itchiness. With micro-droplets of Vaseline® Jelly and glycerin, this lotion locks in essential moisture to help facilitate the skin’s natural recovery process. It’s fast absorbing and gentle on skin. Moisturizing can help to calm your dry skin and may reduce the urge to scratch. Remember, even though dry, itchy skin can be uncomfortable, always try your best to avoid scratching as this can lead to skin becoming damaged. If you have diabetes an Continue reading >>

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

Edit Article Three Methods:Stopping the Itch with Lifestyle ChangesStopping the Itch with Home RemediesStopping the Itch with MedicationCommunity Q&A Diabetics frequently experience horrible itching. It is a common side effect of elevated blood glucose levels, which is the defining factor of diabetes. If you suffer from unbearable itchiness, this wikiHow article explains ways that you can soothe your irritated skin. 1 Prevent skin from getting dry. Keep your skin moist and healthy by using moisturizers and skin creams. Avoid scented creams and lotions, BECAUSE you could have a reaction to them, causing more itching. Moisturize twice a day. Every time you shower, use one ounce or two tablespoons to moisturize your whole body, or use as needed.[1] You should also avoid using scented soaps BECAUSE the chemicals in it can cause skin to get dry and irritated. Use mild, unscented soaps instead. 2 Change your bathing style. Too frequent bathing can cause itching to get worse. Limit baths to once every 2 days. Bathing frequency can vary depending on climate, weather and your activities. However, once in two days should suffice. Avoid using very hot water; it tends to make the skin more irritated. Use water at room temperature or lower. Hot water dilates vessels speeding up metabolism of insulin, which can trigger hypoglycemia.[2] Another reason why diabetics should not use hot water is diabetics suffering from nerve damage lose sensitivity to pain and temperature and may unknowingly burn themselves with hot water. 3 Care for your skin in the summer. Summer is a time of sun and fun, but sun can also seriously irritate skin. To lessen itching in the summer, wear clothes made from light materials like cotton, chiffon or linen. Certain cloths like wool and silk can cause irritation Continue reading >>

Pruritus Vulvae

Pruritus Vulvae

Most women experience a slight vulval itch now and again. However, pruritus vulvae means the itch is persistent and causes distress. Itchy vulva (pruritus vulvae) is itching of the skin of the vulva. The vulva is the skin outside the vagina, including the lips of the vagina and the skin between the vagina and the anus. Itchy vulva is also called pruritus vulvae. Pruritus is the medical word for itch. What is an itchy vulva? 'Pruritus vulvae' simply means itching of the vulva. The vulva is the area of skin just outside the vagina. Most women experience a slight vulval itch now and again. However, pruritus vulvae means the itch is persistent and causes distress. The itch may be particularly bad at night and may disturb your sleep. About 1 woman in 10 sees a doctor about a persistent itchy vulva at some stage in her life. Vulval itching can affect any woman, at any age. It can lead to scratching and rubbing which can break the skin and can lead to soreness, bleeding and skin infections. What causes an itchy vulva? An itchy vulva (pruritus vulvae) is a symptom, not a condition in itself. It can be caused by many different conditions. Therefore, if you have a persistent itchy vulva, you should see your doctor to find out the cause. Causes of an itchy vulva tend to differ slightly between adults and children. However, they can include the following: Infections For example: Thrush. Threadworms. Scabies. Some sexually transmitted infections, such as trichomoniasis and genital warts. Sensitisation of the vulval skin Sensitivity of the vulval skin is the most common cause of persistent vulval itch. The vulval skin can become sensitive to anything that comes into contact with it, such as: Creams, including treatments for, for example, thrush. Soaps. Perfumes. Deodorants. Excessive Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

People with diabetes experience skin itching at higher rates than those without the condition. Ultimately, itching can lead to excessive scratching, which can cause discomfort and pain. A study of nearly 2,700 people with diabetes and 499 without diabetes found that itching was a common diabetes symptom. An estimated 11.3 percent of those with diabetes reported skin itching versus 2.9 percent of people without diabetes. A person with diabetes should not ignore itchy skin. Dry, irritated, or itchy skin is more likely to become infected, and someone with diabetes may not be able to fight off infections as well as someone who does not have diabetes. There are a variety of treatments available that can help to reduce diabetes-related skin itching so that a person can be more comfortable and avoid other skin complications. Causes of diabetes itching There are many reasons why a person with diabetes might experience itching more often than someone else. Sometimes itching can result from damaged nerve fibers located in the outer layers of skin. Often, the cause of diabetes-related itching is diabetic polyneuropathy or peripheral neuropathy. This condition occurs when high blood glucose levels damage nerve fibers, particularly those in the feet and hands. Before the nerve damage occurs, the body experiences high levels of cytokines. These are inflammatory substances that can lead to a person's skin itching. Sometimes, persistent itchiness may indicate that someone with diabetes is at risk of nerve damage, so the itchiness should never be ignored. Also, people with diabetes can experience associated disorders that include kidney or liver failure. These conditions may also cause itching. A person with diabetes can experience skin itching related to a new medication they are takin Continue reading >>

Got An Itchy Diabetic Dog? Listen Up

Got An Itchy Diabetic Dog? Listen Up

As a veterinarian in South Florida, I can’t tell you how many itchy allergic pets I see every week. I see pets with food allergies, flea allergies and a lot of pets with hay fever (aka atopic dermatitis or atopy). When veterinarians first see a pet with allergic dermatitis we must first figure out if it is indeed an allergy. There are non-allergic causes of itchiness such as mange. For many causes of dermatitis we institute bathing protocols, omega 3 fatty acid supplementation, flea control, diet trials, antihistamines, etc. Certainly we get a detailed history of when the pet first became itchy, if there was a seasonal component initially, and where the pet seemed itchiest. Yep, we put on our Sherlock Holmes hats and do our best to make the pet comfortable while we sort out the cause. Additionally, we choose our treatments based on our gut feeling because we are sensitive to our clients potential financial constraints. If we find that a pet has atopy (again, that’s the fancy word for hay fever in pets), we will institute regular bathing, antihistamines, oftentimes cyclosporine. If we have a pet that potentially has a food allergy we start an elimination diet, such as a novel protein source or a hydrolyzed protein source. If we have a pet that has fleas we treat the environment and institute regular flea control for all of the pets in the home. For any of these conditions we may reach for steroids during a flare up of signs. Uh oh! What if your pet is also a diabetic? Then we vets go to the back of the hospital and curse and grumble while we contemplate how to make this diabetic pet comfortable without using steroids – which will derail most diabetics. Good news! We have a new tool in our toolbox. Of course we still need to do all the things we would otherwise do f Continue reading >>

What Products Minimize Itching In Diabetics?

What Products Minimize Itching In Diabetics?

My wife is a type 2 diabetic, and she deals with a lot of skin itchiness. In fact, I'm convinced that she's going to run into even more medical complications just because she's always scratching itches. What products are out there to help diabetics with itchiness? The best treatment for her skin itching really depends on the cause. Most causes of skin itching are unrelated to diabetes. Allergic reactions can cause itching because of histamine release. Skin infections with fungi or parasites such as scabies can cause severe itching in different parts of the body. These are best treated by treating the cause, but symptomatically can be helped with antihistamines such as Benadryl. With that said diabetes can result in nerve damage which can manifest as pain, burning, and sometimes itching. This nerve damage takes place first in the feet and hands and progresses towards the body. If this is the area where she is itching then the diabetes is likely related. If this is the case, then good blood sugar control is the first step towards relieving her symptoms. In addition medications such as gabapentin (Neurontin) can be very effective at treating this type of discomfort. I suggest that you schedule an appointment for your wife with her primary care physician. He or she can determine what is causing this itching and make sure that no complications such as skin infections have happened because of her scratching. If the itching is not due to diabetes, then your wife may warrant a referral to a dermatologist for further evaluation and treatment. This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advic Continue reading >>

Let's Start At The Beginning

Let's Start At The Beginning

You have diabetes. Now what? You are not alone. According to the International Diabetes Federation, it was estimated in 2015 that one in 11 adults had diabetes, and one in two was not even diagnosed. A diabetes diagnosis is an important first step in getting your disease under control. Learning that you have diabetes can come as a shock and be overwhelming. At OneTouch.com, we are here to help you. This site is designed to help you learn more about the disease: you'll find information on the importance of blood glucose monitoring and taking your medicine when it's prescribed – be it pills or injectables, including insulin. We'll explain the basics of eating healthy and being physically active. We'll show you some things to watch out for, and help you learn how to take care of yourself to help reduce the risk of complications. In short, we'll be here for you through your journey with diabetes, step by step. Yes, your life is about to change, but when you successfully manage your diabetes you improve your health in the short term and lower your chances of long-term health risks: you can live a longer and healthier life. Don't expect perfection. It’s not a race or competition. Just commit yourself to doing your personal best. Tell yourself that you're worth it. We'll be with you every step of the way. * IDF Diabetes Atlas (7th Ed.) (2015). Brussels, Belgium: International Diabetes Federation. Continue reading >>

What Causes Itching & Burning In A Diabetic?

What Causes Itching & Burning In A Diabetic?

[an error occurred while processing this directive] If you are diabetic and have been experiencing itching and burning sensations in parts of your body like your feet, legs, or hands, you almost certainly have a condition called diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathies can be caused by other problems besides diabetes, but if you're a diabetic, your neuropathy is very probably related directly to your disease (but note that itching and burning can also be caused by something as simple as dry skin and poor circulation, both common in people with diabetes). Neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders. It's typical for people who have diabetes to develop nerve damage throughout their bodies over time. Some diabetics who get this nerve damage will have it show up as symptoms like itching, burning, strange and sometimes uncomfortable tingling sensations, or loss of feeling in their extremities. Diabetics are susceptible to developing nerve problems at any time. As one might expect, however, the risk of it occurring goes up with age and the longer the time they have had diabetes. Diabetic neuropathies are much more common in those who have trouble with controlling their blood sugar levels. Diabetics who are significantly more prone to neuropathy include people who have elevated levels of blood fat or high blood pressure, and people who are overweight or obese. Proximal neuropathy begins as pain in the hips, thighs, legs, or buttocks, and typically on just one or the other side of the body. Eventually, this kind of neuropathy will lead to weakness in the legs and from there cause the person to degenerate to the point where they are unable to stand up from a seated position without aid. At first, the symptoms of neuropathy may be barely noticeable. At other times, the symptoms might b Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

The symptoms are not always obvious, and many people could be suffering with the condition for years before they learn they have it. Every week 4,500 people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes across the UK. However, experts warn thousands could be living with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The condition, which can be caused by being overweight and poor diet can cause blindness, limbs to be amputated - every week diabetes causes 150 amputations - and even kidney failure. It has even been linked to a reduce life expectancy if the condition it not managed well. People also need to ensure they look after their feet properly as high levels of blood glucose can cause foot problems. This can stop nerves working so people might not feel when they have cut their feet or burned themselves. The main symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Urinating more often than usual - particularly at night Excessive urination can be triggered by excess glucose in the blood which interferes with the kidney’s ability to concentrate urine. Feeling thirsty Kidneys have to work harder in people with type 2 diabetes. Puldisia is the term given to excessive thirst. Diabetes.co.uk said: “If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.” If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body Feeling tired Feeling tired could be a symptom of many conditions - but it can be caused in people who have low blood sugar. Itching around the penis or vagina Thrush - a yeast infection - tends to affect warm, moist areas of the body such as the vagina, penis, mouth and certain areas Continue reading >>

Diabetes (blood Glucose)

Diabetes (blood Glucose)

What is diabetes? Diabetes Mellitus as it is known in full, is a common health condition where there is too much glucose in the blood. Glucose is a type of sugar that comes from carbohydrates in the food we eat and is also produced by the liver and is our body’s main source of energy. Most of the food we eat is broken down into glucose. The level of glucose in the blood is regulated by a hormone called insulin. Insulin stimulates cells to absorb enough glucose from the blood for the energy they need. Insulin also stimulates the liver to absorb and store any glucose that’s left over. People who have diabetes either do not produce insulin, produce insufficient insulin or the insulin they do produce does not work properly, so the glucose builds up in your blood instead of moving into the cells. Insulin is made by a gland called the pancreas, which lies just behind the stomach. Insulin allows glucose to move from the blood into the body’s millions of cells and be converted into energy needed for daily life. There are 2 main types of diabetes Type 1, also known as insulin dependent diabetes, develops when the insulin producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed and the person stops producing their own insulin. This may be due to a combination of hereditary and environmental factors, but it could also be as a result of damage to the pancreas from a virus. It generally affects children and young adults of both sexes and will usually become apparent before the age of 40. Type 2, also known as non insulin dependent diabetes, is the most common type of diabetes. Type 2 usually appears in older people (over 40) though as levels of obesity in the UK are rising, more and more younger people are being diagnosed. Type 2 happens when the pancreas fails to produce enough in Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

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