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What Causes Itching In Diabetics?

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

Edit Article Three Methods:Stopping the Itch with Lifestyle ChangesStopping the Itch with Home RemediesStopping the Itch with MedicationCommunity Q&A Diabetics frequently experience horrible itching. It is a common side effect of elevated blood glucose levels, which is the defining factor of diabetes. If you suffer from unbearable itchiness, this wikiHow article explains ways that you can soothe your irritated skin. 1 Prevent skin from getting dry. Keep your skin moist and healthy by using moisturizers and skin creams. Avoid scented creams and lotions, BECAUSE you could have a reaction to them, causing more itching. Moisturize twice a day. Every time you shower, use one ounce or two tablespoons to moisturize your whole body, or use as needed.[1] You should also avoid using scented soaps BECAUSE the chemicals in it can cause skin to get dry and irritated. Use mild, unscented soaps instead. 2 Change your bathing style. Too frequent bathing can cause itching to get worse. Limit baths to once every 2 days. Bathing frequency can vary depending on climate, weather and your activities. However, once in two days should suffice. Avoid using very hot water; it tends to make the skin more irritated. Use water at room temperature or lower. Hot water dilates vessels speeding up metabolism of insulin, which can trigger hypoglycemia.[2] Another reason why diabetics should not use hot water is diabetics suffering from nerve damage lose sensitivity to pain and temperature and may unknowingly burn themselves with hot water. 3 Care for your skin in the summer. Summer is a time of sun and fun, but sun can also seriously irritate skin. To lessen itching in the summer, wear clothes made from light materials like cotton, chiffon or linen. Certain cloths like wool and silk can cause irritation Continue reading >>

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

Prev NEXT Diabetes is a complex disease, affecting many parts of the body. Some of the problems of the disease can be relieved with simple things right from the kitchen, though. And for a person with diabetes, a little relief never hurts. Home Remedies From the Cupboard Olive oil. Studies indicate this may reduce blood-sugar levels. Use it in salad dressing or wherever cooking oils are indicated. For an inexpensive and easy no-stick olive oil spray-on coating, buy an oil mister in any department store kitchen supply area and use it to spray your pans before cooking. Remember: As with all oils, olive oil is high in calories, and being overweight places you at risk for diabetes. Limiting the amount of olive oil by using the oil mister is a good way to control the calories. Peanut butter. After you've experienced an episode of low blood sugar and corrected it, follow up with a protein and carbohydrate snack. Peanut butter on a couple of crackers supplies both, and it's easy to fix when you may still feel a little jittery. Just avoid brands that contain added sugar, glucose, or jelly. Plastic container. If you're on insulin, keep your extra vials in the refrigerator. Designate a spot where your insulin bottle won't freeze, yet is away from the food. Then keep the vial in a plastic container, preferably one that shields it from light, in that spot to keep it from rolling around or getting knocked aside or misplaced. If the insulin bottle is frosted or the insulin clumps, do not use it. Consult your pharmacist and the package insert for information about proper storage. Salt. Dry, itchy skin is a side effect of diabetes, and soaking in a tub of salt water can be a great itchy skin reliever. Just add 1 cup table salt or sea salt to your bathwater. This solution will also softe Continue reading >>

Let's Start At The Beginning

Let's Start At The Beginning

You have diabetes. Now what? You are not alone. According to the International Diabetes Federation, it was estimated in 2015 that one in 11 adults had diabetes, and one in two was not even diagnosed. A diabetes diagnosis is an important first step in getting your disease under control. Learning that you have diabetes can come as a shock and be overwhelming. At OneTouch.com, we are here to help you. This site is designed to help you learn more about the disease: you'll find information on the importance of blood glucose monitoring and taking your medicine when it's prescribed – be it pills or injectables, including insulin. We'll explain the basics of eating healthy and being physically active. We'll show you some things to watch out for, and help you learn how to take care of yourself to help reduce the risk of complications. In short, we'll be here for you through your journey with diabetes, step by step. Yes, your life is about to change, but when you successfully manage your diabetes you improve your health in the short term and lower your chances of long-term health risks: you can live a longer and healthier life. Don't expect perfection. It’s not a race or competition. Just commit yourself to doing your personal best. Tell yourself that you're worth it. We'll be with you every step of the way. * IDF Diabetes Atlas (7th Ed.) (2015). Brussels, Belgium: International Diabetes Federation. Continue reading >>

Got An Itchy Diabetic Dog? Listen Up

Got An Itchy Diabetic Dog? Listen Up

As a veterinarian in South Florida, I can’t tell you how many itchy allergic pets I see every week. I see pets with food allergies, flea allergies and a lot of pets with hay fever (aka atopic dermatitis or atopy). When veterinarians first see a pet with allergic dermatitis we must first figure out if it is indeed an allergy. There are non-allergic causes of itchiness such as mange. For many causes of dermatitis we institute bathing protocols, omega 3 fatty acid supplementation, flea control, diet trials, antihistamines, etc. Certainly we get a detailed history of when the pet first became itchy, if there was a seasonal component initially, and where the pet seemed itchiest. Yep, we put on our Sherlock Holmes hats and do our best to make the pet comfortable while we sort out the cause. Additionally, we choose our treatments based on our gut feeling because we are sensitive to our clients potential financial constraints. If we find that a pet has atopy (again, that’s the fancy word for hay fever in pets), we will institute regular bathing, antihistamines, oftentimes cyclosporine. If we have a pet that potentially has a food allergy we start an elimination diet, such as a novel protein source or a hydrolyzed protein source. If we have a pet that has fleas we treat the environment and institute regular flea control for all of the pets in the home. For any of these conditions we may reach for steroids during a flare up of signs. Uh oh! What if your pet is also a diabetic? Then we vets go to the back of the hospital and curse and grumble while we contemplate how to make this diabetic pet comfortable without using steroids – which will derail most diabetics. Good news! We have a new tool in our toolbox. Of course we still need to do all the things we would otherwise do f Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Want another reason to get your blood sugar levels under control and keep them that way? Doing so can help you avoid many diabetes skin problems. Still, skin conditions related to this disease are common. As many as 1 out of 3 people with diabetes will have one. Fortunately, most can be or successfully treated before they turn into a serious problem. The key is to catch them early. Common Skin Conditions Linked to Diabetes Itching skin, also called pruritus, can have many causes, such as dry skin, poor blood flow, or a yeast infection. When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet. Lotion can help to keep your skin soft and moist, and prevent itching due to dry skin. Bacterial infections: Staphylococcus skin infections are more common and more serious in people with poorly controlled diabetes. When hair follicles are irritated, these bacteria can cause boils or an inflamed bump. Other infections include: Styes, which are infections of the eyelid glands Nail infections Most bacterial infections need to be treated with antibiotic pills. Talk with your doctor. Fungal infections: Warm, moist folds of the skin are the perfect breeding ground for these infections. Three common fungal infections are: Jock itch (red, itchy area on the genitals and the inside of the thighs) Athlete's foot (affects the skin between the toes) Ringworm (ring-shaped, scaly patches that can itch or blister and appear on the feet, groin, chest, stomach, scalp, or nails). A yeast-like fungus called "Candida albicans" causes many of the fungal infections that happen to people with diabetes. Women are likely to get this in their vaginas. People also tend to get this infection on the corners of their mouth. It feels like small cuts and is called "angular ch Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Lead To Intense Itching

Diabetes Can Lead To Intense Itching

Question: Can intense itching be a side effect for someone with diabetes whose blood sugars are poorly controlled? Answer: Poorly controlled diabetes is one possible cause for unexplained itching. Exactly how diabetes causes itching isn't certain, but suggested causes include diabetic nerve root injury, metabolic abnormalities from widely fluctuating blood sugars, and dry skin. If this is the cause, it should improve with better efforts to lower the blood sugars. That said, there are many other causes for severe itching. Dry skin from eczema is a common cause that's fairly easy to treat with moisturizers and steroid cream/ointment. Cholestatic liver disease with high blood levels of bilirubin is another cause of severe itching. A normal set of liver enzyme tests will rule this out. Either a very slow or a very fast thyroid can cause itching, so be sure to check thyroid function. Severe chronic kidney failure can also cause itching from the buildup of toxins. High levels of circulating blood histamines from a tumor can cause itching, so be sure to check a blood histamine level. Folks who have a disorder called polycythemia vera may experience itching due to high circulating levels of histamine-producing mast cells. Certain cancers such as carcinoid syndrome or Hodgkin's/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma can cause extreme itching, so these need to be considered. Parasitic infections are another possible cause, especially after recent travel to endemic areas. Severe emotional stress/anxiety is one more interesting cause for unexplained itching I've encountered in my practice. Q: My blood pressure averages 120/60. I'm concerned about the bottom reading of 60 being too low. I seem to be rather drained, and wonder if it's because my pressure is too low. Is there any food or vitamin I ca Continue reading >>

Itchy Feet And Diabetes

Itchy Feet And Diabetes

Itchy feet and Diabetes often accompany one another. Even though there are plenty of other symptoms that disturb a diabetic, many people will tell you that the itchy feet — particularly at night — are simply intolerable! According to Diabetes.org, as many as 33 percent of diabetics suffer from a skin disorder. What Skin Conditions Cause Itchy Feet In Diabetics? If your feet are itching to high heaven, you may be suffering from one of the following conditions… Bacterial Infections – Usually a bacterial infection of the foot will be evidenced by liquid-filled boils. Inflamed tissue is red, hot, swollen and sometimes itchy. It is especially important that people do their best to avoid a diabetes foot infection, as unchecked infections can lead to amputations. Fungal Infections – Fungal infections like Athlete’s Foot usually starts with an intensely itchy red rash between the toes. Germs can enter cracks in the skin and cause a more widespread infection. Toenail fungus is also common in diabetics, which can be identified by a thickening and yellowing of the nail that results in crumbly edges. Yeast Infections – A common side effect of a yeast infection can be itchy skin — not just in the genital region, but also on the hands, feet, ears and scalp — where candida tends to accumulate. Doctors prescribe antibiotics for this. Peripheral Neuropathy – One of the most common causes of itchy feet for people with diabetes is a dysfunction of the nerves called “peripheral neuropathy.” Numbness, tremors, tingling, pain, pins-and-needles, itching — these are all words used to describe what diabetics face. Some people are prescribed drugs like morphine or oxycodone to deal with these symptoms. Liver Failure – According to Livestrong, “Liver diseases with bi Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Learn The Symptoms Of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy In Phoenixville

Learn The Symptoms Of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy In Phoenixville

If you are suffering from diabetes, your doctor has probably warned you about possible diabetic neuropathy foot problems. After all, if you cannot feel your feet, you are much more likely to suffer an injury that could develop into a serious infection—and possibly cause you to lose the foot. But what you may not know is that there is another type of nerve damage that does not just cause you to lose feeling, but to feel pain and other unpleasant sensations in your feet. This is called painful neuropathy, and can cause as many as 10% of diabetic patients to suffer chronic foot pain issues. There are a number of diabetic neuropathy symptoms. Most often, they are felt in the feet, but you may also experience sensations in the legs and hands, including: Burning sensations on the soles of the feet Freezing or cold sensations in the feet and toes Stabbing pains like knives or glass in the feet Stinging, or a feeling of electric shocks Tingling, such as pins and needles or itching In most cases, the painful symptoms of neuropathy are short lived and last 12 months or less. They are usually experienced during periods of high blood glucose levels or when the blood glucose level fluctuates rapidly. Once the blood sugar has remained stable for a few months, the symptoms will often ease and may even disappear altogether. The causes of painful neuropathy are not fully understood. However, many doctors believe that if symptoms have persisted for more than 12 months, they are unlikely to disappear on their own—even with vigilant blood glucose control. To find out the best course of treatment for your diabetic foot problems, call the trusted Philadelphia podiatrists at HealthMark Foot & Ankle Associates today to set up your first consultation. We are ready to serve you in two locati Continue reading >>

Dry, Itchy Penis A Symptom Of Diabetes?

Dry, Itchy Penis A Symptom Of Diabetes?

A dry, itchy penis can be caused by many different problems, ranging from dry skin to allergies to heart disease. Most cases of penile itching and dryness are easily dealt with and temporary, but men who have chronically dry, itchy skin may need to look deeper for a solution. Ongoing health issues such as psoriasis, eczema and even diabetes can cause these, as well as other, skin issues that may affect the penis. Since psoriasis and eczema are already fairly well-known for causing skin problems, it is worth exploring the diabetes angle a little bit further. Whether men have already been diagnosed with diabetes or they are trying to pinpoint the cause of their symptoms, it is useful to know about how this increasingly common disease can impact penis health. Diabetes is a systemic disease most commonly seen in overweight individuals. It occurs when the body is not able to produce enough insulin or cannot use it properly. Insulin is a hormone that keeps glucose (blood sugar) levels under control. Having high levels of blood sugar for extended periods of time can cause significant damage to all parts of the body, and the problems related to diabetes can be extensive. The skin, including the penile skin, is frequently affected, and men may experience any of the following conditions that present as a dry and/or itchy penis. 1) Thrush. Men with diabetes are especially prone to thrush, a fungal infection caused by the Candida albicans yeast (the same organism responsible for feminine yeast infections). Thrush is characterized by skin that is dry and itchy; deep fissures may also develop, especially in the foreskin in uncircumcised men. Some men may also have swelling and/or a white or yellowish discharge that has a consistency similar to cottage cheese. An over-the-counter anti Continue reading >>

Pruritus Vulvae

Pruritus Vulvae

Most women experience a slight vulval itch now and again. However, pruritus vulvae means the itch is persistent and causes distress. Itchy vulva (pruritus vulvae) is itching of the skin of the vulva. The vulva is the skin outside the vagina, including the lips of the vagina and the skin between the vagina and the anus. Itchy vulva is also called pruritus vulvae. Pruritus is the medical word for itch. What is an itchy vulva? 'Pruritus vulvae' simply means itching of the vulva. The vulva is the area of skin just outside the vagina. Most women experience a slight vulval itch now and again. However, pruritus vulvae means the itch is persistent and causes distress. The itch may be particularly bad at night and may disturb your sleep. About 1 woman in 10 sees a doctor about a persistent itchy vulva at some stage in her life. Vulval itching can affect any woman, at any age. It can lead to scratching and rubbing which can break the skin and can lead to soreness, bleeding and skin infections. What causes an itchy vulva? An itchy vulva (pruritus vulvae) is a symptom, not a condition in itself. It can be caused by many different conditions. Therefore, if you have a persistent itchy vulva, you should see your doctor to find out the cause. Causes of an itchy vulva tend to differ slightly between adults and children. However, they can include the following: Infections For example: Thrush. Threadworms. Scabies. Some sexually transmitted infections, such as trichomoniasis and genital warts. Sensitisation of the vulval skin Sensitivity of the vulval skin is the most common cause of persistent vulval itch. The vulval skin can become sensitive to anything that comes into contact with it, such as: Creams, including treatments for, for example, thrush. Soaps. Perfumes. Deodorants. Excessive Continue reading >>

What Products Minimize Itching In Diabetics?

What Products Minimize Itching In Diabetics?

My wife is a type 2 diabetic, and she deals with a lot of skin itchiness. In fact, I'm convinced that she's going to run into even more medical complications just because she's always scratching itches. What products are out there to help diabetics with itchiness? The best treatment for her skin itching really depends on the cause. Most causes of skin itching are unrelated to diabetes. Allergic reactions can cause itching because of histamine release. Skin infections with fungi or parasites such as scabies can cause severe itching in different parts of the body. These are best treated by treating the cause, but symptomatically can be helped with antihistamines such as Benadryl. With that said diabetes can result in nerve damage which can manifest as pain, burning, and sometimes itching. This nerve damage takes place first in the feet and hands and progresses towards the body. If this is the area where she is itching then the diabetes is likely related. If this is the case, then good blood sugar control is the first step towards relieving her symptoms. In addition medications such as gabapentin (Neurontin) can be very effective at treating this type of discomfort. I suggest that you schedule an appointment for your wife with her primary care physician. He or she can determine what is causing this itching and make sure that no complications such as skin infections have happened because of her scratching. If the itching is not due to diabetes, then your wife may warrant a referral to a dermatologist for further evaluation and treatment. This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advic Continue reading >>

What Causes Itching And Burning In Diabetics?

What Causes Itching And Burning In Diabetics?

Why does diabetes and itching seem to go hand in hand? Very few things are more annoying than feeling itching and burning sensations on your body. While any number of diabetic complications could be the cause of these sensations, the typical causes center on four distinct areas. Itching and burning in diabetics is usually caused by peripheral nerve damage, allergic reactions various skin conditions or fungal infections. Peripheral Nerve Damage First, peripheral nerve damage may be the culprit. This type of neuropathy particularly affects the feet and legs. It has many symptoms including a burning sensation in the lower legs. The usual treatment for this is to maintain proper glucose levels. If the skin is particularly sensitive, a bed cradle can be used at night to lift the sheets off of the bed, avoiding any rubbing or contact with the skin. Allergic Reactions Second, allergic reactions to medication can also cause itching. You can sometimes tell if you are having a reaction if you get a rash after taking medications. Obviously, if you think you think you are experiencing a reaction, please see your doctor. Skin Problems Third, various skin conditions associated with diabetes could be causing the problem. Bacterial infections can cause skin discomfort. Good glucose management and antibiotics are the primary ways of treating bacterial infections. Your doctor should be able to provide a prescription if appropriate. Fungal Infections Fungal infections also cause itchy burning rashes. This infection is yeast-like, causing conditions such as jock itch, athlete’s foot, and vaginal yeast infections. If you have this type of issue, you will need a prescription from your doctor to take care of it. Many times, fungal infections are caused by the candida albicans fungus. These Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Make You Itch?

Does Diabetes Make You Itch?

Diabetes can affect your skin in itchy ways. It can change your nervous system to sense itching you otherwise wouldn’t. How does this happen, and what can you do about it? Itching should not be ignored. It can lead to excessive scratching, which can cause discomfort, pain, and infection. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the higher-than-normal blood sugar levels common in diabetes promote skin infections. The causes can be ordinary fungi, yeast, or bacterial rashes like anyone can get. Some other skin diseases only happen to people with diabetes or happen mostly to people with diabetes. These tend to have long names such as diabetic dermopathy and eruptive xanthomatosis. WebMD says as many as one out of three people with diabetes will have some kind of skin condition. Diabetes increases skin dryness and damages circulation. “Localized itching can be caused by a yeast infection, dry skin, or poor circulation,” says WebMD. “When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet.” Genital itching Diabetes can itch more than your skin. Diabetes.co.uk highlights genital yeast infections as a major problem in diabetes. This is because high glucose levels “provide ideal conditions for naturally present yeast to grow and diminishes the body’s ability to fight infection.” Diabetes can also deposit glucose in the urine, helping yeast to grow. Other causes of genital itching include lice, scabies, herpes, various skin diseases, chemical irritants, and allergies. These can affect anyone, but may be felt more strongly in people with diabetes. According to an article on Everyday Health, “diabetes affects the nervous system and alters the perception of sensation in the body.” A piece by Rachel Nall, RN, BS Continue reading >>

What Causes Genital Itching And How To Treat It Naturally

What Causes Genital Itching And How To Treat It Naturally

Genital itching can occur in both genders and may be a symptom of many issues, one of which can be diabetes. But let us not get ahead of ourselves. It doesn’t strictly have to be an indicator of this disease. It can be caused by many different factors. Here is a list of possible reasons why your nether regions may be causing you trouble. Reasons for Genital Itching Allergic reactions Chemical irritants (such as soaps, fabric softeners, creams, detergents, lubricants, and ointments) Pubic lice, which also go by the name of ‘crabs’, and can reside in one’s pubic hair STDs such as trichomoniasis and genital herpes Vaginal yeast infections Bacterial vaginosis, a disease in your genital regions caused by bacteria Tinea cruris, also called ringworm of the groin, is a skin infection of the fungal variety Scabies – an extremely itchy, contagious skin disease due to tiny mites Vaginal dryness caused by menopause which leads to a drop in one’s estrogen levels Cancer (whether vulval or penile). It’s a rare type of cancer which occurs in the skin or tissues in the genital area of both genders Vaginitis, which represents an inflammation of one’s vaginal tissues Diabetes mellitus Certain skin conditions such as eczema or psoriasis In case you haven’t been informed, you should know that yeast infections, as well as STDs, are contagious. In case your genital itching comes from any allergies or irritations, then getting rid of the allergen or irritant is enough for the itching to subside. But not every cause of genital itching is so easy to treat. Some require much more time and effort, and should never be left untreated as this can only lead to further complications, such as a secondary infection. The Connection to Diabetes Like we stated prior, a genital yeast infect Continue reading >>

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