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What Causes Itching In Diabetics?

Warning Signs And Symptoms Diabetes By Type

Warning Signs And Symptoms Diabetes By Type

The main symptoms of diabetes are increased urination (polyuria), thirst ( polydipsia) and tiredness. Common symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes: Excessive thirst Increased urination (sometimes as often as every hour) Unexpected weight loss Nausea, perhaps vomiting Blurred vision In women, frequent vaginal infections Yeast infections (thrush) Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching skin, especially in the groin or vaginal area. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop quickly, over weeks or sometimes days. Type 2 diabetes often doesn’t cause symptoms and is identified on routine screening. Acanthosis nigricans as a warning sign This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of certain areas of the skin, especially in the skin folds. The skin becomes light brown or brown and is sometimes slightly raised and described as velvety. Most often the condition, which typically looks like a small wart, appears on the sides or back of the neck, the armpits, under the breast, and groin. Occasionally the top of the knuckles will have a particularly unusual appearance. Acanthosis nigricans usually affects people who are very overweight. There is no cure for acanthosis nigricans, but losing weight may improve the condition. Acanthosis nigricans usually precedes diabetes. There are other conditions that are also known to cause acanthosis nigricans, including acromegaly and Cushing syndrome. Acanthosis nigricans is a skin manifestation of insulin resistance in most people. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a condition characterised by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that is first recognised during pregnancy. The condition occurs in approximately 14% of all pregnant women. It is usually diagnosed during routine screening before it causes any symptoms. Seek Continue reading >>

Itchy Feet And Diabetes

Itchy Feet And Diabetes

Itchy feet and Diabetes often accompany one another. Even though there are plenty of other symptoms that disturb a diabetic, many people will tell you that the itchy feet — particularly at night — are simply intolerable! According to Diabetes.org, as many as 33 percent of diabetics suffer from a skin disorder. What Skin Conditions Cause Itchy Feet In Diabetics? If your feet are itching to high heaven, you may be suffering from one of the following conditions… Bacterial Infections – Usually a bacterial infection of the foot will be evidenced by liquid-filled boils. Inflamed tissue is red, hot, swollen and sometimes itchy. It is especially important that people do their best to avoid a diabetes foot infection, as unchecked infections can lead to amputations. Fungal Infections – Fungal infections like Athlete’s Foot usually starts with an intensely itchy red rash between the toes. Germs can enter cracks in the skin and cause a more widespread infection. Toenail fungus is also common in diabetics, which can be identified by a thickening and yellowing of the nail that results in crumbly edges. Yeast Infections – A common side effect of a yeast infection can be itchy skin — not just in the genital region, but also on the hands, feet, ears and scalp — where candida tends to accumulate. Doctors prescribe antibiotics for this. Peripheral Neuropathy – One of the most common causes of itchy feet for people with diabetes is a dysfunction of the nerves called “peripheral neuropathy.” Numbness, tremors, tingling, pain, pins-and-needles, itching — these are all words used to describe what diabetics face. Some people are prescribed drugs like morphine or oxycodone to deal with these symptoms. Liver Failure – According to Livestrong, “Liver diseases with bi Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Welcome To Living Healthy With Diabetes

Welcome To Living Healthy With Diabetes

Diabetes and itching almost always come together, in fact, 33 percent of diabetics will suffer from one skin condition or another associated with this difficult to manage disease. Diabetes is the inability of the body to control its blood sugar levels through insufficient insulin production or the body’s inability to respond to the insulin being produced and is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Causes of Itching The rise in blood sugar levels can cause a number of complications to arise in people diagnosed with the disease and itching is one of the early signs, if a person is at risk for diabetes. The relationship between diabetes and itching can be explained by the rise in blood sugar: Poor circulation – The rise in blood sugar among diabetics causes the blood to turn viscous or thick, and this blood does not flow readily throughout the body. It is described as sluggish blood flow resulting in poor circulation, which contributes to dry, itchy skin. Peripheral neuropathy – Damage to the body’s peripheral nerves causes the sweat glands receptors not to perceive signals from the brain. This keeps the diabetic from sweating that can rob the skin of its natural moisturizer, which results in dry and cracked skin from the absence of sweat. Fungal infections – Glucose is a good medium for growing bacteria and other microorganisms. Candida albicans is a fungus in the body and in the increase in blood sugar causes an overgrowth of the fungus, eventually resulting in a fungal infection that causes itching. Should You Scratch that Itch? Diabetes and itching goes together unless the disease is controlled. In uncontrolled diabetes, the skin will be itchy but it is not recommended for the diabetic to scratch the itch for these reasons: Peripheral neuropathy Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Vaginal Itching?

Does Diabetes Cause Vaginal Itching?

Question Originally asked by Community Member PattysPrch1 Does Diabetes Cause Vaginal Itching? My neighbor told me diabetes caused vaginal itching, and now that I have diabetes I know she’s right! So, why do you get vaginal itching with diabetes, and what do you do to stop it? Any help would be appreciated, thanks. Answer PattysPrch1 Vaginal itching could mean you are getting a yeast infection. Diabetics get yeast infection due to high blood sugars–it’s really common. Your body doesn’t fight the infection as fast as a non-diabetic so you may have to go to the doctor for medication to fix it. I went to the Doctor because of a yeast infection, back in 2004. My NP checked my blood sugar and it was 350. I was diagonosed with diabetes and I have never had a yeast infection since. Once you get your blood sugar under control you shouldn’t see them anymore. Cherise Community Moderator You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cherise Nicole Continue reading >>

Learn The Symptoms Of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy In Phoenixville

Learn The Symptoms Of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy In Phoenixville

If you are suffering from diabetes, your doctor has probably warned you about possible diabetic neuropathy foot problems. After all, if you cannot feel your feet, you are much more likely to suffer an injury that could develop into a serious infection—and possibly cause you to lose the foot. But what you may not know is that there is another type of nerve damage that does not just cause you to lose feeling, but to feel pain and other unpleasant sensations in your feet. This is called painful neuropathy, and can cause as many as 10% of diabetic patients to suffer chronic foot pain issues. There are a number of diabetic neuropathy symptoms. Most often, they are felt in the feet, but you may also experience sensations in the legs and hands, including: Burning sensations on the soles of the feet Freezing or cold sensations in the feet and toes Stabbing pains like knives or glass in the feet Stinging, or a feeling of electric shocks Tingling, such as pins and needles or itching In most cases, the painful symptoms of neuropathy are short lived and last 12 months or less. They are usually experienced during periods of high blood glucose levels or when the blood glucose level fluctuates rapidly. Once the blood sugar has remained stable for a few months, the symptoms will often ease and may even disappear altogether. The causes of painful neuropathy are not fully understood. However, many doctors believe that if symptoms have persisted for more than 12 months, they are unlikely to disappear on their own—even with vigilant blood glucose control. To find out the best course of treatment for your diabetic foot problems, call the trusted Philadelphia podiatrists at HealthMark Foot & Ankle Associates today to set up your first consultation. We are ready to serve you in two locati Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Skin problems are often the first visible signs of diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes can make existing skin problems worse, and also cause new ones. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that affects how your body absorbs glucose (sugar). This happens when the body either rejects insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar level. While it’s most common in adults, some children and adolescents can be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and inactivity. While there is no cure, patients can manage their type 2 diabetes by eating well, exercising, and (in some cases) taking medications recommended by your doctor. Monitoring your blood sugar is also important. Sometimes even maintaining a healthy weight isn’t enough to manage this condition. In some cases, your doctor will determine that medication intervention is needed. Common treatments for type 2 diabetes include: insulin therapy (insulin “shots,” usually reserved for those who don’t do well with oral medications) sulfonylureas (medications that stimulate your pancreas to secrete more insulin) metformin (widely prescribed drug which increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin) DPP-4 inhibitors (medications which reduce blood sugar levels) Causes of Diabetes-Related Skin Problems Long-term type 2 diabetes with hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) tends to reduce blood flow to the skin. It can also cause damage to blood vessels and nerves. Decreased blood circulation can lead to changes in the skin’s collagen. This changes the skin’s texture, appearance, and ability to heal. Damage to the skin cells can Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Lead To Intense Itching

Diabetes Can Lead To Intense Itching

Question: Can intense itching be a side effect for someone with diabetes whose blood sugars are poorly controlled? Answer: Poorly controlled diabetes is one possible cause for unexplained itching. Exactly how diabetes causes itching isn't certain, but suggested causes include diabetic nerve root injury, metabolic abnormalities from widely fluctuating blood sugars, and dry skin. If this is the cause, it should improve with better efforts to lower the blood sugars. That said, there are many other causes for severe itching. Dry skin from eczema is a common cause that's fairly easy to treat with moisturizers and steroid cream/ointment. Cholestatic liver disease with high blood levels of bilirubin is another cause of severe itching. A normal set of liver enzyme tests will rule this out. Either a very slow or a very fast thyroid can cause itching, so be sure to check thyroid function. Severe chronic kidney failure can also cause itching from the buildup of toxins. High levels of circulating blood histamines from a tumor can cause itching, so be sure to check a blood histamine level. Folks who have a disorder called polycythemia vera may experience itching due to high circulating levels of histamine-producing mast cells. Certain cancers such as carcinoid syndrome or Hodgkin's/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma can cause extreme itching, so these need to be considered. Parasitic infections are another possible cause, especially after recent travel to endemic areas. Severe emotional stress/anxiety is one more interesting cause for unexplained itching I've encountered in my practice. Q: My blood pressure averages 120/60. I'm concerned about the bottom reading of 60 being too low. I seem to be rather drained, and wonder if it's because my pressure is too low. Is there any food or vitamin I ca Continue reading >>

What Causes Itching And Burning In Diabetics?

What Causes Itching And Burning In Diabetics?

Why does diabetes and itching seem to go hand in hand? Very few things are more annoying than feeling itching and burning sensations on your body. While any number of diabetic complications could be the cause of these sensations, the typical causes center on four distinct areas. Itching and burning in diabetics is usually caused by peripheral nerve damage, allergic reactions various skin conditions or fungal infections. Peripheral Nerve Damage First, peripheral nerve damage may be the culprit. This type of neuropathy particularly affects the feet and legs. It has many symptoms including a burning sensation in the lower legs. The usual treatment for this is to maintain proper glucose levels. If the skin is particularly sensitive, a bed cradle can be used at night to lift the sheets off of the bed, avoiding any rubbing or contact with the skin. Allergic Reactions Second, allergic reactions to medication can also cause itching. You can sometimes tell if you are having a reaction if you get a rash after taking medications. Obviously, if you think you think you are experiencing a reaction, please see your doctor. Skin Problems Third, various skin conditions associated with diabetes could be causing the problem. Bacterial infections can cause skin discomfort. Good glucose management and antibiotics are the primary ways of treating bacterial infections. Your doctor should be able to provide a prescription if appropriate. Fungal Infections Fungal infections also cause itchy burning rashes. This infection is yeast-like, causing conditions such as jock itch, athlete’s foot, and vaginal yeast infections. If you have this type of issue, you will need a prescription from your doctor to take care of it. Many times, fungal infections are caused by the candida albicans fungus. These Continue reading >>

Itchy Skin May Be A Warning Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

Itchy Skin May Be A Warning Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

It’s winter, and one of the tell-tale signs of the season often emerges as dry and itchy skin. However, did you know that these symptoms can also be warning signs of Type 2 diabetes? It’s true. Pruritus, which simply means “itching,” is a common symptom of diabetes. While it’s always a good idea to keep your skin moisturized, there are common conditions associated with diabetes that may cause your skin to itch, crack, and peel. There are various underlying causes that can lead to diabetic pruritus. Here are three of the most common chronic conditions. Poor circulation. Individuals who experience itching in the feet and lower legs may be experiencing the result of poor circulation. Poor circulation causes narrowing and hardening of the blood vessels, which, in turn, causes noticeable itching on the surface of the skin. To lessen the severity of the itching, consider taking the following action steps: • Eliminate the use of tobacco • Adopt a regular exercise routine • Keep blood glucose levels in check Fungal infections. Fungal infections are common in individuals with diabetes and are treated with medication. Because different fungi respond to different medications, it’s best to discuss the best course of action to take with your medical care provider. Common symptoms of fungal infections include dry, red, and cracking skin, blisters or breaking down of the skin, and itching. Because high glucose levels in the body enhance the growth of these infections, you’ll want to be diligent about keeping your glucose under control to prevent fungal growth on the skin. Also, keeping your skin clean and dry will go a long way in warding off fungal infections. Fungal infections commonly thrive in these areas on the body: • Armpits • Groin area • Between fing Continue reading >>

Pruritus Vulvae

Pruritus Vulvae

Most women experience a slight vulval itch now and again. However, pruritus vulvae means the itch is persistent and causes distress. Itchy vulva (pruritus vulvae) is itching of the skin of the vulva. The vulva is the skin outside the vagina, including the lips of the vagina and the skin between the vagina and the anus. Itchy vulva is also called pruritus vulvae. Pruritus is the medical word for itch. What is an itchy vulva? 'Pruritus vulvae' simply means itching of the vulva. The vulva is the area of skin just outside the vagina. Most women experience a slight vulval itch now and again. However, pruritus vulvae means the itch is persistent and causes distress. The itch may be particularly bad at night and may disturb your sleep. About 1 woman in 10 sees a doctor about a persistent itchy vulva at some stage in her life. Vulval itching can affect any woman, at any age. It can lead to scratching and rubbing which can break the skin and can lead to soreness, bleeding and skin infections. What causes an itchy vulva? An itchy vulva (pruritus vulvae) is a symptom, not a condition in itself. It can be caused by many different conditions. Therefore, if you have a persistent itchy vulva, you should see your doctor to find out the cause. Causes of an itchy vulva tend to differ slightly between adults and children. However, they can include the following: Infections For example: Thrush. Threadworms. Scabies. Some sexually transmitted infections, such as trichomoniasis and genital warts. Sensitisation of the vulval skin Sensitivity of the vulval skin is the most common cause of persistent vulval itch. The vulval skin can become sensitive to anything that comes into contact with it, such as: Creams, including treatments for, for example, thrush. Soaps. Perfumes. Deodorants. Excessive Continue reading >>

What Causes Genital Itching And How To Treat It Naturally

What Causes Genital Itching And How To Treat It Naturally

Genital itching can occur in both genders and may be a symptom of many issues, one of which can be diabetes. But let us not get ahead of ourselves. It doesn’t strictly have to be an indicator of this disease. It can be caused by many different factors. Here is a list of possible reasons why your nether regions may be causing you trouble. Reasons for Genital Itching Allergic reactions Chemical irritants (such as soaps, fabric softeners, creams, detergents, lubricants, and ointments) Pubic lice, which also go by the name of ‘crabs’, and can reside in one’s pubic hair STDs such as trichomoniasis and genital herpes Vaginal yeast infections Bacterial vaginosis, a disease in your genital regions caused by bacteria Tinea cruris, also called ringworm of the groin, is a skin infection of the fungal variety Scabies – an extremely itchy, contagious skin disease due to tiny mites Vaginal dryness caused by menopause which leads to a drop in one’s estrogen levels Cancer (whether vulval or penile). It’s a rare type of cancer which occurs in the skin or tissues in the genital area of both genders Vaginitis, which represents an inflammation of one’s vaginal tissues Diabetes mellitus Certain skin conditions such as eczema or psoriasis In case you haven’t been informed, you should know that yeast infections, as well as STDs, are contagious. In case your genital itching comes from any allergies or irritations, then getting rid of the allergen or irritant is enough for the itching to subside. But not every cause of genital itching is so easy to treat. Some require much more time and effort, and should never be left untreated as this can only lead to further complications, such as a secondary infection. The Connection to Diabetes Like we stated prior, a genital yeast infect Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

The symptoms are not always obvious, and many people could be suffering with the condition for years before they learn they have it. Every week 4,500 people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes across the UK. However, experts warn thousands could be living with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The condition, which can be caused by being overweight and poor diet can cause blindness, limbs to be amputated - every week diabetes causes 150 amputations - and even kidney failure. It has even been linked to a reduce life expectancy if the condition it not managed well. People also need to ensure they look after their feet properly as high levels of blood glucose can cause foot problems. This can stop nerves working so people might not feel when they have cut their feet or burned themselves. The main symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Urinating more often than usual - particularly at night Excessive urination can be triggered by excess glucose in the blood which interferes with the kidney’s ability to concentrate urine. Feeling thirsty Kidneys have to work harder in people with type 2 diabetes. Puldisia is the term given to excessive thirst. Diabetes.co.uk said: “If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.” If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body Feeling tired Feeling tired could be a symptom of many conditions - but it can be caused in people who have low blood sugar. Itching around the penis or vagina Thrush - a yeast infection - tends to affect warm, moist areas of the body such as the vagina, penis, mouth and certain areas Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

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