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What Causes Double Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes Double Diabetes Insulin Resistance

Type 1 Diabetes Double Diabetes Insulin Resistance

Type 1 diabetes double diabetes insulin resistance Type 1 diabetes double diabetes insulin resistance Anyone here who has been type one diabetic for more then 30 years can help me in regards to insulin resistance? As I was hospitalized not to long ago for it. I am a type one with 27 years under my belt. D.D. Family T1 since 1966, pumper since '03, transplant '08 I haven't had an issue, but I know of a couple of long term T1s who have. Maybe Richard will post (he still shows up on occasion). He's had T1 for over 70 years and had some issues with IR along the way. He may have been on metformin at one point, but I'm not 100% sure about that. T1 since 1966, dialysis in 2001, kidney transplant in 02 from my cousin, pumping 03 - 08, pancreas transplant Feb 08 Type 1 for almost 21 years and I have mild resistance and it can be a self defeating cycle. You have resistance, so you take more insulin so gain more weight, so you need more insulin, so gain more weight, etc. The best advice I can give is try to break that cycle and do the things that help with insulin resistance. Low carb and regular exercise are probably the most important (makes you more body more sensitive to insulin) and use drugs as aids l(i.e Victoza and Metformin ) to help jumpstart and in conjunction with that process not in lieu of..... When I was dealing with my IR I used Victoza along with low carb and regular exercise and I was able to reduce my insulin needs by about 40%. "There are lots of things that can kill me, Diabetes will not be one of them" - Promise to myself July 2014 Type 1 since 1997 - Pumping on a Omnipod; Monitoring with a Dexcom G5 HbA1C's: Nothing higher than a 6.4 in 5 years 45 years here. I guess I was "insulin resistant", since I was taking a whole lot of insulin, around 125+ units a d Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Medication: Antidiabetics, Insulins

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Medication: Antidiabetics, Insulins

Aathira R, Jain V. Advances in management of type 1 diabetes mellitus. World J Diabetes. 2014 Oct 15. 5 (5):689-96. [Medline] . [Full Text] . [Guideline] Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes Care. 2010 Jan. 33 Suppl 1:S62-9. [Medline] . [Full Text] . International Expert Committee report on the role of the A1C assay in the diagnosis of diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2009 Jul. 32(7):1327-34. [Medline] . [Full Text] . Vehik K, Beam CA, Mahon JL, et al. Development of Autoantibodies in the TrialNet Natural History Study. Diabetes Care. 2011 Sep. 34(9):1897-1901. [Medline] . [Full Text] . [Guideline] American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes--2011. Diabetes Care. 2011 Jan. 34 Suppl 1:S11-61. [Medline] . [Full Text] . Nainggolan L. Continuous Glucose Monitoring: Navigator Beats Rival Devices. Medscape Medical News. January 14, 2013. Available at . Accessed: January 24, 2013. Damiano ER, El-Khatib FH, Zheng H, Nathan DM, Russell SJ. A Comparative Effectiveness Analysis of Three Continuous Glucose Monitors. Diabetes Care. 2013 Jan 3. [Medline] . Tao B, Pietropaolo M, Atkinson M, Schatz D, Taylor D. Estimating the cost of type 1 diabetes in the U.S.: a propensity score matching method. PLoS One. 2010 Jul 9. 5(7):e11501. [Medline] . [Full Text] . Pilia S, Casini MR, Cambuli VM, et al. Prevalence of Type 1 diabetes autoantibodies (GAD and IA2) in Sardinian children and adolescents with autoimmune thyroiditis. Diabet Med. 2011 Aug. 28(8):896-9. [Medline] . Philippe MF, Benabadji S, Barbot-Trystram L, et al. Pancreatic volume and endocrine and exocrine functions in patients with diabetes. Pancreas. 2011 Apr. 40(3):359-63. [Medline] . Noble JA, Valdes AM. Genetics of the HLA region in the prediction of type 1 diabetes. Curr Diab Rep. 2011 Continue reading >>

Double Diabetes: Is It A Myth Or Does It Exist?

Double Diabetes: Is It A Myth Or Does It Exist?

Usually, when you think of ‘double’ it sounds like a good thing. Double the fun, double the money, double the dessert, etc. However, when you hear ‘double diabetes’ this doesn’t necessarily sound like any fun at all. Most people are not aware that even such a thing exists. But double diabetes is for those special few people that have a combo of both type 1 and type 2 features. When someone who has type 1 diabetes develops insulin resistance, which you traditionally see in type 2 diabetes, this is what is known as double diabetes. It’s important to remember that double diabetes doesn’t take away the seriousness of having type 1 diabetes. In fact, they will always have type 1 diabetes. But some of the effects of having insulin resistance can be reduced with proper treatment. I suggest reading the following pieces: Why Do Type 1’s Develop Insulin Resistance? Why someone’s body responds in the wrong manner to insulin is still a bit of a mystery. Unfortunately, the majority of people believe that those with type 1 diabetes are not insulin resistant because they commonly are not overweight. This is however the furthest from the truth you can get. There are a few factors that increase your risk of developing insulin resistance, even as a type 1 diabetic. These factors include: Being over 40 years’ old Glucose intolerance history Having hypertension or cardiovascular disease Low HDL Cholesterol or High Triglycerides Having PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) Having Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease What Exactly is Double Diabetes? Double Diabetes was first discovered and introduced in 1991. During a research study for those with Type 1 diabetes and a family history of Type 2 diabetes it was shown that these individuals were more likely to become overweight an Continue reading >>

The Causes Of Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes And Prediabetes (video)

The Causes Of Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes And Prediabetes (video)

Most people believe that people with type 1 diabetes are not insulin resistant simply because they are not overweight. This could not be farther from the truth. While insulin resistance affects many overweight individuals, many people with type 1 diabetes remain skinny their entire lives despite a large degree of insulin resistance (1–3). Over the past decade, I have helped many people with type 1 diabetes measure, track and reverse insulin resistance. In practice, 100% of all my clients with type 1 diabetes suffer from insulin resistance despite the assumption that they were insulin sensitive. By measuring their baseline insulin resistance, we were able to identify an impaired ability to utilize glucose as a fuel, and through dedicated diet modification and frequent exercise, some of my clients have reduced their insulin usage by as much as 60%. If you have type 1 diabetes, do not be fooled into thinking that you are insulin sensitive simply because you are skinny. Insulin resistance is a hidden condition, and affects both normal weight and overweight individuals (1–3). What Causes Insulin Resistance? Insulin resistance underlies all forms of diabetes, and is a condition which primarily affects your muscles, liver and adipose tissue. Many people think that diabetes is caused by an excess intake of sugar and candy starting from a young age. While eating artificial sweeteners and drinking soda can certainly increase your risk for the development of insulin resistance and diabetes, in most cases diabetes is caused by excessive FAT intake. The most important thing you can do as a person with diabetes is understand the following: Diabetes is caused by a fat metabolism disorder, which results in a glucose metabolism disorder. At the heart of all forms of diabetes is insu Continue reading >>

Is It Possible For Type 2 Diabetes To Turn Into Type 1?

Is It Possible For Type 2 Diabetes To Turn Into Type 1?

Type 2 diabetes can’t turn into type 1 diabetes, since the two conditions have different causes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It occurs when the insulin-producing islet cells in the pancreas are completely destroyed, so the body can’t produce any insulin. In Type 2 diabetes, the islet cells are still working. However, the body is resistant to insulin. In other words, the body no longer uses insulin efficiently. Type 1 diabetes is far less common than type 2. It used to be called juvenile diabetes because the condition is typically diagnosed in early childhood. Type 2 diabetes is more commonly diagnosed in adults, though we’re now seeing more and more children being diagnosed with this disease. It’s more commonly seen in those who are overweight or obese. It’s possible for someone with type 2 diabetes to be misdiagnosed. They may have many of the symptoms of type 2 diabetes, but actually have another condition that may be more closely related to type 1 diabetes. This condition is called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). Researchers estimate that between 4 and 14 percent of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes might actually have LADA. Many physicians are still unfamiliar with the condition and will assume a person has type 2 diabetes because of their age and symptoms. In general, a misdiagnosis is possible because: both LADA and type 2 diabetes typically develop in adults the initial symptoms of LADA — such as excessive thirst, blurred vision, and high blood sugar — mimic those of type 2 diabetes doctors don’t typically run tests for LADA when diagnosing diabetes initially, the pancreas in people with LADA still produces some insulin diet, exercise, and oral drugs usually used to treat type 2 diabetes work well in people with LADA Continue reading >>

Type 1.5 Diabetes

Type 1.5 Diabetes

A form of diabetes sometimes called “double diabetes,” in which an adult has aspects of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past three decades, diabetes researchers have gradually fine-tuned the classification of different underlying diseases that comprise diabetes. In the early 1970’s, they spoke of “juvenile-onset” and “adult-onset” diabetes to distinguish between two seemingly different forms of the disease based on when they tended to appear; however, sometimes the “juvenile” form showed up in adults. They later coined the terms “insulin-dependent” and “non-insulin-dependent” diabetes to distinguish between the two basic forms of the disease based on how they were treated rather than the age of onset. But this, too, was confusing because some people with non-insulin-dependent diabetes also used insulin. So scientists had to come up with yet another classification system. In the late 1990’s, they began classifying the two major types of diabetes by their underlying metabolic problems and called them Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells (and the resulting production of little or no insulin), and the presence of certain autoantibodies against insulin or other components of the insulin-producing system such as glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), tyrosine phosphatase, and/or islet cells. It often develops in children (although it can occur at any age) and requires insulin treatment for survival. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction, usually develops in adults (although it is now occurring with alarming frequency in children), does not show signs of autoimmune disease, and usually does not require insulin to maintain survival (at l Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Causes Of Double Diabetes

Children With Diabetes - Causes Of Double Diabetes

The causes of double diabetes are not completely known. We do know that one of the important factors is excessive weight gain. Why? Weight gain causes insulin resistance, and that's what seems to push a person with type 1 diabetes into the double diabetes category. A person's family genes are also likely to be a factor. People with type 1 and a family history of type 2 are more likely to develop insulin resistance if they gain excessive weight. A person's ethnic and racial background counts too people of ethnic racial minorities are more likely to develop insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The Accelerator Hypothesis: A New Theory on the Role of Weight in Type 1 Diabetes The overall increase in insulin resistance due to obesity is blurring the lines that usually distinguish type 1diabetes from type 2 diabetes. According to the "accelerator hypothesis" of diabetes development, the increase in the frequency of type 1 diabetes seen in young children is due to excessive weight gain and the development of insulin resistance, a phenomenon we usually associate with type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance puts the beta cells under stress by forcing them to manufacture more and more insulin. Stressed beta cells are more likely to experience autoimmune injury (damage that happens when the body's immune system cells attack other cells), which can lead to these cells being destroyed and to the development of type 1 diabetes in a person who is already genetically at risk. This suggests that weight gain can accelerate the development of type 1 in people who might get it later in life if they had maintained a healthy weight. Obesity and insulin resistance might also partially explain why there is an increase in the total number of cases of type 1 diabetes. It is possible that excess Continue reading >>

'double Diabetes' Poses Double Threat

'double Diabetes' Poses Double Threat

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2005 (HealthDay News) -- It's a scene occurring with increasing frequency in doctors' offices across America: A patient, usually overweight, comes in with all the symptoms of obesity-linked type 2 diabetes. But blood tests reveal antibodies to the pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin -- a sign that the patient also has the rarer type 1 form of the disease. "We call it 'double diabetes,' or hybrid diabetes," said Dr. Francine Kaufman, past president of the American Diabetes Association and head of the Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology at Children's Hospital, Los Angeles. She and other experts warn that a growing number of patients are being spotted with both forms of the disease. In type 1 diabetes, which affects 5 percent of all diabetics, the body's immune system turns against beta cells in the pancreas that produce the insulin needed to regulate blood sugar. Type 1 diabetics typically must take daily insulin via injection to remain healthy. In the much more common, obesity-linked type 2 variety, increasing demand from the body fat's cells causes a gradual shortfall of, and resistance to, insulin. Medication and regular monitoring of blood sugar are essential to keep type 2 patients safe and healthy. Kaufman, a pediatric endocrinologist, said "double diabetes" is a phenomenon that's being increasingly recognized by doctors. In fact, recent reports suggest that up to 30 percent of newly diagnosed diabetes among children involves youngsters with both type 1 and type 2 disease. "They may clinically look like they have type 2 -- be overweight and maybe have a family history of type 2 -- but then they come back positive for [type 1] antibodies," Kaufman said. On the flip side, other young patients may have had type 1 since childhood, become obese Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes: What Is ‘double Diabetes’ And What Are The Risks?

Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes: What Is ‘double Diabetes’ And What Are The Risks?

Go to: Double diabetes The term ‘double diabetes’ was first coined in 1991 based on the observation that patients with type 1 diabetes who had a family history of type 2 diabetes were more likely to be overweight and rarely achieved adequate glycaemic control even with higher insulin doses [1]. The more extensive, or stronger, the family history, the higher the dose the patient received. The authors suggested that this might indicate the presence of increased resistance to insulin-mediated glucose disposal in this subgroup of people with type 1 diabetes and asserted that, over a lifetime, some of these individuals would likely have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at some point, had they not first developed beta cell destruction by an independent pathological process (i.e. type 1 diabetes). At this stage, it is important to differentiate this description of double diabetes, which considers autoimmune diabetes to be an independent process from obesity and insulin resistance, from the accelerator hypothesis [2], which describes triggering of autoimmune diabetes by factors including BMI and insulin resistance. Other studies of people with type 1 diabetes and a family history of type 2 diabetes have supported the notion that this combination might promote both microvascular and macrovascular complications of type 1 diabetes. For example, in a prospective study of 3250 patients with type 1 diabetes recruited from 16 European countries (EURODIAB), it was demonstrated that women with a parental history of type 2 diabetes had a higher risk of developing albuminuria than those without a positive family history (HR 1.36, p = 0.04) [3]. Furthermore, in a cross-sectional study of 658 patients from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) cohort, 112 of who Continue reading >>

The 'double' Whammy: What Is Type 3 Diabetes?

The 'double' Whammy: What Is Type 3 Diabetes?

The 'Double' Whammy: What is Type 3 Diabetes? Being diagnosed with diabetes by your physician is enough of a shocker. Now, some patients are learning that not only do they suffer from one type of diabetes, but two types simultaneously. Indeed, type 3 diabetes – also known as hybrid or double diabetes – is a new and dangerous phenomenon that has many health officials deeply concerned. As we enter National Diabetes Month, learn the signs and symptoms of diabetes as well as how to help loved ones with this disease. What is type 3 diabetes, and how can you prevent it? Read on, and don't forget to take the quiz to test your sugar IQ... There's a new public health threat, and it means business. The phenomenon is known as “double diabetes” or “hybrid diabetes,” and it’s harder to diagnose and significantly more difficult to treat. This new breed of disease is also sometimes referred to as "diabetes 1-1/2 ," or type 3 diabetes. What has been called double diabetes can strike at any age. According to recent reports, physicians are seeing increasing numbers of patients with double diabetes, in which an individual has the symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Treatment is especially difficult in children. Type 1 or insulin-dependent diabetes, which affects 5% of all diabetics, happens when the body's immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. When the body cannot turn blood sugar, or glucose, into energy – either because it does not produce enough insulin or does not use it correctly – diabetes will result. Although it was previously thought that type 1 diabetes only occurs in children, it is now known that it also can develop in adults. However, type 1 is still the rarest form. The majority of diabetics nationwide suffer from type Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes At The Same Time?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes At The Same Time?

One thing I hear occasionally among type 1 diabetics is, “Well, at least I can’t get type 2 diabetes!” This reasoning makes sense if you think only about the two diabetes as two points along a single spectrum, with type 2 diabetes being a metabolic disease that is “the less severe” type 1 diabetes. I felt compelled to answer: Yes, yes you can. You absolutely can. Yes you can have type 1 and type 2 diabetes at the same time. You’re unlikely to get diagnosed with type 2 diabetes if you already have type 1, because it’s hard to measure the difference in blood sugar values, but you can still suffer from both types of diabetes simultaneously. Consider: type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the T cell mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. In other words, no beta cells. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by insulin resistance in many of the cells in the body, and can progress to stress-induced (we think) death of the beta cells. So, if your beta cells are already gone as a result of type 1 diabetes, they can’t die again because of type 2. But you can definitely become insulin resistant, due to obesity, genetic predisposition, and/or hyperinsulinemia. As if type 1 diabetes weren’t hard enough– consider doing it while your body is insulin resistant as well. Ugh. Don’t do it, people– watch your weight, stay active, eat well. Avoid type 2 diabetes, especially if you’re a type 1 diabetic. I am thinking about all of this in the wake of having watched the HBO miniseries/documentary, The Weight of the Nation. I highly recommend it– it was made in conjunction with the NIH, and hits a nice balance of being understandable and compelling, and being scientifically based. Plus, Francis Collins makes seve Continue reading >>

Do You Know The 5 Types Of Diabetes?

Do You Know The 5 Types Of Diabetes?

(BlackDoctor.org) — What is diabetes? Essentially, it’s a disorder where your body has problems producing or effectively using insulin, which can, in turn, cause many other mild to severe health problems. There are several different causes of insulin problems – managing your diabetes will depend on which type you have. Type 1 Diabetes: Little To No Insulin With type 1 diabetes, which used to be called juvenile diabetes, your body does not produce insulin or produces very little. Type 1 diabetes is known as an autoimmune disease because it occurs when your immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in children and young adults and accounts for 5 to 10 percent of diabetes cases in the United States. Symptoms may include thirst, frequent urination, increased hunger, unexplained weight loss, blurry vision, and fatigue. People who have type 1 diabetes need to take insulin injections daily to make up for what their pancreas can’t produce. Type 2 Diabetes: Insulin Resistance Type 2 diabetes, which used to be called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of diabetes cases. While most people who develop type 2 diabetes are older, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children is on the rise. The exact cause of type 2 diabetes is largely unknown, but the disease tends to develop in people who are obese and physically inactive. People who have a family history of diabetes or a personal history of gestational diabetes are also at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In addition, certain groups, particularly African Americans, have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes usually develop gradually, and are similar to Continue reading >>

Double Diabetes

Double Diabetes

Tweet Double diabetes is when someone with type 1 diabetes develops insulin resistance, the key feature of type 2 diabetes. Someone with double diabetes will always have type 1 diabetes present but the effects of insulin resistance can be reduced somewhat. The most common reason for developing insulin resistance is obesity and whilst type 1 diabetes is not itself brought on by obesity. People with type 1 diabetes are able to become obese and suffer from insulin resistance as much as anyone else. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease whereby the body’s immune system attacks and kills off its own insulin producing cells. The autoimmune effect is not prompted by being overweight. Over a period of time, the vast majority, if not all, of insulin producing cells are destroyed. Without being able to produce insulin, blood sugar levels rise and the symptoms of diabetes appear. Type 2 diabetes is closely related to obesity, 85% of cases of type 2 diabetes occur in people who are obese. Although the process is not yet fully understood, it is largely believed that obesity causes the body’s cells to become resistant to insulin. As a result, people with either type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes start to produce more insulin than those without the condition and one of the consequences of this is further weight gain which helps to reinforce the condition. Type 2 diabetes develops gradually, usually over a period of years before symptoms, such as frequent urination, become noticeable. Progression of double diabetes Similar to type 2 diabetes, double diabetes, if not treated appropriately can become more severe over time. If double diabetes is allowed to progress more insulin will need to be injected which promotes further w Continue reading >>

Payperview: Double Diabetes: A Mixture Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Youth - Karger Publishers

Payperview: Double Diabetes: A Mixture Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Youth - Karger Publishers

I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree. The increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D), especially in children <5 years of age reported over the past decade can be attributed to changes in environmental factors, either quantitative or qualitative, rather than to an effect of genetic factors operating in such a short period of time. The notable increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in children and adolescents is very likely the consequence of the increase in obesity and sedentary life style occurring in developed countries. The increase in the number of children and adolescents with a mixture of the two types of diabetes has recently come to light (i.e. subjects who are obese and/or with signs of insulin resistance as well as positive for markers of autoimmunity to cells). Under the current classification, it is difficult to define the type of diabetes affecting these young subjects, being classified as T2D because they are obese and insulin resistant, but also as T1D because of the presence of auto-antibodies to cells. There is no doubt that these subjects show an overlapping diabetes phenotype typical of both T1D and T2D suggesting that the current classification of diabetes should be revised taking into account this new form of diabetes which has called double diabetes or hybrid diabetes. Continue reading >>

Double Diabetes Dr. Kurt's Place

Double Diabetes Dr. Kurt's Place

A few weeks back I had posted a picture of the infamous Unicorn Frappuccino . It was an image that equated the sugar load of the beveragewith eating 3 Snickers bars. I made the comment that if youre as excited about this drink, thenyou should be as excited about diabetes. What ensued was a firestorm that I could have never predicted. I was getting hammered for perpetuating the notion that sugar causes diabetes and the shaming police were flicking on sirens and showing their lights all over the place. I was being accused of perpetuation a stigma, disease shaming, and diet shaming. And it wasnt coming from anyone with type 2 diabetes but those moms and loved ones of people with type 1 diabetes. The momma bears were in full force and after I let the dust settle, I understand why. They are constantly having to explain and defend that their childs condition isnt from bad parenting nor chronic, reckless, lifestyle decisions. Raising3 boys with my wife, I know a mom will blame herself for anything that isnt favorable, even if its out of her control. But where my point was being missed was that even though something isnt your fault, its still your responsibility. And even if your child has type 1 diabetes, that child will have better outcomes by avoiding the things that contribute to type 2 diabetesspecifically a high sugar diet. Regardless of the presentationof Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, theres a common theme, the regulation and utilization of insulin . One doesnt produce insulin, the other, the cells dont listen to insulin well. In either scenario, the less need for insulin, the better the outcomes. If you consume the unicorn, regardless of endogenousinsulin production or exogenousinsulin injection, the high sugar load calls for a higher insulin need. What I want to make cle Continue reading >>

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