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What Can You Educate Your Patient With Diabetes On To Help Prevent Complications?

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes refers to diabetes that is diagnosed during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies, usually in the second half of the pregnancy. It almost always goes away as soon as your baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated during your pregnancy, you may experience some complications. Causes Pregnancy hormones cause the body to be resistant to the action of insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas that helps your body use the fuels supplied by food. The carbohydrates you eat provide your body with a fuel called glucose, the sugar in the blood that nourishes your brain, heart, tissues and muscles. Glucose also is an important fuel for your developing baby. When gestational diabetes occurs, insulin fails to effectively move glucose into the cells that need it. As a result, glucose accumulates in the blood, causing blood sugar levels rise. Diagnosis Gestational diabetes is diagnosed with a blood test. Your blood glucose level is measured after you drink a sweet beverage. If your blood sugar is too high, you have gestational diabetes. Sometimes one test is all that is needed to make a definitive diagnosis. More often, an initial screening test is given and, if needed, a longer evaluation is performed. Gestational diabetes usually does not occur until later in pregnancy, when the placenta is producing more of the hormones that interfere with the mother's insulin. Screening for gestational diabetes usually takes place between weeks 24 to 28. However, women at high risk are usually screened during the first trimester. Risk Factors There are a number of risk factors associated with gestational diabetes, including: Being overweight Giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Having a parent or siblin Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Preventing Complications In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Preventing Complications In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

DIABETES OVERVIEW Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that can lead to complications over time. These complications can include: Coronary heart disease, which can lead to a heart attack Cerebrovascular disease, which can lead to stroke Retinopathy (disease of the eye), which can lead to blindness Nephropathy (disease of the kidney), which can lead to kidney failure and the need for dialysis Neuropathy (disease of the nerves), which can lead to, among other things, ulceration of the foot requiring amputation (see "Patient education: Diabetic neuropathy (Beyond the Basics)") Many of these complications produce no symptoms in the early stages, and most can be prevented or minimized with a combination of regular medical care and blood sugar monitoring. CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS IN DIABETES A number of measures are important to reduce the risk of cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) disease. Quit smoking. Manage high blood pressure with lifestyle modifications and/or medication(s). Have a blood test to measure cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and modify the diet if needed. Some people will also need a medication to lower their low-density lipoprotein (LDL) ("bad cholesterol") or triglycerides. If medication is needed, a statin drug should be included whenever possible. The statin drugs have been shown to decrease the future risk of heart attacks, strokes, and death in people with diabetes who are over age 40 years, even when cholesterol levels are normal. The initiation of statins should be based upon cardiovascular risk rather than an LDL cholesterol level. Statins are recommended for anyone with clinical cardiovascular disease or over age 40 years, regardless of baseline lipid levels. For patients without clinical cardiovascular disease and under age 40 year Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Diabetes, Prevention

Patient Education: Diabetes, Prevention

Young, Smart, Attractive, DIABETIC? Why college students should care about diabetes — and how to prevent it Tell me what diabetes is and what it has to do with me. Diabetes means that your blood glucose (sugar) is too high. The health choices you make as a college student can determine whether or not you will have to deal with serious complications — such as blindness, nerve damage and heart disease — that can come with having diabetes. But no one in my family has ever had it! Did you know that you can develop type 2 diabetes without having any genetic predisposition to it? Recent studies show more and more college-age students starting their after-college lives with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes as a result of poor diet and/or physical fitness while at school. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes/prediabetes include: High Body Mass Index (BMI) Little or no physical activity Family history of diabetes Race/ethnicity (African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian, Pacific Islander) Prediabetes? Never heard of it. Prediabetes means your blood glucose is higher than normal but lower than the diabetes range. It also means you’re at risk for type 2 diabetes; however, you can reduce your risk of getting diabetes and even return to normal blood glucose levels with modest weight loss and moderate physical activity. How would I know if I have diabetes? Some signs of diabetes include being very thirsty or hungry, feeling very tired, blurry vision, tingling in the hands or feet, and sores that are slow to heal. But I don’t feel sick, and my weight is totally fine. Skinny is good, right? Skinny does not always equal healthy. While the association between having a high BMI and diabetes or prediabetes is well-established, weight alone is not the only thing that can Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes Problems

Preventing Diabetes Problems

Diabetes can damage blood vessels and lead to heart disease and stroke. You can do a lot to prevent heart disease and stroke by managing your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels; and by not smoking. Hypoglycemia occurs when your blood glucose drops too low. Certain diabetes medicines make low blood glucose more likely. You can prevent hypoglycemia by following your meal plan and balancing your physical activity, food, and medicines. Testing your blood glucose regularly can also help prevent hypoglycemia. Diabetic neuropathy is nerve damage that can result from diabetes. Different types of nerve damage affect different parts of your body. Managing your diabetes can help prevent nerve damage that affects your feet and limbs, and organs such as your heart. Diabetic kidney disease, also called diabetic nephropathy, is kidney disease caused by diabetes. You can help protect your kidneys by managing your diabetes and meeting your blood pressure goals. Diabetes can cause nerve damage and poor blood flow, which can lead to serious foot problems. Common foot problems, such as a callus, can lead to pain or an infection that makes it hard to walk. Get a foot checkup at each visit with your health care team. Diabetes can damage your eyes and lead to low vision and blindness. The best way to prevent eye disease is to manage your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol; and to not smoke. Also, have a dilated eye exam at least once a year. Diabetes can lead to problems in your mouth, such as infection, gum disease, or dry mouth. To help keep your mouth healthy, manage your blood glucose, brush your teeth twice a day, see your dentist at least once a year, and don’t smoke. Having diabetes can increase your chance of having bladder problems and changes in sexu Continue reading >>

9 Ways To Help Patients With Diabetes In Your Pharmacy

9 Ways To Help Patients With Diabetes In Your Pharmacy

9 ways to help patients with diabetes in your pharmacy Help complex diabetes patients reach their goals by individualizing treatment Nearly 30 million people have diabetes and more than 85 million have prediabetes, but many are unaware of their condition. Early intervention to lower blood glucose levels offers lasting benefits in reducing complications. Pharmacies can offer numerous products and services to help patients with diabetes, including screening, vaccines, resistance bands and footwear. In addition to diabetes education, pharmacists can help patients reach their goals through med sync and Medication Therapy Management (MTM). For patients with diabetes, lowering their A1C levels provides lasting benefits. Pharmacies can help them do that with individualized coaching. Helping patients control their blood glucose levels reduces complications including eye, kidney and nerve disease. Controlling glucose can reduce the long-term risk of stroke and coronary artery disease.1For example, a 1% decrease in A1C levels can reduce microvascular complications by 35%. Less than 60% of patients take advantage of diabetes self-management education (DSME), although most types of insurance cover it when providers meet their standards. One study found just 6.8% of privately insured patients take a diabetes class.2Encourage your patients to speak with an insurance representative to see if a diabetes education course is covered under their plan. Medicare Part B will cover 10 hours of initial training and two hours of follow-up training each year, and most states require private insurers to cover diabetes education, but Medicaid coverage is less widespread.3 Even if your pharmacy doesnt have a formal diabetes education program, through Medication Therapy Management (MTM), medication Continue reading >>

9 Ways To Prevent Type 1 Diabetes Complications

9 Ways To Prevent Type 1 Diabetes Complications

How to Master Type 1 Diabetes Management Having type 1 diabetes puts you at greater risk for a number of health complications including infection, kidney failure, and blindness. But by controlling your blood sugar, you can prevent or delay the onset of many of these complications. Making healthy lifestyle changes, such as eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly, and taking your diabetes medications as prescribed can help you manage your blood sugar. Need a target goal? Your A1C, the blood test that indicates your average blood sugar over a three-month period, is an excellent starting point. "If you keep your A1C under 7, it will help prevent complications," says Sarfraz Zaidi, MD, director of the Jamila Diabetes and Endocrine Medical Center and an endocrinologist at Los Robles Hospital and Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Diabetic Complications

How To Avoid Diabetic Complications

Tweet Long term diabetic complications are the result of one or more parts of your body becoming damaged as a result of diabetes. Long term complications need not be inevitable and research indicates that it is possible to minimise complications or avoid or prevent them altogether. What are the main long term complications? The most common long term complications of diabetes include: Heart disease - known as cardiovascular disease Kidney damage - known as nephropathy Eye damage - known as retinopathy Nerve damage - known as neuropathy Stroke Limb amputations - particularly lower leg amputations How can I prevent these complications? On our complications pages we include statistics about how common complications are. Some of the figures may appear worryingly high. However, the truth is that there are a lot of people who have, for one reason or another, not had the education needed to get their diabetes under control. There are steps we can take to prevent, delay or minimise the effect of complications. These include: Keeping blood sugar under control Getting regular physical activity Eating a healthy diet Attending all your diabetic reviews and screenings Cutting down or avoiding smoking Cutting down or avoiding alcohol Keep your blood sugars under control This one may come across as much easier said than done but any positive change in your control should help to improve your chances of avoiding complications. There are a number of ways that can help with improving blood sugar control. Testing your blood glucose, recording your test results in a blood glucose diary and then actively looking to understand the results tends is an important part of better controlling your diabetes. If you are not prescribed test strips, see our guide on access to testing strips Diabetes ed Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care: 10 Ways To Avoid Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Care: 10 Ways To Avoid Diabetes Complications

Diabetes care is a lifelong responsibility. Consider 10 strategies to prevent diabetes complications. Diabetes is a serious disease. Following your diabetes treatment plan takes round-the-clock commitment. But your efforts are worthwhile. Careful diabetes care can reduce your risk of serious — even life-threatening — complications. Here are 10 ways to take an active role in diabetes care and enjoy a healthier future. 1. Make a commitment to managing your diabetes Members of your diabetes care team — doctor or primary care provider, diabetes nurse educator, and dietitian, for example — can help you learn the basics of diabetes care and offer support along the way. But it's up to you to manage your condition. Learn all you can about diabetes. Make healthy eating and physical activity part of your daily routine. Maintain a healthy weight. Monitor your blood sugar level, and follow your doctor's instructions for managing your blood sugar level. Ask your diabetes treatment team for help when you need it. 2. Don't smoke Smoking increases your risk of various diabetes complications, including: Reduced blood flow in the legs and feet, which can lead to infections, ulcers and possible removal of a body part by surgery (amputation) Heart disease Stroke Eye disease, which can lead to blindness Nerve damage Kidney disease Talk to your doctor about ways to help you stop smoking or using other types of tobacco. 3. Keep your blood pressure and cholesterol under control Like diabetes, high blood pressure can damage your blood vessels. High cholesterol is a concern, too, since the damage is often worse and more rapid when you have diabetes. When these conditions team up, they can lead to a heart attack, stroke or other life-threatening conditions. Eating a healthy, reduced-fat d Continue reading >>

Uchealth Diabetes And Medical Nutrition Therapy - Greeley

Uchealth Diabetes And Medical Nutrition Therapy - Greeley

Individualized medical nutrition therapy for other medical conditions, including food allergies, celiac disease, high cholesterol, and other diagnoses with diet-related concerns Education to help you avoid complications Pre-diabetes. If you have pre-diabetes, we offer a one-time group class with hands on activities to learn more about diet and exercise to stay healthy and to prevent your pre-diabetes from progressing to Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes. For people with Type 2 diabetes, our program consists of approximately one hour of individual assessment, six hours of classroom instruction, plus one hour of individual follow-up with a registered nurse and one hour of individual follow-up with a registered dietitian. If you cannot attend classes, private instruction is available with the registered nurse and registered dietitian. Type 1 diabetes. For children and adults with Type 1 diabetes, our program consists of individual education; the time required will vary from person to person. Gestational diabetes. For women with gestational diabetes, our program usually consists of individual education and usually includes three visits: One with a registered nurse and two with a registered dietitian. The Nutrition Education Services offers state of the art educational programs to help children and adults learn everyday lifestyle skills regarding nutrition. We can show you how to follow a diet that will help you to obtain optimal nutrition, improve your health and exceed your diet and nutrition goals. Our nutrition education programs are comprehensive, individualized, research-based programs serving northern Colorado and neighboring communities. We have been awarded recognition by the American Diabetes Association in accordance with the National Standards for Diabetes Patien Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Complications From Type 1 Diabetes

How To Avoid Complications From Type 1 Diabetes

Having type 1 diabetes means your body doesn’t make insulin. This hormone moves sugar (glucose) from your bloodstream into your cells, where it’s used for energy. Without insulin, too much sugar builds up in your blood. That can damage your nerves and blood vessels, leading to serious health problems. When you don't manage your diabetes and control your blood sugar, your whole body can pay the price. Some of the most common complications are: Kidney disease (nephropathy) Nerve disease (neuropathy) Foot problems, including ulcers Eye disease (retinopathy) Skin infections Gum disease (inflammation and infection) You can’t completely erase your chances of developing these conditions, but you can lower the odds. High blood sugar levels can cause real damage to your body. That's why it’s important to keep your numbers in check every day. Ask your doctor about getting an A1c test. This tracks your average blood sugar over a period of a few months. It gives you a better, bigger picture of how well you’re managing your diabetes. You're much more likely to have a heart attack or stroke than people without diabetes are, but you can lower your risk. Keep your blood pressure and cholesterol in the healthy range. High numbers for both are common with diabetes, so remember to get them checked. Make smart food choices to help manage your blood sugar levels and keep your heart and kidneys healthy. Fill up on produce, fiber, and good fats. Avoid foods high in saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium. Exercise can lower your blood sugar level and your risk for all sorts of problems, like heart disease and stroke. It’s also good for your blood pressure and cholesterol. Talk with your doctor before you get started, though. They might warn you against some workouts with high-impac Continue reading >>

6 Tips For Avoiding Complications From Diabetes

6 Tips For Avoiding Complications From Diabetes

A diagnosis of diabetes does not always mean a lifetime of complications. By devising a plan of action for your diabetes management, you’ll reduce many of the risks associated with having type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Take control of blood glucose. This is your first line of defense against diabetes complications. By maintaining tight control over your blood glucose, you may minimize the damaging effects of unpredictable glucose levels on your body. You’ll also be lowering your A1C level, a test doctors use to determine how well diabetes is being controlled. Aim for an A1C reading of less than 7% . Watch your cholesterol. Total cholesterol levels should generally be 200 mg/dl, but discuss personal goals with your doctor. Watch out for LDL and HDL cholesterol levels, too—LDL can clog the walls of arteries, so keep it under 70 mg/dl to avoid problems. In addition, HDL cholesterol should be greater than 40 mg/dl for men, and 50 mg/dl for women. Triglycerides, a type of fat, should also be under 150 mg/dl. Keep blood pressure in check. Blood pressure readings measure the pressure against the walls of your blood vessels. High blood pressure is more common in people with diabetes, and increases your risk of stroke, heart attack, kidney, and eye diseases. Aim for a reading of 130/80 or lower. Don’t forget your kidneys. Kidneys are the organs that make sure the fluids in your body are balanced and processed properly. When you have diabetes, your kidneys can become compromised due to poorly controlled blood glucose and high blood pressure, so be certain to have a microalbumin test at least once per year, with a goal of less than 30 micrograms per milligram creatinine. Look out for your eyes. High blood glucose can cause serious vision problems. If you have diabetes, it is c Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes Self-management Education?

What Is Diabetes Self-management Education?

Diabetes self-management education helps people to stay healthy and prevent costly complications, yet very few people with diabetes attend a course. Diabetes UK's Taking Control campaign aims to increase the provision and uptake of diabetes self-management education, so that everyone with diabetes has the skills and confidence to take control of their condition. This page gives healthcare professionals and local decision makers more information about patient education options. It includes resources to use with your patients and advice on improving uptake. People learn about their condition in different ways. A useful framework for understanding diabetes education, broadly based on a model used in Scotland, is in three levels: Level three: Structured education that meets nationally-agreed criteria (defined byNICE/SIGN), including an evidence-based curriculum, quality assurance of teaching standards and regular audit. Level two: Ongoing learning that may be quite informal, perhaps through a peer group. Level one: Information and one-to-one advice. Level three education: what is the evidence base? Diabetes education courses, often known as structured education, improve key outcomes, reduce the onset of complications and are cost effective or even cost saving. For a summary of the published evidence on structured education download Diabetes UK's reportDiabetes Education: the big missed opportunity in diabetes care (PDF, 285KB). Level three education: how to improve uptake and quality A short guide from Diabetes UK, including what your patients need to know about diabetes education and tips to improve attendance (see also key downloads).A short guide from Diabetes UK, including what your patients need to know about diabetes education and tips to improve attendance (see also Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Complications

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body functions, such as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk for heart disease and bone and joint disorders. Other long-term complications of diabetes include skin problems, digestive problems, sexual dysfunction, and problems with your teeth and gums. Very high or very low blood sugar levels can also lead to emergencies in people with diabetes. The cause can be an underlying infection, certain medicines, or even the medicines you take to control your diabetes. If you feel nauseated, sluggish or shaky, seek emergency care. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Diabetes Overview

Diabetes Overview

Diabetes is a common group of chronic metabolic diseases that cause high blood sugar (glucose) levels in the body due to defects in insulin production and/or function. Insulin is a hormone released by the pancreas when we eat food. Insulin allows sugar to go from the blood into the cells. If the cells of the body are not using insulin well, or if the body is unable to make any or enough insulin, sugar builds up in the blood. Symptoms include excessive thirst, hunger, and urination; fatigue; slow-healing sores or cuts; and blurry vision. If diabetes develops quickly, as happens with type 1 diabetes, people may also experience quick weight loss. If diabetes develops slowly, as in type 2 diabetes, people may not be diagnosed until symptoms of longer-term problems appear, such as a heart attack or pain, numbness, and tingling in the feet. Long-term complications of diabetes can include kidney failure, nerve damage, and blindness. Diabetes is categorized into categories: Type 1 Diabetes This type of diabetes is categorized as an autoimmune disease and occurs when the body’s misdirected immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Although genetic or environmental triggers are suspected, the exact cause of type 1 diabetes is not completely understood. Type 1 accounts for only five to 10 percent of diabetes cases in the United States, and while it can occur at any age, most patients are diagnosed as children or young adults. People with type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to manage their condition. Type 2 Diabetes This type of diabetes most often develops gradually with age and is characterized by insulin resistance in the body. For reasons not yet totally understood, the cells of the body stop being able to use insulin effectively. Be Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Preventing Complications

Diabetes: Preventing Complications

Diabetes complications can be divided into two types: acute (sudden) and chronic (long-term). This article discusses these complications and strategies to prevent the complications from occurring in the first place. Acute complications Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic syndrome (HHNS) Acute complications of diabetes can occur at any time in the course of the disease. Chronic complications Cardiovascular: Heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke Eye: Diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma Nerve damage: Neuropathy Kidney damage: Nephropathy Chronic complications are responsible for most illness and death associated with diabetes. Chronic complications usually appear after several years of elevated blood sugars (hyperglycemia). Since patients with Type 2 diabetes may have elevated blood sugars for several years before being diagnosed, these patients may have signs of complications at the time of diagnosis. Basic principles of prevention of diabetes complications: Take your medications (pills and/or insulin) as prescribed by your doctor. Monitor your blood sugars closely. Follow a sensible diet. Do not skip meals. Exercise regularly. See your doctor regularly to monitor for complications. Results from untreated hyperglycemia. Blood sugars typically range from 300 to 600. Occurs mostly in patients with Type 1 diabetes (uncommon in Type 2). Occurs due to a lack of insulin. Body breaks down its own fat for energy, and ketones appear in the urine and blood. Develops over several hours. Can cause coma and even death. Typically requires hospitalization. Nausea, vomiting Abdominal pain Drowsiness, lethargy (fatigue) Deep, rapid breathing Increased thirst Fruity-smelling breath Dehydration Inadequate insulin administration (not getting Continue reading >>

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