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What Can You Eat When You Are Glucose Intolerant

Planning Detailed Menus For Glucose Intolerant Folks, I.e.,me

Planning Detailed Menus For Glucose Intolerant Folks, I.e.,me

Planning detailed menus for glucose intolerant folks, i.e.,me I have impaired glucose tolerance , which is a step below gestational diabetes. The pregnancy hormones in my body are causing my insulin to not process sugar as well as it usually would. Left unchecked, and by left unchecked I mean if I continued my ramen-eating habits as they were, I could very possibly develop gestational diabetes, which would pose some mild-to-serious problems for myself and the baby (fat baby, hard labor/delivery, future risk of diabetes, post-birth dangerously low blood sugar for baby, among others). While some health care providers simply advise diet modification for women who have IGT, my health care provider deals with it aggressively by putting me into the same type of lifestyle program that I would be in if I had gestational diabetes, minus any medication or insulin shots. The program involves: Testing my blood sugar (yes, poking myself with a small needle gun) four times a day once when I first wake up (between 8-10 hours since I last ate), then once an hour after breakfast, lunch, and dinner Meeting with a dietitian to learn the types of foods I can eat and cant eat, and how much I should eat at a time Planning very detailed menus or at least keeping track of what you eat to try to balance the appropriate amounts of starch, protein, fat, milk, fruits, and veggies Phoning or emailing blood sugar results for accountability and for the dietitian and nurse to make sure things are going well As someone who already tries (but is not always successful) to eat according to the food pyramid guidelines, Im familiar with the concepts of serving sizes and food portions. The food categories for this are a bit different, however, based on the amounts of carbohydrates in the food. Some of the m Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance Foods To Eat & Avoid - Gestational Diabetes Menu

Glucose Intolerance Foods To Eat & Avoid - Gestational Diabetes Menu

Gestational Diabetes & Glucose Intolerance Foods Menu Since diabetes is a condition where ones blood sugars levels can become dangerously high, then one needs to find and consume foods that can effectively control these effects. Controlling the fluctuations of blood sugar can be controlled through foods and at times with medication. Only certain foods are allowed that are safe and effective as well as nutritious. Once again the goal is to allow you to live a productive and healthy life through the proper utilization of foods. The diet is usually extremely effective and the best option to control your gestational diabetes or glucose intolerance symptoms. If one sticks to the menu and eats the proper foods serious health issues can and usually are averted. The basic guideline menu to the foods you can eat are broken down into several categories. HIGH FIBER FOODS Probably the best choice for glucose intolerant individuals, especially water soluble fiber sources. This is due to the fact that these fiber foods slow down the rate of carbohydrate absorption into your system. Items such as fruits, oat bran, beans, seeds and nuts are excellent choices. Also, vegetables such as tomatoes, broccoli, spinach, cabbage and cauliflower and other leafy vegetables should be on top of your foods list. HIGH PROTEIN FOODS Also a significant menu item that are not only essential for your daily intake but help control gestational diabetes and glucose intolerance symptoms. It does not have to be red meats, as fish and other legumes provide a great source of proteins in your diet. You will also be getting your essential vitamins. CARBOHYDRATES All diets require some amount of carbs to function properly throughout the day. However, for glucose intolerance menus, you need to consume low to moder Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance.....help With Diet Needed.?

Glucose Intolerance.....help With Diet Needed.?

Glucose intolerance.....help with diet needed.? At last a reason why I've felt so unwell for the last month...I've got my blood results that show I have glucose intolerance....this being coeliac has a lot to answer for!!!! As my diet is no processed foods....what do I have to change do I go on a low gi diet? I've been told to improve my diet...but how? I only eat white meat, veg and fruit and some oily fish...and the old slice of gf bread.... Janie, I am sorry that you have now got an extra problem to deal with. I am not sure what I am going to say will help you because I am in a similar position except I am not having a glucose tolerance test because the treatment is, according to my GP, change of diet and lifestyle changes. As I already eat healthy food and exercise 30 mins everyday I didn't see the point. I am already seeing a dietician who has told me to lose weight. I eat the same sort of stuff as you minus the gf bread and sent me away with several leaflets on lifestyle changing advice, how to avoid stuffing yourself with the wrong food and how to monitor times when you comfort eat etc etc. All very patronising and no help whatsoever. Did you explain to whoever told you to improve your diet that you already ate a healthy diet? If so what did they say? Given my experience with a dietician I am loath to suggest you ask for referral to a dietician as I think they may well give you prescriptive advice. Undoubtedly some people on this site have had a good experience with dieticians and indeed I found FODMAPs advice very good. But I am sure there is someone out there who can think outside the box and give you professional advice taking into account what you are eating now and how to address your glucose intolerance. A friend of mine has been diagnosed with glucose into Continue reading >>

List Of Foods To Avoid With A Gluten Intolerance

List Of Foods To Avoid With A Gluten Intolerance

Eating at restaurants can be particularly challenging if you have a gluten intolerance, but this doesnt mean you cant ever dine out. You should be able to dodge the gluten bullet if you stick with the same types of items you eat at home, such as grilled meats and steamed vegetables. Foods to avoid in restaurants include fried foods, certain sauces, or anything that has been fried in the same pan with a gluten-containing food. Celiac disease requires extra caution when eating out. Make sure that dietary restrictions are communicated to the chef in advance. Certain restaurants are almost certainly out of question for those on a gluten-free diet, including fast food restaurants, buffets, salad bars, and most bakeries. On the flipside, some establishments, such as vegetarian restaurants, cater to the gluten-free diet. Some restaurants also have dedicated gluten-free prep and cook areas, but calling ahead to confirm is always a good idea. If you have celiac disease, being gluten-free is essential for your health. A gluten-free diet may seem too challenging to deal with, but with time and a bit of effort it can become second nature. If you can, start off gradually, so you can get used to going gluten-free. For example, you might try one completely gluten-free meal per day and gradually add more meals until gluten is completely out of your diet. Also, a gluten-free diet is easier if you shop at stores and eat at restaurants that cater to your dietary needs. If you want to guarantee that your food is gluten-free, cooking from scratch is the easiest way to avoid gluten. Discuss any specific dietary considerations with a doctor or dietitian. Healthline and our partners may receive a portion of revenues if you make a purchase using a link above. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes, Glucose Intolerance: Meal Plans To Prevent Diabetes

Prediabetes, Glucose Intolerance: Meal Plans To Prevent Diabetes

When I started using your meal plans, I was taking 2 tablets of Metformin (500 mg) per day and I weighed 220 pounds (100 kg). Six weeks later, after scrupulously following your meal plans and cooking them myself, I now weigh 20 pounds (9 kg) less. I checked my blood glucose 4 times a day and stopped metformin after losing 12 pounds (5 kg). I still check my blood glucose as often and I stand by the standards of the Canadian Diabetes Association. In a month, I will have an HbAc and a lipidogram. I cannot wait to see if I managed to curb "metabolic syndrome". I am an ophthalmologist, and I know all too well the complications of diabetes. I am worried about treatments that over-medicate. Congratulations for your beautiful work! "Its now a well-documented fact that we can reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease by about 80% if we adopt healthy lifestyle habits [...] And its also equally well known that diet modification is the most difficult challenge [...] SOS Cuisine is a tool of the highest quality to help you adopt and maintain a Mediterranean diet. The SOS Cuisine website is very professionally designed and it is convenient to use. We recommend the SOS Cuisine services to all our patients and everyone who wishes to improve their diet." Cardiologist, Director of Prevention (Montreal Heart Institute), Professor (Department of Medicine, University of Montreal) Subscribe to this meal plan for as little as $9.95/month! We have so much confidence in its effectiveness, that well reimburse you in the first 7 days if you arent entirely satisfied! Our Prediabetes Meal Plan comply fully with the recommendations of the experts in the field, the main ones being the following: Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance

Glucose Intolerance

Tweet Glucose intolerance is term for metabolic conditions which result in high blood glucose levels. Pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance are all conditions which fall under the term glucose intolerant. Glucose intolerance is defined by the World Health Organisation as: A blood sugar level of 6.0 mmol/l or above whilst fasting A blood glucose level of over 7.8 mmol/l 2 hours after consuming 75g of glucose The figures above are based on the assumption that people are not taking blood glucose lowering medication. The symptoms of glucose intolerance may not be so easy to spot. The symptoms may include: Feeling thirsty Being tired or lethargic Needing to urinate more than usual Itchiness around the genitals People with impaired glucose tolerance are more likely to notice symptoms after meals. Whereas people with impaired fasting glucose will notice the symptoms through other parts of the day including during the night. Glucose intolerance will often be diagnosed by a fasting plasma glucose test or by a glucose tolerance test. A plasma glucose test is when a blood sample is taken, usually from your arm, and the blood glucose levels measured. A glucose tolerance test involves taking a set amount of glucose orally, usually 75g of glucose, and then taking your blood glucose levels over regular periods of time over the next few hours. Glucose intolerance can be treated through diet and lifestyle changes or with assistance from anti-diabetic medication, such as tablets and/or insulin. Your doctor will measure your long term blood glucose control via an HbA1c test. Your doctor may also prescribe you with blood glucose testing supplies to allow you to make diet choices and to indentify and prevent high or low blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance Eating Plan For Managing Blood Sugar And Avoiding The Complications Of Unstable Blood Glucose Levels

Glucose Intolerance Eating Plan For Managing Blood Sugar And Avoiding The Complications Of Unstable Blood Glucose Levels

written by: weborglodge edited by: Diana Cooper updated: 10/22/2010 Following a glucose intolerance eating plan will help you manage your diet to avoid spikes and dips in your blood sugar. Managing your blood glucose levels is essential for living with diabetes. Fortunately, lifestyle changes can effectively help you live with your condition. One of the best coping mechanisms you can follow if you are glucose sensitive is to avoid the foods which cause your blood sugar to become unstable. These foods and beverages will include things which have a high glycemic index (GI). GI is a measure of the effect of certain foods based on how they affect blood sugar. Some carbohydrates such as certain starches like potatoes and rice can cause you glucose levels to spike. When your blood sugar drops, you may experience symptoms of hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. You may sweat profusely or feel anxious or weak. The goal of your glucose intolerance eating plan is to avoid these extremes in blood sugar. Other things can also impact your blood sugar. Alcoholic beverages or drinks containing caffeine can affect your glucose levels. These beverages can worsen your symptoms, increasing your level of intolerance. Several things can cause glucose intolerance in addition to diet. Your diabetes medication may work too well, causing your blood sugar to drop too quickly. Biological conditions may affect your body's ability to release stored sugar. Enzyme deficiencies may also play a role, necessitating changes in your diet. Just as important as the foods you avoid is the timing of your meals or snacks. Your glucose intolerance eating plan will include frequent meals and snacks throughout your day to keep your blood sugar stable. Depending upon your symptoms, you may include snacks before you g Continue reading >>

My Doctor Has Told Me I Have Impaired Glucose Tolerance, What Should I Do?

My Doctor Has Told Me I Have Impaired Glucose Tolerance, What Should I Do?

My doctor has told me I have impaired glucose tolerance, what should I do? If you have been diagnosed with Impaired Glucose Tolerance (commonly known as pre-diabetes) you are at much greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Following a healthy lifestyle can help to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes . If you are overweight , losing some weight (even just 5-7 percent of your current body weight) is important. This reduces stress on the body and can help make all body systems work more efficiently. To help with weight loss, try eating smaller portion sizes andbeing more physically active, and eating food and drink lower in kilojoules. Cooking more meals at home can also help you manage your weight better because you are in control of all of the ingredients. Healthy eating is important. Follow the Australian Dietary Guidelines and include low glycaemic index foods in your eating plan. Getting involved in moderate exercise for 30 minutes a day, on most or every day of the week will also help. An Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD) can help you develop a healthy eating plan that suits your individual lifestyle, maximising the variety of foods you are able to eat. Continue reading >>

What Does Glucose Intolerance Mean? Prediabetes? Type 2 Diabetes?

What Does Glucose Intolerance Mean? Prediabetes? Type 2 Diabetes?

What Does Glucose Intolerance Mean? Prediabetes? Type 2 Diabetes? You just found out you have Glucose Intolerance. What Does Glucose Intolerance Mean? Does this mean you have Prediabetes or even Type 2 Diabetes?Read on to find out including test levels for both Prediabetes & Type 2and how to know if you should be tested Glucose Intoleranceis higher than normal blood sugar levels, also known ashyperglycemia.Normally sugar is taken from your blood and sent to your cellswith Glucose Intolerance too much sugar stays in your blood causing your blood vessels to become inflamed. This problem is very serious as glucose intolerance can contribute to or increase your risk for: Fasting Blood Glucose Test (blood test after fasting) Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (drinking the sugary liquid) Hemoglobin A1C Test (blood test that measures how much your red blood cells are coated with sugar, no fasting necessary) Above normal levels mean you have Glucose Intolerance which most people call Prediabetes or Type 2 Diabetes depending on your test results. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test: 140 mg/dl 199 mg/dl Type 2 Diabetes(U.S. testing guidelines) Fasting Blood Glucose: 126 mg/dl or higher Oral Glucose Tolerance Test: 200 mg/dl or higher Do You Need To Be Tested for Glucose Intolerance? Obviously, you cant take these tests without a doctors permission . If you think you might have Prediabetes or even Type 2 Diabetesask to be tested! Knowing where you stand makes all the difference. You cant fix something if you dont know its broken. If you have any of the below, ask to be test right away for Glucose Intolerance! Tingling Or Numbness In Your Fingers, Hands Or Feet Continue reading >>

If I Have This Glucose Intolerance, What Can I Eat

If I Have This Glucose Intolerance, What Can I Eat

If I Have This Glucose Intolerance, What Can I Eat Originally asked by Community Member Jennifer If I Have This Glucose Intolerance, What Can I Eat If I am glucose intolerant, how much sugar can I eat or do I need to cut it out entirely? Also, what is an acceptable level of salt intake if my blood pressure is elevated? Hello! Carbohydrates is what you have to pay attention too. Click here , it will take you to our diabetic diet section. You will learn about carb counting, meal exchange and how to manage your weight. There is one thing I learned about being a diabetic, moderation is the key. Dont quote me on this but the salt intake I was told should be about 1,800 grams a sodium per day. If you think about it, thats not much. Talk to your Physician or nutritionist, they will be able to tell you what the recommended amount of sodium should be. If you have any more questions, let me know. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

10 Signs You're Gluten Intolerant

10 Signs You're Gluten Intolerant

More than 55 diseases have been linked to gluten, the protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. It's estimated that 99% of the people who have either gluten intolerance or celiac disease are never diagnosed. It is also estimated that as much as 15% of the US population is gluten intolerant. Could you be one of them? 1. Digestive issues such as gas, bloating, diarrhea and even constipation. I see the constipation particularly in children after eating gluten. 2. Keratosis Pilaris, (also known as 'chicken skin' on the back of your arms). This tends be as a result of a fatty acid deficiency and vitamin A deficiency secondary to fat-malabsorption caused by gluten damaging the gut. 3. Fatigue, brain fog or feeling tired after eating a meal that contains gluten. 4. Diagnosis of an autoimmune disease such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Rheumatoid arthritis, Ulcerative colitis, Lupus, Psoriasis, Scleroderma or Multiple sclerosis. 5. Neurologic symptoms such as dizziness or feeling of being off balance. 6. Hormone imbalances such as PMS, PCOS or unexplained infertility. 7. Migraine headaches. 8. Diagnosis of chronic fatigue or fibromyalgia. These diagnoses simply indicate your conventional doctor cannot pin point the cause of your fatigue or pain. 9. Inflammation, swelling or pain in your joints such as fingers, knees or hips. 10. Mood issues such as anxiety, depression, mood swings and ADD. I have found the single best ways to determine if you have an issue with gluten is to do an elimination diet and take it out of your diet for at least 2 to 3 weeks and then reintroduce it. Please note that gluten is a very large protein and it can take months and even years to clear from your system so the longer you can eliminate it from your diet before reintroducing it, the better. The best ad Continue reading >>

Daily Diet For Glucose Intolerance

Daily Diet For Glucose Intolerance

Diabetic testing blood sugar.Photo Credit: Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images Michelle Cimino is a writer of nutrition- and food-related articles. She authors a popular food blog and holds a Master of Science in nutrition and public health from Columbia University. Glucose intolerance is a medical condition that predisposes you to developing diabetes in the future. But this does not mean that diabetes is definite. Simple dietary changes that maintain proper blood sugar control can help you avoid a lifetime of blood sugar monitoring and diabetic complications. Glucose is a simple sugar.Photo Credit: peredniankina/iStock/Getty Images Glucose is a simple sugar that acts as the primary fuel source for your body. Without glucose, your body is forced to utilize muscle and fat instead. While that may seem like an instant weight loss strategy, this alternate energy producing pathway actually results in the accumulation of acidic ketones from the breakdown of fat. When these ketones become too abundant in your blood, the body reacts by shutting down into a coma. For optimal health and proper function, your body must utilize glucose to meet its energy needs. Blood sugar reading.Photo Credit: Tolga Sipahi/iStock/Getty Images Glucose intolerance or impaired glucose tolerance is a pre-diabetic condition that makes it difficult for your body's cells to fully and efficiently utilize glucose as a fuel. This condition predisposes individuals to developing Type 2 diabetes because it results in hyperglycemia or an abnormal accumulation of glucose in the blood. Controlling your blood glucose levels by preventing high blood sugars and keeping them within the normal range can reduce your risk of developing diabetes if you have been diagnosed with glucose intolerance. Sweet potatoes.Photo Cred Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance Diet

Glucose Intolerance Diet

When a person has been identified to be glucose intolerant, it is important to follow glucose intolerance diet. The diet will make sure that the condition does not blow up into full-fledged diabetes. Scroll down to know the changes, you will have to make to your diet. Glucose intolerance is a kind of digestive disorder. In this condition, the body finds it difficult to digest sugar from food items like carbohydrates and sweet meats. If the condition is not controlled, it can eventually give rise to insulin resistance and/or diabetes, however not necessarily always so. Over a period of time, the body's normal response to insulin in the body decreases. This condition is known as insulin resistance. Glucose intolerance symptoms include constant feeling of thirst, excessive hunger, fatigue, etc. If any of the symptoms are observed, it is important to have oneself checked for the same. At the same time, the diet will have to be modified and one should start following diet for glucose intolerance. With simple dietary changes and keeping blood sugar under control will ensure one is able to keep diabetes at bay. Blood sugar is created by breaking down carbohydrates. In case of glucose intolerance, the body is not able to make use of the energy efficiently, which causes the blood sugar levels in the body to go up. Hence, it is important to make sure that the person's diet has glucose intolerant foods. It is a well-known fact that fruits and vegetables are rich in dietary fiber. They help to keep blood sugar levels under control. Along with fruits and vegetables, food high in fiber include nuts, beans, peas, lentils, wheat bran, etc., should also be a part of ones diet to counter glucose intolerance. Fishes like tuna, cod, halibut, etc., are low on saturated fat and cholesterol, Continue reading >>

9 Symptoms Of Glucose Intolerance You Should Be Aware Of

9 Symptoms Of Glucose Intolerance You Should Be Aware Of

Could you be glucose intolerant? You’ll be surprised at some people who are without even realizing it. They suffer the common symptoms without ever thinking about them, believing them to be normal parts of life. It’s only when they suffer a major health problem that they realize those symptoms have never been good. You need to put your health first. It’s essential that you look out for common symptoms that indicate there is a major problem. These symptoms can be minor at first, but they will get worse over time. When it comes to glucose intolerance, you want to be aware of the following nine symptoms. Seek medical attention if you do have them. Glucose Intolerance Is Known as Prediabetes Most people right now will wonder what glucose intolerance is. Your body naturally creates this, so how could you possibly be intolerant to it? The medical term is impaired glucose intolerance (IGT) or prediabetes. It’s a term given to individuals who are at a higher than normal risk of developing diabetes at some point, especially if they continue with the current lifestyle that they have. This isn’t just about your diet, though. It could be that your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or that the normal hepatic glucose output is higher than it should be. Some doctors have linked the intolerance to the poor disposal of blood sugar from the system. Doctors wanted to remove the social stigma of having diabetes. At the same time, they needed a way to note if someone was a higher risk, as well as note those who were at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Now that you know more about what glucose intolerance is, it’s time to note the main symptoms. This will help you get an official diagnosis and help to avoid this issue turning into full-blown diabetes. Feeli Continue reading >>

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