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What Can Diabetics Drink Other Than Water?

Water Can Heal - Water And Diabetes | Apec Water

Water Can Heal - Water And Diabetes | Apec Water

Have you ever been dying of thirst and a coworker or friend said, "You know, you may have diabetes?" Sounds like a stretch, but in reality, thirst can be a signal of this disease that is taking America by storm. So why is thirst linked to diabetes? According to a 1995 CNN.com article, with diabetes, excess blood sugar, or glucose, in your body draws water from your tissues, making you feel dehydrated. To quench your thirst, you drink a lot of water and other beverages which leads to more frequent urination. If you notice unexplained increases in your thirst and urination, see your doctor. It may not necessarily mean you have diabetes. It could be something else. If you already have diabetes, then you know that you already have to make some changes to your diet. As mentioned above, drinking water in place of the sugary options is crucial. Water is, according to diabetes-specialists, important for everybody, but especially for diabetes-patients, because even a small decrease of the hydration-level could cause serious health problems for diabetics. One of the best warning signs that glucose levels are high is thirst. And, water is the best way to quench that thirst, and to break down those sugars. Also, in order to keep the body functioning normally, water should be a constant. But, water can be lost through exercise and normal exposure to high temps. With that, being hydrated will help prevent fatigue and help physical performance. A study presented at the annual meeting of American diabetes association included 3,615 men and women with normal blood sugar levels at the beginning of the study. Those who reported they drank more than 36 ounces of water a day (4.5 cups) were 21% less likely to develop hyperglycemia over the next 9 years than those who said they drank 16 oun Continue reading >>

Approved Drinks For Diabetics

Approved Drinks For Diabetics

Learn How to Properly Manage Your Liquid Intake as a Diabetic When you’re diagnosed with diabetes, one of the first things your health care team will go over is how important it is to manage your blood sugar levels. This will require making some adjustments in your daily life, especially when it comes to your food and liquid intake. Many people don’t realize that what they drink have just as much impact on their body as the meals they consume. The goal for diabetics is to avoid beverages that have a high percentage of calories and carbohydrates, but if you’ve never thought much about what you drink before, it can be a challenge knowing exactly which options are healthiest and which are more likely to have a negative impact. Here’s a basic guide that will assist you in making good choices as you weigh out your options: If you have diabetes, these are the beverages you should turn to first to quench your thirst. » Water: Without a doubt, it’s important to significantly increase your water consumption. Since it doesn’t have any carbs, sugars, or calories, it’s the ideal drink for diabetics. If the taste gets too boring, you can add a touch of flavor by infusing it with juice from citrus fruits. » Milk: The calcium and vitamin D in milk is essential to a diabetic’s diet. Although, the key is to limit your serving size and make the switch from whole milk to low-fat or skim milk. » Tea: Green and herbal teas provide a little more flavor than water and come with a host of health benefits, particularly for the heart. Unsweetened iced teas are also a good option for something more refreshing. » Coffee: If you can’t get through the day without your cup of coffee, there’s no reason to panic. You can maintain your coffee habit, but be sure to keep it unsweet Continue reading >>

5 Tasty, Healthy Drinks Other Than Water

5 Tasty, Healthy Drinks Other Than Water

Let’s face it and be totally honest… YES, water is good for you and you should drink plenty of it. But if you are transitioning from a lifestyle that included drinking soda pop, powdered drink mixes, fruit juices (labeled “natural” or not) and any other flavored, sugary beverages, YET; you are making strides towards a healthier lifestyle… Sometimes you want other healthy drinks besides water. Am I right? I mean, after a meal, don’t you sometimes find yourself kinda wanting something sweet and tasty? Don’t get me wrong… I can eat a meal (or snack) and a glass of water will definitely quench my thirst and all. But sometimes that apple juice I bought for the kids begins lookin’ mighty tasty, sitting there in the fridge lookin’ all cold, crisp & refreshing! *tsk* *tsk* *tsk* – What to do, what to do? Well, there are actually quite a few things you can drink that will satisfy your thirst for something with some ‘flava’ and that’s what I’m going to share with you today. 5 Healthy Drinks Other Than Water Now as an fyi, I do not claim this list is exhaustive as there may be other things out there as well. But these are things I, personally, have drank or currently drink, along with drinking water. 1. Infused water These seem to be all the rage these days – infusing water with various fruit such as strawberries, orange slices, lemon slices, grapefruit slices, cucumbers, and even mint leaves, etc. and sipping on them. And not only are they a refreshing drink, but some are also touted to aid in slimming the tummy in one way or another. The added fruit can take the “blah” out of drinking water. 2. Lemonade I LOVE lemonade! It’s probably one of my favorite beverages – tart with just the right amount of sweetness… Mmmm. And it’s so easy to Continue reading >>

What's A Good Cold Drink, Besides Diet Soda And Water?

What's A Good Cold Drink, Besides Diet Soda And Water?

A: Hi Patti-cake, Most “regular” and non-diet drinks contain carbohydrate, often in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, cane sugar or fruit juice. While drinking small amounts of these drinks is okay, they can add up in carbohydrate and calories. If you choose not to drink “diet” beverages, or those that are sweetened with non-nutritive sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose or stevia, your choices are somewhat limited. Options include: water, seltzer water or club soda, flavored seltzer water, unsweetened iced tea (black, green, white and herbal teas are good) and unsweetened ice coffee. You can also try diluting a small amount of fruit juice, like cranberry juice, for example, with seltzer water to make a “juice spritzer.” If you use no more than ¼ cup of juice, you’ll consume about 30 calories and 8 grams of carbohydrate (but you’ll need to limit how often you drink this beverage, as, here too, the calories and carbs can add up). Continue reading >>

10 Low-carb Beverages To Drink When You Have Diabetes

10 Low-carb Beverages To Drink When You Have Diabetes

10 Low-Carb Beverages To Drink When You Have Diabetes Reviewed by Robert Hurd, MD on Aug 26, 2017 Just because you control your diabetes with a low-carb diet doesnt mean that you dont have lots of choices of great drinks. In fact, all of the treats here will fit your healthy lifestyle and still satisfy your taste buds. Water is so common that we take it for granted until we run out of it. Besides air, nothing is more necessary for life. But dont settle for unfiltered tap water or waste money on bottles of it. A home filter removes impurities and greatly improves the taste by taking out the chlorine. Keeping a bottle of water in the fridge or adding ice cubes can give it some variety. You can buy sparkling water at all the food stores, but you can make it sparkle at home without buying bottles or carting them home. For years Ive added fizz to my water and to my life with a Sodastream CO2 carbonator. Even better is enhancing its flavor with zero carb SweetLeaf Water Drops or by simply adding a slice of lemon. Is drinking coffee bad for people with diabetes? Or does it help? Hundreds of studies seem to show one extreme or the other. But many experts now say that drinking one to three cups to day is either neutral or helpful. If you like it white, instead of adding milk or half & half (too many carbs), you can switch to a milk alternative (see slide 9). Instead of sugar, you can use carb-free stevia. After water, more people drink tea than anything else. Im one of them (along with my morning coffee), and I prefer some of the black teas that dont need milk to bring out the flavor, especially those from the Assam and Darjeeling regions of India. Green tea from China with jasmine is another of my favorites. In fact, we have so many choices of tea that entire books are written Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 Best and Worst Drinks for Type 2 Diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, you know it's important to watch what you eat — and the types of drinks you consume. Drinks that are high in carbohydrates and calories can affect both your weight and your blood sugar. "Generally speaking, you want your calories and carbs to come from whole foods, not from drinks," says Nessie Ferguson, RD, CDE, a nutritionist at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The best drinks have either zero or very few calories, and deciding on a beverage isn't really difficult. "When it comes right down to it, good beverage choices for type 2 diabetes are good choices for everyone," she says. Some good drinks for type 2 diabetes include: Water Fat-free or low-fat milk Black coffee Unsweetened tea (hot or iced) Flavored water (zero calories) or seltzer But sugary soda is one of the worst types of drinks for type 2 diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. The problems with soda include: Empty calories. Soft drinks are very high in sugar, have zero nutritional value, and are often used in place of healthy drinks such as milk. Cavities. The high sugar combined with the acid in soda dissolves tooth enamel, which increases the risk of cavities. Weight gain. Sugary sodas have about 10 teaspoons of sugar per 12-ounce can. Boosts risk of diabetes and risk of complications for those who have diabetes. Some people with type 2 diabetes continue to drink alcohol, but you should be aware that any alcohol consumption may result in dangerously low blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours. That’s why it’s important to check your blood sugar often and get your doctor's okay before you drink alcohol. People with diabetes should only consume alcohol if their diabetes is well controlled and should always wear a medical Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

Healthy Beverage Guidelines

Healthy Beverage Guidelines

Table of Contents Beverage Guidelines from the Experts Introduction In the beginning there was water—abundant, refreshing, providing everything the body needs to replenish the fluids it loses. Humans relied on it as their only beverage for millions of years. Milk came next, with the advent of agriculture and the domestication of animals. Then beer and wine and coffee and tea, all drunk for taste and pleasure as much as for the fluids they provide. The newcomers—soft drinks, sports and energy drinks, and the like—offer hydration but with a hefty dose of unnecessary calories that the body may have a hard time regulating. With so many choices, all with different, sometimes unexpected effects on health, it’s easy to be confused about the “best” beverages for health. This prompted a group of nutrition experts from across the U.S. to form the independent Beverage Guidance Panel. These six researchers, including Dr. Walter C. Willett of the Harvard School of Public Health’s Department of Nutrition, reviewed the evidence on beverages and health and ranked categories of beverages into six levels, based on calories delivered, contribution to intake of energy and essential nutrients, and evidence for positive and negative effects on health. (1) The winner? Water. But that doesn’t mean that water is the only beverage that’s good for your health, or that everyone needs to drink eight glasses of water a day. Beverage Guidelines from the Experts The Beverage Guidance Panel distilled its advice into a six-level pitcher, much as food experts have done with the food pyramid. The group published its recommendations in the March 2006 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Here is a description of each level: Level 1: Water Water provides everything the body Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

8 Drinks That Help Fight Diabetes

8 Drinks That Help Fight Diabetes

So one great addition to a healthier lifestyle for people who are living with diabetes is to include more water in your diet. The problem here? Plain water every day can taste kind of boring, and people with diabetes may already feel that their diets are restricted. So what are some good ways to up your water intake while not completely boring your palate? One simple solution is to incorporate spa water into your diet. With a name like that, it sounds indulgent, and fortunately, it can taste that way, too, while still being very good for you. Spa water is a delicious combination of fresh fruits, and sometimes herbs, that you can infuse into cold water. It's great to keep a pitcher in your fridge running, and you can mix up a variety of different combinations with whatever ingredients you like so that you don't get tired of the same tastes every day. We recommend a combination of diabetes-fighting lemon and lime wheels with some anti-oxidant-packed fresh berries. You can slice up just one or two strawberries and they'll infuse a whole pitcher of water with their bright, berry sweetness. Peppermint, which is thought to potentially help both nerve and digestive disorders associated with diabetes, can be added to spa water as well, for a fresh, invigorating, and healthful taste. Eating and drinking well is something everyone should enjoy, and having diabetes should never prevent you from doing that. But learning how to make healthy (and tasty) drink choices when you have diabetes may take some getting used to. Take a look at our suggestions to find out more about healthful drink options you should feel great about enjoying. Chamomile Tea No calories, big flavor, and a boatload of antioxidants have made chamomile tea trendy for health reasons, especially for diabetics. Resea Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

It is recommended to consume citrus fruit juice Drink juice along with meal if you are diabetic Along with a diabetes-healthy diet, diabetics may consume certain fruit juices, but in moderation. Whole fruits, however, are a better and healthier choice than juices. Juices, such as grapefruit juice, pineapple juice and orange juice, if taken in moderation, are considered appropriate for diabetics. All types of citrus fruit juices are superfood for diabetics as they are nutrient-rich, says American Diabetes Association (ADA). Apart from citrus juices, diabetics may also drink apple juice for it is rich in fibre, lemon juice as it is low on carbs, tomato juice as it is low on sugar content and carrot juice as it is juiced raw. All fruit juices, however, also contain significant amount of sugar, which can cause blood sugar levels to spike. Therefore, moderate consumption of fruit juices is advised. Carbs from juices also adds to your total intake of carbohydrates for the day. Having juice along with the meal can surely reduce the effects of sugar content of the juice. While citrus juices are low on Glycemic Index table, pineapple and orange juice is rated 46 and grapefruit juice is rated 48. Consumption of carbs present in the juices results in increased blood sugar levels, though the impact varies from individual to individual. Here are a few points that diabetics should consider if they wish to consume juices or other beverages. The recommended amount of a fruit or any other drink is 4 oz. per day. Drinking juices separately can lead to quicker spike in blood glucose level. Added sugar in the juices is a major concern for the diabetics well-being. Fruit and vegetable juice prepared with the original pulp is a good choice for diabetics. Two of the best juices for diabetics Continue reading >>

What To Drink With Diabetes?

What To Drink With Diabetes?

Is there anything good for diabetes you can buy in a bottle and drink? If not, what can you drink that’s healthy? Beverages to avoid First off, do not drink bottled fruit juice. Health author Joy Bauer rated fruit juice the number one worst food for diabetes. Most bottled juice is not 100% juice and has additional sugar added. But according to Bauer, “Fruit juices, even 100% fruit juices, are chock-full of fruit sugar and cause a sharp spike in blood sugar.” Juice has a very high glycemic index, which means the sugar gets into your blood very fast. According to diabetes.co.uk, unsweetened orange juice has a glycemic index between 66 and 76, higher than most chocolate cake. People with diabetes do not have enough insulin to keep up with such a fast surge of sugar. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) agrees. “Avoid sugary drinks like regular soda, fruit punch, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks, or sweet tea. They can provide several hundred calories in just one serving. ADA advises tea, coffee, water, or milk instead. They do say that less than 4 ounces of juice at a meal might be manageable for some people with diabetes. There are other problems with juice besides the sugar. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice has almost no fiber. Bottled juice is usually stored in massive oxygen-depleted holding tanks for up to a year before it is packaged. Then lost flavor iss restored with “flavor packs.” Recent studies, however, have shown that juice does have some benefits. It helps prevent cancer and heart disease as well as whole fruits. It has more nutritional benefits than sodas, even if the sugar spike is just as bad. Dietitian Amy Campbell says vegetable juices such as V8 are healthier can be drunk in larger amounts than the sweeter juices. Continue reading >>

Healthy Beverages For Diabetics

Healthy Beverages For Diabetics

Enjoy Refreshing Beverages and Keep Your Diabetes Under Control When faced with diabetes, it's important to watch not only what you eat, but also what you drink. Beverages can sneak in extra sugars and carbohydrates that you need to monitor when adhering to a diabetic diet. Try these great, diabetes-friendly drinks when you are looking to quench your thirst. © 2016 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. Continue reading >>

The 10 Healthiest Beverages (other Than Water)

The 10 Healthiest Beverages (other Than Water)

The 10 Healthiest Beverages (Other Than Water) There are only so many times you can say, Just water forme, thanks, when the waiter takes your beverage order before you start to getbored. Water is a healthy and safe bet, sure. In fact, it cantbe beat. So what do you do when you want more options but dont want to strayfrom the healthy side of things? Luckily, there are actually severalbeverages that can do you one favor or another while spicing up yourwaterlogged palette. The powerful pomegranatehas been consistently praised recently for the hefty antioxidants it packs.Research has suggested that the red juice may help prevent inflammation, heartdisease, and cancer . So having a glass every now and then is a goodchoice. Just make sure you look at what you are drinking, as some bottles arediluted with other liquids or have added sugars. You want pure pomegranate.Dont accept anything less. Milk has always beenthere for you, hasnt it? Touted as an excellent source of calcium and vitaminD since you were a child, itmay seem like less of a grown-up drink than other options, but low fat and skim milk are still great sources of protein and other essential micronutrients. Andthese low-fat varieties are the best choices because they contain much lesssaturated fat than reduced-fat milk or whole milk. A cup of green tea is abetter choice than a cup of joe when that afternoon slump hits. You are jonesingfor a caffeine buzz, so this will do the trick, with just enough caffeine togive you that energy boost but not so much that you crash later.And you'll also get a nice side of antioxidants with each cup. A glass of fresh squeezedOJ really hits the spot, but some feel it takes too much effort to make on aregular basis. If that is the case, save it for when it will be most handy,like com Continue reading >>

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