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What Can An Endocrinologist Do For My Diabetes?

Your Visit To The Endocrinologist: What To Expect

Your Visit To The Endocrinologist: What To Expect

After narrowing down your search for an endocrinologist, you have finally selected the one that you think will give you the best care for your diabetes. Diabetes is one of the most common conditions endocrinologists manage. You can work with your doctor to control this disease. You should write down any questions you have as preparation for your appointment. You should go to see an endocrinologist when you’re having problems controlling your diabetes. Your primary care physician may also recommend that you see a specialist for managing diabetes. Signs and symptoms that your diabetes isn’t well-controlled and may benefit from the expertise of an endocrinologist include: tingling in your hands and feet from nerve damage frequent episodes of low or high blood sugar levels weight changes vision problems kidney problems frequent hospital admissions because of diabetes A visit to the endocrinologist usually involves: a complete medical history a head-to-toe exam blood and urine tests an explanation of your management plan This is just a brief overview. Your appointment will start with a measurement of your height, weight, and vital signs, including blood pressure and pulse. They’ll probably check your blood sugar using a finger stick. Your doctor will want to check your teeth to ensure you don’t have mouth infections, and they will check the skin of your hands and feet to ensure that you aren’t developing sores or skin infections. They’ll listen to your heart and lungs with a stethoscope and feel your abdomen with their hands. Be prepared for questions about your current symptoms, family history, and eating habits. Your doctor will want to know how much you exercise you get and what your blood sugars typically run. It’s important to bring a record of your blood Continue reading >>

What Is An Endocrinologist?

What Is An Endocrinologist?

Endocrinologists are doctors who specialize in glands and the hormones they make. They deal with metabolism, or all the biochemical processes that make your body work, including how your body changes food into energy and how it grows. They may work with adults or kids. When they specialize in treating children, they're called pediatric endocrinologists. They cover a lot of ground, diagnosing and treating conditions that affect your: Adrenals, glands that sit on top of your kidneys and help to control things like your blood pressure, metabolism, stress response, and sex hormones Bone metabolism, like osteoporosis Cholesterol Hypothalamus, the part of your brain that controls body temperature, hunger, and thirst Pancreas, which makes insulin and other substances for digestion Parathyroids, small glands in your neck that control the calcium in your blood Pituitary, a pea-sized gland at the base of your brain that keeps your hormones balanced Reproductive glands (gonads): ovaries in women, testes in men Thyroid, a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck that controls your metabolism, energy, and brain growth and development Endocrinologists are licensed internal medicine doctors who have passed an additional certification exam. They go to college for 4 years, then medical school for 4 more years. Afterward, they work in hospitals and clinics as residents for 3 years to get experience treating people. They'll spend another 2 or 3 years training specifically in endocrinology. The whole process usually takes at least 10 years. An endocrinologist can work in: A medical practice with other endocrinologists A group with different kinds of doctors Hospitals You can search for one on the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists website. Some don't see patients. They may work i Continue reading >>

Value Of An Endocrinologist

Value Of An Endocrinologist

When you are facing a diagnosis of a hormonal condition, like diabetes or thyroid disease, your doctor may suggest you see an endocrinologist. You may be wondering why you need to see a specialist instead of simply sticking with your primary doctor. Here are some reasons why an endocrinologist will provide the level of support and care that you need with this diagnosis. An Endocrinologist is a True Specialist An endocrinologist is a specialist who has thoroughly studied hormonal conditions and knows the best possible treatments, even when conventional treatments do not work well. Unlike a family doctor or general practitioner, an endocrinologist studies hormones and hormonal diseases in depth, and this specialist will be able to provide the best possible treatment. Most general practitioners have the skills necessary to diagnose and treat basic hormonal conditions, but sometimes the help of a specialist is needed. An Endocrinologist Helps Non-Traditional Patients Some patients have diseases that progress as the textbooks say they should. The standard treatments work and they are able to manage their conditions with oral or injected medication with minimal disruption to their day-to-day living. Other patients find that conventional treatment does not work. They stick with the treatments religiously, but they achieve no results. In these cases, an endocrinologist is necessary to ensure all possible treatment avenues are pursued. Some patients need unique care due to other health conditions that affect their hormonal conditions. They may have a genetic condition, like cystic fibrosis, that affects the way their bodies react to treatments. The traditional-path patients may not see the value of an endocrinologist. Those who are in one of the latter categories, however, do. I Continue reading >>

5 Reasons To See An Endocrinologist If You Have Diabetes

5 Reasons To See An Endocrinologist If You Have Diabetes

Last fall I didn’t want to go to my endocrinologist because I was worried about the possible results of my latest A1C test. Seemingly 5 pounds heavier than my last visit, I had no interest in being weighed. Although I fully know how important it is to take your blood sugar regularly when you have diabetes, I hadn’t been doing so, and when I did test it, I didn’t like what I saw. There were mornings when I woke to a spike in my glucose or late afternoons when, after skipping lunch, it dropped too low. If only I had exercised more. Or eaten fewer carbs. Or not stressed out about every little thing. I was ashamed that I hadn’t worked harder. How had I fallen so off track? What would my doctor think of me? The Benefits of Seeing an Endocrinologist for Diabetes Of course, endocrinologists who specialize in diabetes care aren’t there to judge patients. Their job is to go over your blood tests, particularly your hemoglobin A1C readings, which tell you the two- to three-month average of your blood sugar level. They’re there to check your feet, to make sure your circulation is healthy; to take your blood pressure; to respond to any problems you may have encountered since the last visit; and to fine-tune your diabetes care. Despite this knowledge, when it comes to my hesitation to visit my doctor, I have a feeling I’m not alone. But no matter about these worries, Eileen Sturner, manager of diabetes and outpatient nutrition at Abington Jefferson Health in Pennsylvania, has one message for her diabetes patients: Keep the appointment. “Whether it's the dietitian, the primary-care physician, or the endocrinologist, we’re all here to help patients achieve good care,” Sturner says. “So even if from the patient’s perspective they are not achieving what they want Continue reading >>

Should Everyone With Diabetes See An Endocrinologist?

Should Everyone With Diabetes See An Endocrinologist?

I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes by my primary-care doctor. Do I need to see a specialist? In general, if you have uncomplicated type 2 diabetes, your primary-care doctor can manage your diabetes care. But I do recommend, especially for new-onset diabetes, that you ask your primary-care doctor to refer you to one particular kind of specialist—a certified diabetes educator (CDE). Among other things, a CDE is specially trained to be able to advise you on lifestyle changes, such as proper nutrition and how much and what kinds of physical activity will help you manage your blood sugar and avoid diabetic complications. Having a CDE assist you with these and other time-consuming elements of treatment relieves some of the burden of care from your doctor, who is not likely to have as much time available during a regular office visit. That’s why a CDE needs to be a key part of your health-care team. Type 1 diabetes is a different story. Anyone who has type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder, should have an endocrinologist on his/her health-care team. An endocrinologist is able to oversee the tightly structured treatment program necessary to manage type 1 diabetes and deal with such things as high-tech insulin pumps, continuous glucose-monitoring devices and so forth. Some people with type 2 diabetes also should see an endocrinologist. See one if… • You’re having trouble controlling your blood sugar. • You and your primary-care doctor are finding it difficult to find the right mix of medications to control your blood sugar without worrisome side effects, including low blood sugar. • You need to take three or more insulin injections per day or use an insulin pump. Even if your type 2 diabetes doesn’t include the above challenges, it makes sense to cons Continue reading >>

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

Many people who have diabetes also have an experienced primary care (or family practice) doctor or nurse practitioner who can help them manage their diabetes. For example, people with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes may never need to see a specialist because they can easily manage it with their primary care doctor’s help. Other people, however, might choose to see a specialist. Here are 10 reasons why you might want to see an endocrinologist or diabetes care team: 1) Your doctor recommends you have an evaluation with a specialist. After you have been diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may recommend you see a specialist to confirm the diagnosis and make sure you know your options for managing the disease. 2) Your primary care physician has not treated many diabetes patients. If your doctor has not treated many patients with diabetes or you are unsure about their treatment, you can choose to see a specialist. 3) You are having problems communicating with your doctor. If you feel your doctor is not listening to you or understanding your symptoms, you could see a specialist who will focus primarily on your diabetes. 4) You cannot find the right educational material to help you. Treatment for diabetes starts with learning to manage your diabetes. If you can’t find the right information to help you manage your diabetes, you might want to see a diabetes care team to receive diabetes education. 5) You are having complications or difficulty managing your diabetes. You should definitely see a specialist if you have developed complications. Diabetes typically causes problems with the eyes, kidney, and nerves. In addition, it can cause deformity and open sores on the feet. Diabetes complications only get worse with time, and can cause you to miss out on quality of life. In addi Continue reading >>

Ask An Endocrinologist: Understanding&managing Diabetes

Ask An Endocrinologist: Understanding&managing Diabetes

grkbfd: With Type 2 diabetes and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), how do these affect each other? Dr__Olansky: Polymyalgia rheumatica is usually treated with prednisone, but prednisone causes insulin resistance. This will raise the blood glucose in people with diabetes or prediabetes. mj22: What is the best treatment for ulcers on the leg resulting from Type 2 diabetes? Dr__Olansky: The best treatment for foot ulcers in patients with diabetes is to keep the ulcers clear, treat any infection with antibiotics and keep the pressure off the ulcer. This patient might need a special shoe if the ulcer is on the bottom of the foot. Crutches may be used and avoid bearing weight on that foot. In some patients, hyperbaric oxygen can help. sam500016: I have Type 2 diabetes and I have been on metformin (500 mg twice daily) for the past four years. It appears to agree with me and I am able to maintain my A1C level around six percent. However, my serum lactate is more than 2.4, which is very high. How should I deal with my high lactate level ? Dr__Olansky: I would not worry about an elevated lactate as long as your kidney function is normal and you feel well. We know metformin interferes with lactate conversion to glucose, so that is why yours is somewhat elevated. However, lactic acidosis makes you feel sick. thereg: What can you tell me about taking statins and high fasting glucose results? Before lowering my cholesterol with statins, my fasting glucose was normal. Now the doctor says I have pre-diabetes Dr__Olansky: In a large state trial called Jupiter, it was shown that there was more diabetes in patients that received the statin drug, but all the people who developed diabetes had either a fasting blood glucoses above the normal range or a HgbA1c that was in the diabetic range. Wha Continue reading >>

Do All People With Diabetes 2 Need To See An Endocrinologist?

Do All People With Diabetes 2 Need To See An Endocrinologist?

Do all people with diabetes 2 need to see an endocrinologist? The short answer to this question is no, but it deserves an explanation. First of all, and unfortunately, there is a severe shortage of endocrinologists in many parts of the country, so even if I thought the right answer was yes, it wouldnt be a practical answer for everyone. But the right answer for this, and for most medical problems, is that you need a good working relationship with a primary physician who is interested in you as a person and your concerns, keeps as up-to-date as can be expected to knowing how much there is to know, communicates well and knows his or her limits. I know of family practitioners, nurse practitioners and general internists who render great diabetes care, and I know some endocrinologists who I dont think do such a good job. Its important to be your own healthcare advocate. Start by being prepared when you go in for your visits. This means having your blood tests done in advance of your visit so that you can discuss the results at the time of the appointment, brining an up-to-date list of all your medications, and bringing well-organized blood sugar readings with you. These steps will go a long way to ensuring that you get good care. If youre not having success despite good care from your primary physician and a good effort on your part, ask to see an endocrinologist your doctor trusts. Continue reading >>

Why Should I See An Endocrinologist If I Have Diabetes?

Why Should I See An Endocrinologist If I Have Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, seeing an endocrinologist is important because they specialize in diabetes and metabolism, and have the latest information on the issues that impact the disease. Watch as endocrinologist Reza Yavari, MD, describes his specialty. An endocrinologist is a physician who specializes in treating diseases of the hormone-producing glands. As insulin is a hormone, diabetes is considered a hormonal disorder. Endocrinologists also treat thyroid disease, pituitary disorders, high or low blood calcium, adrenal problems, and low testosterone or other sex hormone disorders. Some endocrinologists specialize in fertility issues, including the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome, a common condition in women of childbearing age that often coexists with prediabetes. In many areas of the country there is a shortage of endocrinologists, particularly given the rapid increase in the prevalence of diabetes. Most people with type 2 diabetes will not need to see an endocrinologist, but many people with type 1 diabetes and those with type 2 who have had difficulty managing their blood sugar levels will benefit from seeing someone in this specialty. The Best Life Guide to Managing Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes Bob Greene has helped millions of Americans become fit and healthy with his life-changing Best Life plan. Now, for the first time, Oprah's trusted expert on diet and fitness teams up with a leading... Continue reading >>

Endocrinologists And Diabetics

Endocrinologists And Diabetics

Have you been referred to an endocrinologist? If you are a diabetic, an endocrinologist can play an important role on your health care team. This medical specialty focuses on glands and hormones, both of which must be monitored in diabetics. The endocrine system is the physiological system that produces many of the hormones in your body. Hormones travel via the blood and act as messengers throughout the cells in the body. The insulin hormone works to ensure that energy from the food you eat flows through the blood to your muscles, your body fat, and your liver. A person whose body does not produce enough insulin is at risk of developing diabetes. This means that the body can no longer control the levels of sugar in the blood. An endocrinologist is a physician who specializes in treating the endocrine system, hormones, and metabolic disorders that affect the endocrine system. Diabetes is the number one endocrine disease.[1] An endocrinologist utilizes laboratory tests such as blood work and urine tests, physical exams, and other diagnostic methods to diagnose and treat diabetes. They can give advice on proper diet and nutrition, healthy lifestyles, exercise, and other preventative measures for diabetics. Plus, an endocrinologist can prescribe medications like insulin to treat this condition and provide patients with long-term care. If your doctor has referred you to an endocrinologist, it is important to not procrastinate. The majority of diabetics see an endocrinologist when they are having difficulty managing their diabetes. You may also choose to see a specialist if you are having specific symptoms related to your diabetes that include neuropathy, excessive hunger or thirst, or constant urination. All of these symptoms are warning signs that your diabetes may in the Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition that affects a person's blood sugar levels and can require various treatments. Understanding which doctors help treat diabetes can simplify the process, making it less stressful. This article helps people with diabetes to understand the key differences between the various diabetes specialists. It also covers some common guidelines to follow for visiting each of these experts, to ensure you get the most out of your treatment. Which doctors help with treating diabetes? There are a number of diabetes specialists who may be involved in treating someone with this common condition. As each of these specialists has a slightly different role, there are some key things to be aware of before seeing each one. General care physicians A general care physician will often help in the treatment of people with diabetes. Regular check-ups will usually be carried out once every 3 to 4 months. If there is anything outside their area of expertise, a general care physician will frequently send an individual to an endocrinologist first of all. Endocrinologists The most common specialists in the field of diabetes are endocrinologists. Endocrinologists specialize in the glands of the body, and the hormones that are produced from those glands. The pancreas is a gland that comes under the spotlight when managing diabetes. It produces insulin that helps regulate blood sugar. In the case of people with diabetes, insulin is either not produced or does not work properly. People with type 1 diabetes are put under the care of an endocrinologist most of the time. People with type 2 diabetes, who have fluctuating blood sugar levels, will also need to see an endocrinologist. Visiting a doctor for diabetes When visiting a doctor about diabetes for the first time, it is important tha Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doctor Tips | Endocrinologist | Healthgrades.com

Diabetes Doctor Tips | Endocrinologist | Healthgrades.com

If you have type 2 diabetes, it means your body isnt using insulin the way it should. Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas that helps move sugar from your blood to your muscles and other cells so they have enough energy to function. With type 2 diabetes, though, you need more insulin than usual to do this task. That means your pancreas has to do more work. Its basically like its running on a treadmill trying to keep up. When doctors treat type 2 diabetes, we prescribe lifestyle changes and medications to patients with the goal of helping the pancreas do its job as well as possible for as long as possible. We tell patients to cut down on sugar intake, so the pancreas doesnt have as much work to do, we give medications that help insulin work more effectively and we also often prescribe insulin to help do some of the pancreas job for it. Controlling diabetes means committing to a healthier overall lifestyle, as well as taking medication regularly, so I always share the following with my patients to keep them on track: 1.Understand what youre putting into your body. Its so important that patients know what foods they can eat without raising their blood sugar levels, and which foods they need to carefully portion. Many of my patients dont realize fruit can be problematic with type 2 diabetes. Most patients think fruit is really healthy, and it is, but too much fruit can make your blood sugar levels very high because theyre full of natural sugar. A couple pieces of fruit each day is healthy for patients with diabetes, but its important to eat fruit, like everything, in moderation. I also encourage my patients to read nutrition facts labels and I teach them how to understand them. A lot of the marketing out there is very confusinga label may say theres no sugar added, so Continue reading >>

How Can I Find An Endocrinologist?

How Can I Find An Endocrinologist?

How do you find an endocrinologist when you need an answer to a diabetes problem that other doctors cannot provide? My internist recently sent a referral to yet another endocrinologist and, after a month, there has been no response. When I have tried to find an endocrinologist before, the first thing I am asked is whether I am on Medicare. My reply in the affirmative has always been my last contact with that endocrinologist. What can I do? Barbara Haupt, Boise, Idaho R. Mack Harrell, MD, FACP, FACE, responds: WHAT TO KNOW: Our best guess is that there are 5,000 practicing endocrinologists in the United States and more than 25 million people with diabetes. This effectively means that there is one endocrinologist for every 5,000 people with diabetes. As you can imagine, this demand for diabetes services far exceeds what any single endocrinologist can offer, because the average physician can usually handle no more than 500 to 750 people with this disease in his or her practice. Diabetes care is not easy. The Medicare system requires paperwork up to four times yearly explaining the patient's use of blood glucose supplies, and expensive medications require physician letters of medical necessity whenever they are renewed. Most patients are seen in the office at least four times a year, and many endocrinologists ask their patients to fax in blood glucose numbers every two to four weeks to make sure that glucose control is stable. All of this makes diabetes care extremely time consuming and expensive for a physician and his or her office. POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS: All that said, you should still be able to find an endocrinologist in the Boise area who can help you. If you are not online yourself, just have an Internet-savvy friend or relative help you go on the Web and visit the Ame Continue reading >>

Endocrinologist – Why See One?

Endocrinologist – Why See One?

There is more to treating diabetes than keeping your blood sugar levels healthy. Most people with diabetes have a health care team to help them manage. Discover why you may need to see an endocrinologist when you have diabetes. People with diabetes typically work with a health care team including a primary care physician, dentist, ophthalmologist, podiatrist, a diabetes nurse educator, fitness trainer and dietitian. Another person who may be part of your health care team is an endocrinologist. An endocrinologist has extra specialized training to diagnose and treat illnesses that affect your endocrine system, hormones and glands. Insulin is a central hormone the body needs to function and your pancreas is part of the endocrine system. Typically an endocrinologist treats people with diabetes, metabolic disorders, growth disorders, thyroid disease and other related conditions. Often your primary care physician will refer you to an endocrinologist if a specialist is required to help assist with your diabetes self-management program. Most people with type 1 diabetes are advised to see an endocrinologist especially when the condition is new and they are still learning. It may be difficult for the primary care physician to prescribe an insulin regime. People with type 2 diabetes may also be referred when they develop complications or have difficulty managing their condition. An endocrinologist can help you manage your diabetes in the best way possible. In certain situations, a general physician might not be completely comfortable caring for diabetes or could lack the resources to educate a patient. Endocrinologists provide patients with essential information about taking care of diabetes. This helps the patient to be well-trained and motivated to participate fully in their own Continue reading >>

How An Endocrinologist Can Help You Manage Your Type 2 Diabetes

How An Endocrinologist Can Help You Manage Your Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes is a growing problem among the American population and worldwide. In fact, it is estimated that roughly 30 million people have Type 2 Diabetes in the United States alone. This is in part due to the prevalence of obesity in children and the increase of people who live sedentary lifestyles and eat a high amount of processed foods. The good news is that in many cases Type 2 Diabetes can be prevented through proper diet and exercise. Type 2 Diabetes occurs when your body does not use insulin properly, which is called insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that turns glucose from the food you consume into energy. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for this, but, over time your pancreas isn’t able to keep up and is unable to produce enough insulin to keep your blood glucose levels in normal range. As the result, sugar builds up in your blood and in long term will lead to serious complications. Some symptoms of Type 2 diabetes include increased thirst, increased urination, weight loss, fatigue, recurrent infections and frequent yeast infections. Oftentimes Type 2 Diabetes is diagnosed through blood work, but early diabetes can be missed on routine fasting blood work. Some people have a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than others. It is more common among African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans and Asian American/Pacific Islanders as well as the aging population. Other risk factors for Type 2 diabetes include an increased BMI that falls into the obesity range, hypertension, and women with a history of polycystic ovary syndrome, those with a family history of diabetes, having autoimmune condition or take steroid on regular basis. Type 2 Diabetes is treated with lifestyle changes, weight loss, exercise, then oral medications ( Continue reading >>

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