diabetestalk.net

What Can An Endocrinologist Do For A Person With Diabetes?

Your Visit To The Endocrinologist: What To Expect

Your Visit To The Endocrinologist: What To Expect

After narrowing down your search for an endocrinologist, you have finally selected the one that you think will give you the best care for your diabetes. Diabetes is one of the most common conditions endocrinologists manage. You can work with your doctor to control this disease. You should write down any questions you have as preparation for your appointment. You should go to see an endocrinologist when you’re having problems controlling your diabetes. Your primary care physician may also recommend that you see a specialist for managing diabetes. Signs and symptoms that your diabetes isn’t well-controlled and may benefit from the expertise of an endocrinologist include: tingling in your hands and feet from nerve damage frequent episodes of low or high blood sugar levels weight changes vision problems kidney problems frequent hospital admissions because of diabetes A visit to the endocrinologist usually involves: a complete medical history a head-to-toe exam blood and urine tests an explanation of your management plan This is just a brief overview. Your appointment will start with a measurement of your height, weight, and vital signs, including blood pressure and pulse. They’ll probably check your blood sugar using a finger stick. Your doctor will want to check your teeth to ensure you don’t have mouth infections, and they will check the skin of your hands and feet to ensure that you aren’t developing sores or skin infections. They’ll listen to your heart and lungs with a stethoscope and feel your abdomen with their hands. Be prepared for questions about your current symptoms, family history, and eating habits. Your doctor will want to know how much you exercise you get and what your blood sugars typically run. It’s important to bring a record of your blood Continue reading >>

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

Many people who have diabetes also have an experienced primary care (or family practice) doctor or nurse practitioner who can help them manage their diabetes. For example, people with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes may never need to see a specialist because they can easily manage it with their primary care doctor’s help. Other people, however, might choose to see a specialist. Here are 10 reasons why you might want to see an endocrinologist or diabetes care team: 1) Your doctor recommends you have an evaluation with a specialist. After you have been diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may recommend you see a specialist to confirm the diagnosis and make sure you know your options for managing the disease. 2) Your primary care physician has not treated many diabetes patients. If your doctor has not treated many patients with diabetes or you are unsure about their treatment, you can choose to see a specialist. 3) You are having problems communicating with your doctor. If you feel your doctor is not listening to you or understanding your symptoms, you could see a specialist who will focus primarily on your diabetes. 4) You cannot find the right educational material to help you. Treatment for diabetes starts with learning to manage your diabetes. If you can’t find the right information to help you manage your diabetes, you might want to see a diabetes care team to receive diabetes education. 5) You are having complications or difficulty managing your diabetes. You should definitely see a specialist if you have developed complications. Diabetes typically causes problems with the eyes, kidney, and nerves. In addition, it can cause deformity and open sores on the feet. Diabetes complications only get worse with time, and can cause you to miss out on quality of life. In addi Continue reading >>

What Is An Endocrinologist?

What Is An Endocrinologist?

Diabetes is a complex disease, and there is a lot more to treating it than just keeping your blood sugar at a healthy level. Thankfully, today many individuals with diabetes have a whole team of skilled professionals to help them manage their illness, including a primary care physician, dietitian, eye doctor, podiatrist, dentist and even a fitness trainer all dedicated to keeping you healthy. According to information from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), it is also important to have an endocrinologist, a doctor who has special training in treating people with diabetes and hormonal disorders, on your care team as well. An endocrinologist is a specially trained doctor who can diagnose and treat diseases that affect your glands, hormones and your endocrine system. The pancreas is part of the endocrine system, and insulin is one of the central hormones the body needs to function properly. Endocrinologists often treat people with diabetes, thyroid disease, metabolic disorders and more. Like other physicians and medical doctors, an endocrinologist is required to finish four years in medical school and complete a three or four year residency. Then, endocrinologists are required to spend two or three more years learning how to diagnose and treat hormone conditions. Overall, an endocrinologist's training typically takes more than 10 years, according to data from The Hormone Foundation. In most cases, your primary care doctor refers you to an endocrinologist if he or she believes you need to see a specialist to help you manage your diabetes. Why see an endocrinologist? Though many people can successfully control their diabetes with their general practitioner's help, there are several cases in which it might be best to see an endocrinologist. The ADA asserts that most peop Continue reading >>

20 Questions To Ask A New Endocrinologist

20 Questions To Ask A New Endocrinologist

Here are some questions you might want to ask a doctor during this initial visit: 1. What is your experience with Type 1 diabetes? 2. What do you expect my A1C score to be? 5. Do you do the A1C test in your office? 6. How many times a day do you expect me to test my blood sugar? 7. What is your protocol on treating a bout of hypoglycemia? 8. What is your protocol on treating blood sugar levels that are 300 mg/dL or higher? 9. When do you have your patients test for ketones? 11. Do you have a certified diabetes educator who is experienced in working with people with Type 1 diabetes? 12. Do you have a dietician who is experienced in working with people with Type 1 diabetes? 13. Who takes insulin adjustment calls, and what are their hours? 14. Who do I call in the middle of the night? 16. Are you familiar with all the insulin pumps on the market? 18. Do you download pumps and meters at every visit? 19. Do you have many patients on continuous glucose monitors? 20. Who in your office works with prior authorizations in case I have an issue with supplies? Your options for doctors may be limited by geography. If you are in a rural area, there may only be one endocrinologist in the area, or there may be none. If thats the case, you will have to make the best of the situation and develop a good relationship with that physician. However, if you do have a choice, this set of questions will help you find the best medical provider possible for your needs. If you would like to buy The Savvy Diabetic A Survival Guide, you can do so at thesavvydiabetic.com/buythebook . This excerpt has been edited for length and clarity. Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here . Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type 2 Nation , our sister p Continue reading >>

Endocrinologist – Why See One?

Endocrinologist – Why See One?

There is more to treating diabetes than keeping your blood sugar levels healthy. Most people with diabetes have a health care team to help them manage. Discover why you may need to see an endocrinologist when you have diabetes. People with diabetes typically work with a health care team including a primary care physician, dentist, ophthalmologist, podiatrist, a diabetes nurse educator, fitness trainer and dietitian. Another person who may be part of your health care team is an endocrinologist. An endocrinologist has extra specialized training to diagnose and treat illnesses that affect your endocrine system, hormones and glands. Insulin is a central hormone the body needs to function and your pancreas is part of the endocrine system. Typically an endocrinologist treats people with diabetes, metabolic disorders, growth disorders, thyroid disease and other related conditions. Often your primary care physician will refer you to an endocrinologist if a specialist is required to help assist with your diabetes self-management program. Most people with type 1 diabetes are advised to see an endocrinologist especially when the condition is new and they are still learning. It may be difficult for the primary care physician to prescribe an insulin regime. People with type 2 diabetes may also be referred when they develop complications or have difficulty managing their condition. An endocrinologist can help you manage your diabetes in the best way possible. In certain situations, a general physician might not be completely comfortable caring for diabetes or could lack the resources to educate a patient. Endocrinologists provide patients with essential information about taking care of diabetes. This helps the patient to be well-trained and motivated to participate fully in their own Continue reading >>

Ask An Endocrinologist: Understanding&managing Diabetes

Ask An Endocrinologist: Understanding&managing Diabetes

grkbfd: With Type 2 diabetes and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), how do these affect each other? Dr__Olansky: Polymyalgia rheumatica is usually treated with prednisone, but prednisone causes insulin resistance. This will raise the blood glucose in people with diabetes or prediabetes. mj22: What is the best treatment for ulcers on the leg resulting from Type 2 diabetes? Dr__Olansky: The best treatment for foot ulcers in patients with diabetes is to keep the ulcers clear, treat any infection with antibiotics and keep the pressure off the ulcer. This patient might need a special shoe if the ulcer is on the bottom of the foot. Crutches may be used and avoid bearing weight on that foot. In some patients, hyperbaric oxygen can help. sam500016: I have Type 2 diabetes and I have been on metformin (500 mg twice daily) for the past four years. It appears to agree with me and I am able to maintain my A1C level around six percent. However, my serum lactate is more than 2.4, which is very high. How should I deal with my high lactate level ? Dr__Olansky: I would not worry about an elevated lactate as long as your kidney function is normal and you feel well. We know metformin interferes with lactate conversion to glucose, so that is why yours is somewhat elevated. However, lactic acidosis makes you feel sick. thereg: What can you tell me about taking statins and high fasting glucose results? Before lowering my cholesterol with statins, my fasting glucose was normal. Now the doctor says I have pre-diabetes Dr__Olansky: In a large state trial called Jupiter, it was shown that there was more diabetes in patients that received the statin drug, but all the people who developed diabetes had either a fasting blood glucoses above the normal range or a HgbA1c that was in the diabetic range. Wha Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition that affects a person's blood sugar levels and can require various treatments. Understanding which doctors help treat diabetes can simplify the process, making it less stressful. This article helps people with diabetes to understand the key differences between the various diabetes specialists. It also covers some common guidelines to follow for visiting each of these experts, to ensure you get the most out of your treatment. Which doctors help with treating diabetes? There are a number of diabetes specialists who may be involved in treating someone with this common condition. As each of these specialists has a slightly different role, there are some key things to be aware of before seeing each one. General care physicians A general care physician will often help in the treatment of people with diabetes. Regular check-ups will usually be carried out once every 3 to 4 months. If there is anything outside their area of expertise, a general care physician will frequently send an individual to an endocrinologist first of all. Endocrinologists The most common specialists in the field of diabetes are endocrinologists. Endocrinologists specialize in the glands of the body, and the hormones that are produced from those glands. The pancreas is a gland that comes under the spotlight when managing diabetes. It produces insulin that helps regulate blood sugar. In the case of people with diabetes, insulin is either not produced or does not work properly. People with type 1 diabetes are put under the care of an endocrinologist most of the time. People with type 2 diabetes, who have fluctuating blood sugar levels, will also need to see an endocrinologist. Visiting a doctor for diabetes When visiting a doctor about diabetes for the first time, it is important tha Continue reading >>

How Can I Find An Endocrinologist?

How Can I Find An Endocrinologist?

How do you find an endocrinologist when you need an answer to a diabetes problem that other doctors cannot provide? My internist recently sent a referral to yet another endocrinologist and, after a month, there has been no response. When I have tried to find an endocrinologist before, the first thing I am asked is whether I am on Medicare. My reply in the affirmative has always been my last contact with that endocrinologist. What can I do? Barbara Haupt, Boise, Idaho R. Mack Harrell, MD, FACP, FACE, responds: WHAT TO KNOW: Our best guess is that there are 5,000 practicing endocrinologists in the United States and more than 25 million people with diabetes. This effectively means that there is one endocrinologist for every 5,000 people with diabetes. As you can imagine, this demand for diabetes services far exceeds what any single endocrinologist can offer, because the average physician can usually handle no more than 500 to 750 people with this disease in his or her practice. Diabetes care is not easy. The Medicare system requires paperwork up to four times yearly explaining the patient's use of blood glucose supplies, and expensive medications require physician letters of medical necessity whenever they are renewed. Most patients are seen in the office at least four times a year, and many endocrinologists ask their patients to fax in blood glucose numbers every two to four weeks to make sure that glucose control is stable. All of this makes diabetes care extremely time consuming and expensive for a physician and his or her office. POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS: All that said, you should still be able to find an endocrinologist in the Boise area who can help you. If you are not online yourself, just have an Internet-savvy friend or relative help you go on the Web and visit the Ame Continue reading >>

What Is An Endocrinologist?

What Is An Endocrinologist?

Endocrinologists are doctors who specialize in glands and the hormones they make. They deal with metabolism, or all the biochemical processes that make your body work, including how your body changes food into energy and how it grows. They may work with adults or kids. When they specialize in treating children, they're called pediatric endocrinologists. They cover a lot of ground, diagnosing and treating conditions that affect your: Adrenals, glands that sit on top of your kidneys and help to control things like your blood pressure, metabolism, stress response, and sex hormones Bone metabolism, like osteoporosis Cholesterol Hypothalamus, the part of your brain that controls body temperature, hunger, and thirst Pancreas, which makes insulin and other substances for digestion Parathyroids, small glands in your neck that control the calcium in your blood Pituitary, a pea-sized gland at the base of your brain that keeps your hormones balanced Reproductive glands (gonads): ovaries in women, testes in men Thyroid, a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck that controls your metabolism, energy, and brain growth and development Endocrinologists are licensed internal medicine doctors who have passed an additional certification exam. They go to college for 4 years, then medical school for 4 more years. Afterward, they work in hospitals and clinics as residents for 3 years to get experience treating people. They'll spend another 2 or 3 years training specifically in endocrinology. The whole process usually takes at least 10 years. An endocrinologist can work in: A medical practice with other endocrinologists A group with different kinds of doctors Hospitals You can search for one on the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists website. Some don't see patients. They may work i Continue reading >>

5 Reasons To See An Endocrinologist If You Have Diabetes

5 Reasons To See An Endocrinologist If You Have Diabetes

Last fall I didn’t want to go to my endocrinologist because I was worried about the possible results of my latest A1C test. Seemingly 5 pounds heavier than my last visit, I had no interest in being weighed. Although I fully know how important it is to take your blood sugar regularly when you have diabetes, I hadn’t been doing so, and when I did test it, I didn’t like what I saw. There were mornings when I woke to a spike in my glucose or late afternoons when, after skipping lunch, it dropped too low. If only I had exercised more. Or eaten fewer carbs. Or not stressed out about every little thing. I was ashamed that I hadn’t worked harder. How had I fallen so off track? What would my doctor think of me? The Benefits of Seeing an Endocrinologist for Diabetes Of course, endocrinologists who specialize in diabetes care aren’t there to judge patients. Their job is to go over your blood tests, particularly your hemoglobin A1C readings, which tell you the two- to three-month average of your blood sugar level. They’re there to check your feet, to make sure your circulation is healthy; to take your blood pressure; to respond to any problems you may have encountered since the last visit; and to fine-tune your diabetes care. Despite this knowledge, when it comes to my hesitation to visit my doctor, I have a feeling I’m not alone. But no matter about these worries, Eileen Sturner, manager of diabetes and outpatient nutrition at Abington Jefferson Health in Pennsylvania, has one message for her diabetes patients: Keep the appointment. “Whether it's the dietitian, the primary-care physician, or the endocrinologist, we’re all here to help patients achieve good care,” Sturner says. “So even if from the patient’s perspective they are not achieving what they want Continue reading >>

Should Everyone With Diabetes See An Endocrinologist?

Should Everyone With Diabetes See An Endocrinologist?

I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes by my primary-care doctor. Do I need to see a specialist? In general, if you have uncomplicated type 2 diabetes, your primary-care doctor can manage your diabetes care. But I do recommend, especially for new-onset diabetes, that you ask your primary-care doctor to refer you to one particular kind of specialist—a certified diabetes educator (CDE). Among other things, a CDE is specially trained to be able to advise you on lifestyle changes, such as proper nutrition and how much and what kinds of physical activity will help you manage your blood sugar and avoid diabetic complications. Having a CDE assist you with these and other time-consuming elements of treatment relieves some of the burden of care from your doctor, who is not likely to have as much time available during a regular office visit. That’s why a CDE needs to be a key part of your health-care team. Type 1 diabetes is a different story. Anyone who has type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder, should have an endocrinologist on his/her health-care team. An endocrinologist is able to oversee the tightly structured treatment program necessary to manage type 1 diabetes and deal with such things as high-tech insulin pumps, continuous glucose-monitoring devices and so forth. Some people with type 2 diabetes also should see an endocrinologist. See one if… • You’re having trouble controlling your blood sugar. • You and your primary-care doctor are finding it difficult to find the right mix of medications to control your blood sugar without worrisome side effects, including low blood sugar. • You need to take three or more insulin injections per day or use an insulin pump. Even if your type 2 diabetes doesn’t include the above challenges, it makes sense to cons Continue reading >>

What Is Endocrinology?

What Is Endocrinology?

Endocrinology is the field of hormone-related diseases. An endocrinologist can diagnose and treat hormone problems and the complications that arise from them. Hormones regulate metabolism, respiration, growth, reproduction, sensory perception, and movement. Hormone imbalances are the underlying reason for a wide range of medical conditions. Endocrinology focuses both on the hormones and the many glands and tissues that produce them. Humans have over 50 different hormones. They can exist in very small amounts and still have a significant impact on bodily function and development. Contents of this article: Here are some key points about endocrinology. More information is in the main article. Endocrinology involves a wide range of systems within the human body. The endocrine tissues include the adrenal gland, hypothalamus, ovaries, and testes. There are three broad groups of endocrine disorders. Polycystic ovary syndrome is the most common endocrine disorder in women. What is the endocrine system? The human endocrine system consists of a number of glands, which release hormones to control many different functions. When the hormones leave the glands, they enter the bloodstream and are transported to organs and tissues in every part of the body. Adrenal glands The adrenal, or suprarenal, glands are located on top of the kidneys. They are divided into two regions. The right gland is triangular, and the left is crescent-shaped. The adrenal glands secrete: corticosteroids, the steroids involved in stress responses, the immune system, inflammation, and more catecholamines, such as norepinephrine and epinephrine, in response to stress aldosterone, which affects kidney function Both men and women have some androgen, but men have higher levels. Androgens control the development of Continue reading >>

Why Should I See An Endocrinologist If I Have Diabetes?

Why Should I See An Endocrinologist If I Have Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, seeing an endocrinologist is important because they specialize in diabetes and metabolism, and have the latest information on the issues that impact the disease. Watch as endocrinologist Reza Yavari, MD, describes his specialty. An endocrinologist is a physician who specializes in treating diseases of the hormone-producing glands. As insulin is a hormone, diabetes is considered a hormonal disorder. Endocrinologists also treat thyroid disease, pituitary disorders, high or low blood calcium, adrenal problems, and low testosterone or other sex hormone disorders. Some endocrinologists specialize in fertility issues, including the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome, a common condition in women of childbearing age that often coexists with prediabetes. In many areas of the country there is a shortage of endocrinologists, particularly given the rapid increase in the prevalence of diabetes. Most people with type 2 diabetes will not need to see an endocrinologist, but many people with type 1 diabetes and those with type 2 who have had difficulty managing their blood sugar levels will benefit from seeing someone in this specialty. The Best Life Guide to Managing Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes Bob Greene has helped millions of Americans become fit and healthy with his life-changing Best Life plan. Now, for the first time, Oprah's trusted expert on diet and fitness teams up with a leading... Continue reading >>

What Is An Endocrinologist?

What Is An Endocrinologist?

Endocrinology is a complex study of the various hormones and their actions and disorders in the body. Glands are organs that make hormones. These are substances that help to control activities in the body and have several effects on the metabolism, reproduction, food absorption and utilization, growth and development etc. Hormones also control the way an organism responds to their surroundings and help by providing adequate energy for various functions. The glands that make up the endocrine system include the pineal, hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, thymus, adrenals, pancreas, ovaries and testes. Who is an endocrinologist? An endocrinologist is a specially trained doctor who has a basic training in Internal Medicine as well. Some disorders like low thyroid hormone production or hypothyroidism deals only with an endocrine organ and an endocrinologist alone may detect, diagnose and manage such patients. Yet other disorders may have endocrine as well and other origins like infertility and may need a deeper understanding of medicine on the part of the endocrinologist to identify and work in collaboration with another specialist (a gynaecologist in cases of infertility). What do endocrinologists do? Endocrinologists have the training to diagnose and treat hormone imbalances and problems by helping to restore the normal balance of hormones in the body. The common diseases and disorders of the endocrine system that endocrinologists deal with include diabetes mellitus and thyroid disorders. Diabetes mellitus This is one of the most common conditions seen by endocrinologists. This results due to inadequate insulin hormone secreted by the pancreas leading to excess blood sugar that damages various organs. Endocrinologists treat diabetes with diet and blood sugar red Continue reading >>

Value Of An Endocrinologist

Value Of An Endocrinologist

When you are facing a diagnosis of a hormonal condition, like diabetes or thyroid disease, your doctor may suggest you see an endocrinologist. You may be wondering why you need to see a specialist instead of simply sticking with your primary doctor. Here are some reasons why an endocrinologist will provide the level of support and care that you need with this diagnosis. An Endocrinologist is a True Specialist An endocrinologist is a specialist who has thoroughly studied hormonal conditions and knows the best possible treatments, even when conventional treatments do not work well. Unlike a family doctor or general practitioner, an endocrinologist studies hormones and hormonal diseases in depth, and this specialist will be able to provide the best possible treatment. Most general practitioners have the skills necessary to diagnose and treat basic hormonal conditions, but sometimes the help of a specialist is needed. An Endocrinologist Helps Non-Traditional Patients Some patients have diseases that progress as the textbooks say they should. The standard treatments work and they are able to manage their conditions with oral or injected medication with minimal disruption to their day-to-day living. Other patients find that conventional treatment does not work. They stick with the treatments religiously, but they achieve no results. In these cases, an endocrinologist is necessary to ensure all possible treatment avenues are pursued. Some patients need unique care due to other health conditions that affect their hormonal conditions. They may have a genetic condition, like cystic fibrosis, that affects the way their bodies react to treatments. The traditional-path patients may not see the value of an endocrinologist. Those who are in one of the latter categories, however, do. I Continue reading >>

More in diabetes