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What Can A Diabetic Eat For A Snack

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

NEW! Download our free grocery shopping companions: Free Foods – a guide to foods that won’t impact your blood sugar 15 Carbs Snack List – a mega-list of great snack ideas What’s the best snack for someone with diabetes? A snack with few carbs! (There are some exceptions. If you are planning on working out or have low blood sugar, than some carbohydrates may be beneficial.) Here are our top 23 favorite low-carb snacks in no particular order: Peanut butter Cheddar cheese String cheese Cottage cheese Broccoli with melted cheese Salad with free veggies and low-carb dressing Tomato and mozzarella salad Celery with peanut butter Fresh strawberries or blueberries with low-fat plain yogurt Veggies with hummus Cucumbers with olive-oil and rice vinegar Carrot sticks Snap peas with Caesar dressing Green beans cooked and cooled with lemon juice Nuts Sauteed Spinach Pickles Rotisserie chicken Deli meat Pepperoni and cheese Beef jerky Hard boiled eggs What are your favorites? You can get more snack ideas in our recipes forum, diabetes cookbook, and the Simply Cooking blog. Further reading on diabetes diet: Read more about low blood glucose/sugar (hypoglycemia), low-carb diet, snacks. Continue reading >>

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes Small Snacks

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes Small Snacks

Healthy snack ideas for people with type 2 diabetes Small Snacks If you have type 2 diabetes, a snack can help you manage your blood glucose levels. If your Registered Dietitian suggests that a small snack fits into your diabetes meal plan, youll find many healthy ideas below. Your snack choices should be based on the four food groups in Canadas Food Guide . The amount of carbohydrate in your snack is very important since carbohydrate-rich foods make the biggest difference to blood glucose levels. Smaller snacks should have about 15 grams of carbohydrate. This is the amount found in one slice of bread or one small apple. Carbohydrates are also found in sugary sweets like pastries, chocolate bars and candy. Because they are not very nutritious, they should be chosen less often, if at all. Heres a good rule to remember when choosing carbohydrate -rich foods: Choose more vegetables, fruit, legumes and whole grains like oats , barley, brown rice and whole wheat. Choose fewer products that are made from sugar, white flour and white rice. The smaller snacks listed below have about 15 grams of carbohydrate each. They each have 85-150 calories. Your eating plan may include a snack in the morning or the mid-afternoon. Here are some delicious options. 1 slice whole grain bread with 10 mL (2 tsp) peanut butter 1 small orange and 175 mL ( cup) edamame (green soybeans in the pod) 250 mL (1 cup) latte, cappuccino, unsweetened cocoa or chai tea made with skim milk 250 mL (1 cup) cantaloupe with 125 mL ( cup) low fat cottage cheese 15 baby carrots with 30 mL (2 tbsp) hummus These snacks can be left in your briefcase, knapsack, car or your desk drawer. They will come in handy when you have a very busy day and need to grab a quick snack. 1 single-serve (125 mL) unsweetened applesauce sp Continue reading >>

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

Lori Kenyon is a certified nutritional consultant, personal trainer, and co-founder of Ritual Cleanse. She was diagnosed early on in her life with a disorder that prevented her from consuming animal protein and has since had to adapt her diet to compensate. Kenyon advises clients to consume snacks which contain no more than 20 grams of carbohydrates and 140 milligrams of sodium per serving, in accordance with American Diabetes Association guidelines. Stella Metsovas is a certified clinical nutritionist who specializes in food science and human nutrition, with more than 23 years of experience in the field. She is a strong believer in the Paleo-Mediterranean diet and runs a private practice in Los Angeles. Angela Shelf Medearis is the author of The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook and has been featured frequently on The Dr. Oz Show as a guest chef, where she is known simply as The Kitchen Diva. She offers some great general snacking advice from her cookbook: Portion sizes are key. Keeping the glycemic load down (a measurement of how much food spikes blood glucose levels) means cutting down on portion sizes, since the measurement accounts for the number of grams of carbohydrates per serving of a food item, which of course will increase with portion sizes. Eating huge portions of even healthy snacks can quickly turn them unhealthy. Snacks between meals can help you reduce portion sizes at main meals and also keep blood sugar levels more stable throughout the day. This can keep you feeling energized and in a good mood as you go about your day. To help control portion sizes, Medearis suggests using small plates, consuming plenty of water while snacking or during meals, and limiting snacks to 100-calorie portions, when feasible, and otherwise just avoiding the habit of eating Continue reading >>

Between-meal Snacks

Between-meal Snacks

People with diabetes on certain types of tablets or insulin may require one snack between each meal and for supper. However, most people aiming to control their body weight are advised not to have snacks between meals. For specific advice, discuss this with your doctor, dietitian or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. There are lots of healthy choices that can be used as snack foods. Select fruit that is in season (e.g. an apple, a banana, a peach, a pear, 3 apricots, 1/2 a cup of grapes, and 1 cup of strawberries or a slice of rockmelon or watermelon). Other suggestions are listed below: Fruits Fresh or tinned fruit (e.g. 1 peach, 3 apricots, 1 pear, 2 mandarins, grapes, 1/2 a mango, 3 plums, 1 banana, 1 orange, 1 circle of pineapple) Frozen fruit Frozen fruit juice cubes 1 serve of dried fruit Salads & Vegetables Vegetable sticks (e.g. celery, carrot, capsicum, snow peas) with 1 tbsp low fat dip. Celery boats filled with 2 tbsp of cottage cheese and tomato Nuts 30 grams of mixed or unsalted nuts Breads 1 slice of raisin toast or multigrain bread Dairy Products 1 tub of low-fat yoghurt 1 cup of low-fat custard Cereal 1/2 cup of high fibre breakfast cereal Drinks 1 cup or 250 mls of any low fat flavoured milk or soy milk or fruit smoothie 1 café latté Cakes 1 small pikelet or wholemeal crumpet with 1 tsp of jam 1 small fruit or plain scone with 1 tsp of jam Savoury Treats 30 grams of salt reduced pretzels Rice cakes or wheat biscuits topped with cottage cheese, tomato and chives 1 cup of plain popcorn Savoury Bread 1/2 English muffin with tomato slices and 1 slice of reduced-fat cheese. 2 toasted pita bread triangles with 1 tbsp low fat tomato salsa dip. 1 small low fat savoury muffin e.g. reduced fat cheese and tomato Others 2 small sushi rolls (avoid using soy sauce) 1 Continue reading >>

Smart Snacking With Diabetes

Smart Snacking With Diabetes

When you feel the urge to snack, its easy to satisfy your cravings with something sweet and salty. A box of cookies or bag of chips quenches that hunger. But with a little creativity and determination, snacking can be a healthy quest that helps keep your blood glucose steady while adding important vitamins and minerals to your diet. When we think of snacking, we usually think of it as something unhealthy or a mini-meal, said registered dietitian Angela Ginn-Meadow, CDE , senior education coordinator at the University of Maryland Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology in Baltimore. The purpose of snacking is to get us from one meal to the next. It shouldnt be a full-course meal, but a tiny meal that contains carbohydrates and protein. Ginn-Meadow, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, recommends following the 80-20 rule for snacking: 80% of snacks should be healthy to maintain your weight and blood glucose levels and 20% can be slight indulgences. Snacking is driven by both physical and emotional impulses and its the mindless snacking that gets us all into trouble, she added. In the past, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommended three meals and three snacks a day. Currently, the ADA recognizes that there is not a one-size-fits-all approach to eating and therefore recommends three meals a day and allows more flexibility on whether people choose to eat snacks. Driving past fast food to instead opt for healthy snacks may seem impossible. If you add quick and easy to that list, it can feel downright overwhelming. Where to start? Check with your doctor, dietitian, or CDE to find out how many complex carbohydrates a day is right for you. Generally, consuming 250 grams of complex carbohydrates in a 2,000-calorie-per-day diet will leave you with a Continue reading >>

Snacking When You Have Diabetes

Snacking When You Have Diabetes

Learning how to count the carbohydrates that you eat (carb counting) helps you plan what to eat. It will also keep your blood sugar under control. Your health care provider may tell you to eat a snack at certain times of the day, most often at bedtime. This helps keep your blood sugar from getting too low at night. Other times, you may have a snack before or during exercise for the same reason. Ask your provider about the snacks you can and you can't have. Needing to snack to prevent low blood sugar has become much less common because of new types of insulin that are better at matching the insulin your body needs at specific times. If you have type 2 diabetes and are taking insulin and often need to snack during the day, your doses of insulin may be too high and you should talk to your provider about this. You will also need to ask about what snacks to avoid. Your provider can tell you if you should snack at certain times to keep from having low blood sugar. This will be based on your: Diabetes treatment plan from your provider Expected physical activity Lifestyle Low blood sugar pattern Most often, your snacks will be easy to digest foods that have 15 to 45 grams of carbohydrates. Snack foods that have 15 grams (g) of carbohydrates are: Half cup (107 g) of canned fruit (without the juice or syrup) Half banana One medium apple One cup (173 g) melon balls Two small cookies Ten potato chips (varies with size of chips) Six jelly beans (varies with size of pieces) Having diabetes does not mean that you must stop eating snacks. It does mean that you should know what a snack does to your blood sugar. You also need to know what healthy snacks are so you can choose a snack that will not raise your blood sugar or make you gain weight. Ask your provider about what snacks you can Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes Written by Brianna Elliott, RD on January 14, 2018 Choosing healthy snacks can be difficult when you have diabetes. The key is to choose snacks that are high in fiber, protein and healthy fats. These nutrients will help keep your blood sugar levels under control. Its also important to snack on nutrient-dense foods that promote overall health. This article discusses 21 excellent snacks to eat if you have diabetes. Hard-boiled eggs are a super healthy snack for people with diabetes. Their protein content really makes them shine. One large hard-boiled egg provides 6 grams of protein, which is helpful for diabetes because it keeps your blood sugar from rising too high after you eat ( 1 , 2 ). In one study, 65 people with type 2 diabetes ate two eggs daily for 12 weeks. By the end of the study, they experienced significant reductions in their fasting blood sugar levels. They also had lower hemoglobin A1c, which is a measure of long-term blood sugar control ( 3 ). Eggs are known to promote fullness, an important aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. This disease is associated with a greater likelihood of becoming overweight and developing heart disease ( 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ). You can enjoy a hard-boiled egg or two for a snack on their own, or garnish them with a healthy topping like guacamole. Yogurt with berries is an excellent diabetes-friendly snack for a variety of reasons. First, the antioxidants in berries may reduce inflammation and prevent damage to cells of the pancreas, the organ responsible for releasing hormones that lower blood sugar levels ( 8 , 9 ). Additionally, berries are a great source of fiber. For example, a 1-cup (148-gram) serving of blueberries provides 4 grams of fiber, which helps slow digestion and stabilize bl Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Are late-night snacks a no-no for people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes, late-night snacks aren't necessarily off-limits — but it's important to make wise choices. Late-night snacks add extra calories, which can lead to weight gain. And if you snack after your evening meal — especially if the foods contain carbohydrates — you may wake up the next morning with a high blood sugar level. If you're hungry after dinner, choose a "free" food, such as: One sugar-free frozen cream pop Five baby carrots One cup of light popcorn A small handful of goldfish-style crackers A can of diet soda Or swap the snack for a piece of gum or small hard candy. These "free" foods have few, if any, carbohydrates and calories, so they won't contribute to weight gain or increased blood sugar. If you take insulin or other diabetes medications and feel that you must snack before bedtime to prevent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during the night, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend adjusting the dose of your medications to prevent the need for a late-night snack. Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Eating With Diabetes: Smart Snacking

Whether you want to lose weight or simply eat healthier, enjoying a couple of snacks each day is a smart habit for many people. Eating a planned snack between meals can help curb your hunger (and therefore prevent overeating at mealtime) and also increase your energy levels when you need a boost. Snacks offer an additional benefit for people with type 2 diabetes: They can help optimize your blood glucose control. So if you haven't incorporated snacks into your diabetes meal plan yet, now may be the time to start. Here's what you need to know to snack smart, along with some carbohydrate-controlled snack ideas you can try today! Our Best Articles, Delivered Get expert advice on Diabetes from our coaches and trainers The number of snacks a person with diabetes should eat during the day depends largely on your eating preferences, your weight-management goals, and the timing of your major meals. People with diabetes can eat snacks throughout the day for a number of reasonssimply enjoying a mid-morning snack or planning them into their day for better blood glucose control. Exactly how many snacks you should eatand when you eat themis very individualized. Meeting with a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator is the best way to make sure your diabetes meal plan meets your needs. However, here are a few basic guidelines that can be helpful when planning snacks. How many hours pass between your meals? In general, people with diabetes who want to optimize blood glucose control should not go longer than five hours without eating. If you consistently eat your main meals every 4 to 5 hours, then you may not need any snacks between meals. However, if your main meals are generally spaced out at longer intervals, snacking between meals can help you achieve your best blood Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes can lead to a wide range of symptoms including high blood pressure, circulation issues, kidney damage, blindness, and skin problems. But the right diet can help manage these symptoms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes can keep blood sugar in check. They may also help reduce the severity of diabetes symptoms such as high blood pressure. Eating right can feel daunting, particularly at first, but people with diabetes can continue enjoying a wide range of snacks. Foods high in protein High-protein foods include nuts, legumes, animal products such as eggs and cheese, and alternatives to meat such as tofu and mushrooms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes that are satisfying and rich in protein include: roasted chickpeas apples or celery with almond butter almonds, walnuts, or pistachios trail mix, particularly if it doesn't contain sweetened ingredients hard-boiled eggs plain yogurt, particularly Greek yogurt low-sodium cottage cheese mixed with fresh fruit diced avocado and cherry tomatoes snap peas or other raw veggies with hummus Several of these options can work well as both sweet and savory snacks. Honey-roasted chickpeas provide a good balance of sweet and savory. Nuts can be paired with slices of cheese or dried fruit. Adding nuts or fruit can also make yogurt sweeter or more savory. For the turkey roll-ups, people can use thinly sliced turkey or lettuce to replace the pita. Adding hummus and vegetables makes for a hearty snack. High-fiber snacks Vegetables, legumes, and nuts are excellent sources of fiber. Whole grains, oats, and some fruits are as well. People with diabetes can try some of these high-fiber snacks: smoothies blended with high-fiber, non-starchy vegetables sprouted, whole-grain breads whole-grain or bean pastas oatmeal, mixed wi Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

My mom, who has diabetes, likes having her tea and a snack before bedtime. Is eating a slice of American or cheddar cheese good for her? Continue reading >>

Food To Eat At Night For Diabetics

Food To Eat At Night For Diabetics

Diabetics should understand the nutritional values of food, especially for nighttime meals and snacks, in order to come up with a strategy to keep blood glucose levels under control. Proper spacing of meals and snacks throughout the day provides a more gradual amount of glucose to your body. A meal plan helps with this by letting you figure out when and how much to eat and what time to eat to keep the blood glucose in your target range. Video of the Day According to the Mayo Clinic, late-night eating is fine for diabetics, but you have to make the right choices at night because snacks have extra calories, which can cause weight gain. Also, an after-dinner snack containing carbohydrates may increase your glucose levels overnight. The Mayo Clinic recommends eating a "free" food as a late-night snack, such as a diet drink, sugar-free gelatin, carrots, saltine crackers or a vanilla wafer. Free foods have few or no calories or carbohydrates. Also acceptable is chewing gum or a piece of hard candy. Taste of Home magazine recommends raw vegetables such as bell pepper strips, cauliflower or broccoli florets, celery, carrots, cucumbers, radishes or even zucchini as a light snack, because these foods have few carbohydrates, which helps you keep blood glucose levels under control. If you don't have fresh raw vegetables on hand, the magazine suggests other snack options, such as a granola bar, six saltine crackers, eight plain animal crackers, a box of raisins, a small bag of reduced-fat potato chips, three gingersnap cookies or five vanilla wafers. Going out to eat at dinnertime can be a challenge for diabetics because what you eat and when you eat it can have an effect on your blood glucose levels. In a restaurant, you have little control over the timing of food delivery. You nee Continue reading >>

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