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What Body Systems Does Diabetes Affect

7 Ways Diabetes Affects The Body

7 Ways Diabetes Affects The Body

Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to a multitude of complications because the disease affects the body in many ways. With this condition, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes a buildup of sugars in your blood, which can wreak havoc on your body. Here what diabetes can do to your body. Having diabetes increases your risk of developing a multitude of heart disease problems, such as chest pain, high cholesterol, narrowing of the arteries, and high blood pressure. Many of these problems may be subtle or be “silent” until a major event, such as a heart attack or stroke. Diabetes remains the leading cause of vision loss in the U.S. It can lead to various eye problems, including glaucoma, cataracts, and diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes can cause wounds or sores in the skin to heal more slowly, which can result in people with diabetes being more susceptible to infections. Kidney disease is one more potential complication of poorly controlled diabetes, and, unfortunately, it can develop over a number of years before symptoms show. Symptoms include swelling of the legs and feet. Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure among adults in the U.S. When someone with diabetes has excess sugar in their urine, they become prone to more urinary track infections. Nearly 70 percent of people with diabetes will suffer from nerve damage. High blood sugar levels can harm nerves, and can develop either peripheral diabetic neuropathy (usually starting in the toes or feet) or autonomic neuropathy (damage to the nerves that control internal organs). Diabetic neuropathy is one of the main causes of erectile dysfunction as well. Well-controlled diabetes can keep all these effects at bay and even stop them. To better con Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect The Body System

How Does Diabetes Affect The Body System

Diabetes, also referred to as diabetes mellitus, is a metabolic disease in which a person has high blood sugar as a result of a defective pancreas or as a result of cells not responding to the insulin that is produced. There are three main types of diabetes that people experience: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. Needless to say, diabetes is a complex disease that affects the entire body. Many people may be wondering, “How does diabetes affect the body?” Diabetes can affect the body in a number of ways. Diabetes increases blood pressure. High blood pressure is bad enough on its own; however, when it is paired with diabetes, it is an even worse problem. As a result of increased blood pressure, the heart becomes affected and the risk of heart attacks and cardiovascular diseases drastically increases. Because of the increased blood pressure, diabetes can also lead to a stroke. As well, diabetes also affects the eyes. Diabetes can cause the blood vessels in the back of eyes to swell and leak. This ailment is referred to as diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a result of uncontrolled diabetes or poorly managed diabetes over a number of years. In addition, high blood pressure also plays a part in diabetic retinopathy. Thankfully, diabetic retinopathy can be treated if it is detected early. The best way to detect the condition is to receive a retinopathy screening. Diabetes also affects the kidneys. Poorly managed or uncontrolled diabetes can lead to kidney disease. Kidney disease that results from diabetes is referred to as diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is essentially the deterioration of the kidneys. Also, of course, kidney disease is a serious problem within itself, which can lead to kidney failure. Receiving a nephropath Continue reading >>

Body Areas Affected By Diabetes

Body Areas Affected By Diabetes

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure dizziness or fainting Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not b Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Body

Diabetes And The Body

Diabetes affects the body and the body affects diabetes. Click on a body system or body part and see the role that organs, hormones and responses play in ensuring the body functions and how diabetes can affect them. How do I use this? This section looks at the different systems in the body, how the body’s organs work and how they can be affected by diabetes. The pancreas is recognised by many of us as having an effect on blood sugar levels but there are many more organs which play a role in diabetes. Choose a system by hovering over it and see the role that different organs, hormones and responses play in ensuring the body functions. Guides to hormones, bodily processes or biological functions can be under the biological system that they are most relevant to. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40 Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Body‘s Energy Systems And How They Impact Your Exercise Blood Sugar Levels

Understanding Your Body‘s Energy Systems And How They Impact Your Exercise Blood Sugar Levels

We go to the gas pumps and fill up our car and then just press on the pedal and the car goes. But do you really know how that gas ends up moving your car? Did you know the same thing happens in your body Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM, explains how your body’s energy system works whenever you exercise. Read Understanding Your Body‘s Energy Systems and How They Impact Your Exercise Blood Sugar Levels to learn how your engines get fuel. The way that your muscles make and use energy during physical activities, including how fast you move, how much force your muscles produce, and how long the activity lasts, can also affect your blood sugar levels. Your body has three distinct energy systems to supply your muscles with ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is a high-energy compound found in all cells that directly fuels muscular work. The three systems can best be considered a continuum, with one, then the next, and finally the third being recruited to produce ATP as exercise continues. If you exercise long enough (even for just a minute), you will end up using all three to some extent. All the systems work by causing increased production of ATP, the only direct source of energy that your muscles can use; its breakdown directly fuels all contractions. When a nerve impulse initiates a muscle contraction, calcium is released within your recruited muscle cells, ATP “energizes” the muscle fibers, and they go into action. Without ATP, your muscles can’t contract and you won’t be able to exercise. Muscle cells contain only small quantities of ATP ready for use when you start, enough to fuel any activity for about a second, at best. If you want to keep going longer, your muscles need to get ATP from another source right away. Although all the systems can supply addition Continue reading >>

Complications Of Diabetes – A Disease Affecting All Organs

Complications Of Diabetes – A Disease Affecting All Organs

We’re treating people with type 2 diabetes completely wrong – and it’s harming every organ in their bodies. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may be the hallmark of diabetes, but does not cause most of the morbidity (the harm of the disease). Blood glucose is fairly easily controlled by medication, but this does not prevent the long-term complications. Despite blood glucose control, damage occurs to virtually every organ system. It would be difficult to find a single organ system NOT affected by diabetes. These complications are generally classified as either microvascular (small blood vessels) or macrovascular (large blood vessels). Certain organs, such as the eyes, kidneys and nerves are predominantly perfused by small blood vessels. Chronic damage to these small blood vessels causes failure of these organs. Damage to larger blood vessels results in narrowing called atherosclerotic plaque. When this plaque ruptures, it triggers an inflammatory reaction and blood clots that cause heart attacks and strokes. When blood flow is impaired to the legs, it may cause gangrene due to reduced circulation. There are other complications do not fall neatly into this simple categorization. A variety of diabetic complications are not obviously caused by injured blood vessels. These would include skin conditions, fatty liver disease, infections, polycystic ovarian syndromes, Alzheimer’s disease and cancer. Microvascular Complications Retinopathy Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in the United States, according to the Center for Disease Control in 2011. Eye disease, characteristically retinal damage (retinopathy) is one of the most frequent complications of diabetes. The retina is the light-sensitive nerve layer at the back of the eye that sends its ‘pict Continue reading >>

Animation: Diabetes And Your Body

Animation: Diabetes And Your Body

Having either type 1 or type 2 diabetes can put you at increased risk of developing several other health problems. These diabetic complications are mainly caused by the long-term effects of raised blood sugar levels on blood vessels and nerves, and develop over many years. Our animation shows how diabetes complications can affect your body. However, keep in mind that tight control of blood glucose levels (along with control of other risk factors, such as high blood pressure and raised cholesterol) can help prevent these complications from developing, and slow their progression if they do develop. 1. Brain Having diabetes can increase your risk of having stroke. This is because increased blood glucose levels can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis (hardening and narrowing of the arteries), which can lead to a stroke when it affects the arteries that supply blood to your brain. 1. Brain Having diabetes can increase your risk of having a stroke. This is because increased blood glucose levels can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis (hardening and narrowing of the arteries), which can lead to a stroke when it affects the arteries that supply blood to your brain. 2. Eyes High blood sugar levels can damage the blood vessels that supply your retina (the light-sensitive part of the eye that relays images to your brain), resulting in a condition called diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes can also increase your risk of developing cataracts (clouding of the lens within your eye) and glaucoma (increased fluid pressure within the eyeball). These conditions can cause blurred or reduced vision, as well as loss of eyesight if left untreated. 3. Heart Raised blood sugar levels can promote atherosclerosis (hardening and narrowing of the arteries). When atherosclerosis Continue reading >>

Role Of Multiple Organs And Tissues In Type 2 Diabetes

Role Of Multiple Organs And Tissues In Type 2 Diabetes

SHARE RATE★★★★★ Type 2 diabetes is increasingly seen as a disease in which multiple organs and tissues in the body play a role in causing high blood glucose. In fact, nowadays when researchers consider type 2 diabetes, they think of the “ominous octet” or organs and tissues that work together to contribute to elevated blood glucose. This octet includes1: Muscle Fat cells Liver Beta cells in the pancreas Alpha cells in the pancreas Intestine Kidney Brain Muscle tissue. Muscle tissue throughout the body contribute to elevated blood glucose by becoming resistant to insulin and unable to take up glucose for cellular energy needs. Fat cells. Fat cells in people with type 2 diabetes exhibit increased breakdown of fats and other lipids that contributes insulin resistance and increases fat deposits throughout the body. Liver. In type 2 diabetes, the liver—a major site of glucose storage—attempts to compensate for the decreased ability of the body to use glucose and increases glucose production. Pancreas (beta and alpha cells). Both alpha cells and beta cells in the pancreas play a central role in type 2 diabetes. Beta cells lose the ability to produce insulin, while alpha cells increase production of glucagon, the hormone that plays a role in transforming glycogen stored in the liver and muscles back into glucose. Additionally, beta cells also produce the hormone amylin, which controls how quickly glucose is released into the blood stream after eating. Intestine. Gastrointestinal tissues in the intestine become deficient in producing the hormones called incretins and resistant to its effects. Incretins stimulate the body to produce insulin after eating and also slow emptying of the stomach, which promotes the feeling of fullness and delays the release of gluco Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect The Body?

How Does Diabetes Affect The Body?

Diabetes is a life-long disease that can't be cured. But it can be managed. It's easier to do this if you understand what's going on in your body. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder. This means it's a disease that affects how your body uses food for energy and growth. Here's how things work in a person without diabetes: When you eat, your body breaks food down into glucose. Glucose is a type of sugar that is your body's main source of energy. Glucose from food goes into your bloodstream. Your blood glucose (the amount of sugar in your blood) begins to rise. As your blood glucose rises, your pancreas responds by releasing a hormone called insulin. Insulin allows glucose to cross out of your bloodstream and go into your body's cells -- it's like a key that "unlocks" the cells. Once glucose gets in your cells, it's used for energy. Your liver also plays a role in the metabolic process. It stores glucose from your bloodstream and releases it when your cells need fuel (as, for example, when you haven't eaten for a while). When you have eaten, however, insulin blocks this release of glucose from your liver. When you have diabetes, your body still breaks down the food you eat into glucose. The problem is that your body doesn't have the right amount of insulin. The reasons for this depend on the type of diabetes you have, type 1 or type 2. But with both types of diabetes, the end result is the same: Your cells are starved for energy. Without an insulin "key" to help move glucose into your cells, you feel weak, hungry, and thirsty -- just plain awful. You'll also have ketones in your blood and urine (pee). Ketones are a sign that your body is breaking down fat and protein to get energy, since it's not able to use glucose normally. High levels of ketones are harmful to your body. Y Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Homeostasis?

How Does Diabetes Affect Homeostasis?

A little Something About Diabetes Diabetes is a health condition that affects the ability of your body to deal with your blood sugar. Your blood sugar comes from the food you eat. To break this sugar into energy, your body needs a hormone called “insulin”. Insulin is a chemical your body produces that helps you break sugar down into energy. What is homeostasis? Homeostasis is a combination of two words: homeo means “similar” and stasis means “stable”. In other words, homeostasis is the ability for something to remain stable. Here is an example for you to understand better. Take your body for example. When you feel hot, you start to sweat. Your sweat is basically a way your body uses to cool you down. This way, your body does not allow your temperature to rise even in summers. In other words, your body maintains a balance or homeostasis. Why Does Diabetes Affects Homeostasis? Your temperature is just one example of how the system tries to maintain a balance of every process in your body. There is so much going on inside your body, if it were not for your closely monitored homeostasis, survival wouldn’t be possible. This is how the human body evolved over thousands of years. But diabetes affects this state of balance in your body. When you have diabetes, it means a lot of extra sugar in your system, which is just there doing nothing. Excess of everything is bad and same is true for excess of sugar. When something disturbs your bodies homeostasis, you should expect some consequences. It’s like you’re crashing your car into something. When that happens, you should expect some damages to your vehicle. Similarly, the following are some outcomes of excess sugar in your body: Extra sugar damages your brain. It hurts your heart. It makes you pee more. You eat m Continue reading >>

Your Cardiovascular System And Diabetes

Your Cardiovascular System And Diabetes

Cardiovascular system is one of the most important systems in the human body. It is comprised of the heart, blood and blood vessels. Blood is being pumped out from the heart and is the one responsible in delivering oxygen and other nutrients to all the parts of the body. It also cleans up our body by picking up the waste products on its way back to the heart so our body can get rid of them. So what has diabetes got to do with the cardiovascular system? Since blood is part of the cardiovascular system, and diabetes is a condition in which the level of glucose in the blood is higher than normal, then there must be some relationship between the two. Diabetes and cardiovascular system diseases has been recognized to be closely related to each other for some time now due to the so-called insulin resistance syndrome or metabolic syndrome. Among the 20 million people in the United States who has diabetes, around 5 to 6 million of this population who are aged 35 years and above were diagnosed to have a certain cardiovascular disease according to the National Diabetes Surveillance System. Some examples of the commonly diagnosed cardiovascular disease are coronary heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and other heart conditions. Cardiovascular diseases are the major cause now of deaths related to diabetes. In a study published few years back in the Journal of the American Medical Association, deaths due to some heart conditions went up by 23% in diabetic women despite the 27% drop of the same in non-diabetic women. As for diabetic men, there is only about 13% decrease in heart disease related deaths as compared to the 36% drop in non-diabetics. Thus, the two indeed go together. Risk Factors Diabetes is now considered by the American Heart Association a major risk factor in c Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Eyes, Heart, Nerves, Feet, And Kidneys

Diabetes And Your Eyes, Heart, Nerves, Feet, And Kidneys

Diabetes is a serious disease that can affect your eyes, heart, nerves, feet and kidneys. Understanding how diabetes affects your body is important. It can help you follow your treatment plan and stay as healthy as possible. If your diabetes is not well controlled, the sugar level in your blood goes up. This is called “hyperglycemia” (high blood sugar). High blood sugar can cause damage to very small blood vessels in your body. Imagine what happens to sugar when it is left unwrapped overnight. It gets sticky. Now imagine how sugar “sticks” to your small blood vessels and makes it hard for blood to get to your organs. Damage to blood vessels occurs most often in the eyes, heart, nerves, feet, and kidneys. Let’s look at how this damage happens. Eyes. Having high levels of sugar in your blood for a long time can harm the tiny blood vessels in your eyes. This can result in vision problems or blindness. Heart. High blood sugar may also harm larger blood vessels in your body that supply oxygen to your heart and brain. Fat can build up in the blood vessels as well. This can lead to a heart attack or stroke. Nerves. Nerves carry important messages between your brain and other parts of your body. Having high levels of sugar in your blood for many years can damage the blood vessels that bring oxygen to some nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending pain signals. Feet. Diabetes can harm your feet in two ways. First, it can damage your body’s nerves. Nerve damage stops you from feeling pain or other problems in your feet. Another way that diabetes can cause damage to your feet is from poor blood circulation. Poor blood flow makes it hard for a sore or infection to heal. If sores don’t heal and get infected, it can lead to amputation. Kidneys. Think of your kidneys like Continue reading >>

Leg, Foot, And Organ Damage With Diabetes

Leg, Foot, And Organ Damage With Diabetes

Healthy nerves carry messages to our muscles and organs. Having high blood sugar levels for a long time can damage nerves throughout the body. Also, the older people get and the longer they have diabetes, the more likely they are to have some nerve damage. When nerves become damaged, they can't send messages, the messages they send get interrupted, or the messages get mixed up. This is a condition called diabetic neuropathy. High blood sugar affects: Long nerves from the spinal cord that allow us to move and feel. Smaller nerves that support our body organs including the heart, stomach, and bladder. Leg and Foot Damage Long nerves from the spinal cord send messages to the lower legs and feet. When blood sugar levels stay high, the nerve cells swell and scar. After a while, the nerves can't send messages to the legs and feet the way they should. When this happens, it can cause people to lose feeling in their legs and feet, making it hard to sense pressure or pain. It can also cause uncomfortable feelings in the arms and legs, like tingling, shooting pains, or aching. This condition is known as peripheral neuropathy. Damaged nerves can also affect the muscles in the legs and feet, causing them to lose shape. When muscles in the foot lose their shape, they aren't able to hold the bones and joints of the feet together, or they can pull up on the bones, causing the foot to become deformed. These kinds of changes can put pressure on parts of the foot that aren't meant for walking, making it harder and more painful to walk. Sometimes people lose feeling in their feet without realizing it. When people don't know they've lost feeling, it can lead to very serious foot problems, including wounds that won't heal. Treatment Ask your doctor or other member of your health care team to Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 1 diabetes. Other types of diabetes are covered separately (read about type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes, which affects some women during pregnancy). Symptoms of diabetes Typical symptoms of type 1 diabetes are: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk The symptoms of type 1 diabetes usually develop very quickly in young people (over a few days or weeks). In adults, the symptoms often take longer to develop (a few months). Read more about the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. These symptoms occur because the lack of insulin means that glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible, because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Find your local GP service Read about how type 1 diabetes is diagnosed. Causes of type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which means your immune system attacks healthy body tissue by mistake. In this case, it attacks the cells in your pancreas. Your damaged pancreas is then unable to produce insulin. So, glucose cannot be moved out of your bloodstream and into your cells. Type 1 diabetes is o Continue reading >>

Body Parts Affected By Diabetes

Body Parts Affected By Diabetes

What you’ll get from the post is the answer to all the below questions: What are the different body parts affected by diabetes? How does diabetes weaken the immune system? How is the endocrine system affected by diabetes? What is the effect of diabetes on the eye? How does diabetes affect kidneys? What is diabetic neuropathy? What are the cardiovascular diseases caused by diabetes? What is the effect of diabetes on the digestive systems? What is the effect of diabetes on the integumentary system? What is a diabetic foot? How is the circulatory system affected? In the following paragraphs, we shall deep dive and try to understand the answers to each of the questions above. Which are the Body Parts Affected by Diabetes? Diabetes is caused when the pancreas of the body is not able to produce insulin or the body is unable to utilize the insulin efficiently. Diabetes is often marked by an increase in the blood sugar level, giving rise to a lot of complications. Following are a few organs affected by diabetes: Kidneys and the urinary system. Circulatory system How does Diabetes Weaken the Immune System? It is said that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. When a person is affected by it, the immune system of the body begins to react against its own immune system. When our body is attacked by viruses, the T-cells of the body produce antibodies which help to fight against these viruses. Now sometimes, these antibodies act against the beta cells when both these types have the same property. It is the beta cell which is responsible for the production of insulin in the body. In type 2 diabetes, the body becomes resistant to insulin. This results in the release of cytokines. The fat cells thus lead to higher production of fatty acid in the blood, which ultimately results in Continue reading >>

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