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What Are The Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes: These Are The Early Warning Signs - Simplemost

Type 2 Diabetes: These Are The Early Warning Signs - Simplemost

According to the American Diabetes Association, 30.3 million people in the United Statesor 9.4 percent of all Americanshave diabetes. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diabetes cases. In 2017, the group estimated that 7.2 million Americans have diabetes but havent been diagnosed. And its a very serious disease which kills about 80,000 people in the U.S. every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . The good news is that type 2 diabetes is highly treatable . In fact, there have been cases of remission , in which all signs and symptoms disappear. Learning about the risks, symptoms and treatment can help you watch for signs of and perhaps even reduce your chances of getting this deadly disease. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body is unable to use insulin properly. Initially, your pancreas produces extra insulin to compensate, but eventually it is unable to make enough insulin to control the glucose levels in your blood. Glucose builds up in your cells and can eventually cause eye, kidney, nerve or heart problems. Unlike type 1 diabetes, which is unpreventable and hits its patients at random, often at a young age , type 2 diabetes can be prevented. Although there are risk factors you cannot control, such as a family history, age and ethnicity, other risk factors that lead to type 2 diabetes are related to lifestyle. If you think you are exhibiting signs of type 2 diabetes, if you have a body mass index of 25 or higher or if you are over 45,the ADA recommends seeking a screening from a health care professional. Your doctor may recommend testing your blood glucose level using several methods. You may be required to test twice in order to diagnose diabetes . A positive diagnosis can mean different things for different people Continue reading >>

15 Common Symptoms Of Type Ii Diabetes

15 Common Symptoms Of Type Ii Diabetes

Home Your Health 15 Common Symptoms of Type II Diabetes By: Catherine Roberts on Sunday, March 25th Over 25 million people in the U.S. have type 2 diabetes, however, the majority of individuals with diabetes are not aware they have the condition due to the fact that the symptoms , on their own, seem more like annoyances then signs of a dangerous condition. Your best hope is early diagnoses if you want to avoid serious diabetes complicationssuch as kidney disease, vision problems, and thyroid issues. Here are the 15 most common early warning signs of type 2 diabetes Numbness that starts as a tingling in the hands, fingers, legs, and feet is often an early warning sign of diabetes. This occurs due to an increase in blood sugar levels, causing blood vessel restriction to the extremities, and eventually damage to nerve fibers. For many, this numbness is often the first sign of any health issues. Diabetes numbness presents in a prickly, tingling, or pain in the hands and feet that starts out minor at first, but as the nerve damage progresses over times, and sometimes years, mild tingling can become chronic and quite painful, involving motor function, sensory, autonomic and involuntary nervous system response with a sudden and painful and numbness in the fingers, toes, feet, hands, legs, and arms, sometimes accompanied by muscle wasting of the hands and feet. If you have Type I or Type II diabetes, you're well aware that careand management of your chronic disease is a daily task. Diabetes. It's a word everyone has heard, whether they have it or someone they know has it. Diseases are no respecter of person, and celebrities certainly aren't immune to contracting, or developing diseases and ailments. Stress is a feeling most everyone is familiar with. While it may sometimes ser Continue reading >>

Summit Medical Group Web Site

Summit Medical Group Web Site

Having diabetes means that there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. Your body breaks down some of the foods you eat into sugar. Your blood carries the sugar to the cells of your body. You need the sugar in your cells for energy, but too much sugar in your blood is not good for your health. Diabetes is caused by a problem with the way your body makes or uses insulin. Insulin is made by the pancreas, which is an organ in your upper belly. Your body uses insulin to help move sugar from the blood into the cells. When you do not have enough insulin or you have trouble using the insulin your body makes, sugar builds up in your blood and cannot get into your cells. The 2 main types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes happens when your pancreas stops making insulin. It usually starts before the age of 35. Type 2 diabetes happens when the body gradually loses its ability to use its own insulin or stops making enough insulin. It usually starts in adulthood but can also start when you are a child. Doctors dont know how to prevent type 1 diabetes. However, type 2 diabetes, which is much more common than type 1, can often be prevented by controlling risk factors. You cannot change your family history or your age, but you can change your lifestyle. Choosing healthy foods, keeping a healthy weight, and getting regular exercise can keep you from developing type 2 diabetes. What are the risk factors for type 2 diabetes? Risk factors for type 2 diabetes that you cannot control include: A family background of Alaska Native, American Indian, African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian American, or Pacific Islander Gestational diabetes during pregnancy, or giving birth to a baby that weighed 9 pounds or more Risk factors that you may be able to control include: Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Easy To Miss

Early Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Easy To Miss

Type 2 diabetes is a sneaky devil. Early on, the warning signs can be hard to spot and people sometimes chalk them up to stress or fatigue, and shrug them off. But screening tests and understanding your risk can help people spot diabetes sooner and get the treatment they need, say experts. "The main thing about early diabetes is that you can have abnormal blood sugar for quite some time and be fairly asymptomatic," Dr. Susan Spratt, an endocrinologist and assistant professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine, told CBS News. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes - that's nearly 1 out of 10 U.S. adults - and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter of them are undiagnosed. Millions of others are considered at high risk for developing diabetes. Spratt said some people with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes may experience dry mouth, excessive thirst, and they may urinate more frequently. Blurry vision can occur, too. Cuts and bruises may be slow to heal and you may feel tingling, pain, or numbness in your hands and feet, according to the American Diabetes Association. Feeling hungry, even after eating, and experiencing extreme fatigue are symptoms, as well. What's happening in the body when type 2 diabetes is lurking? The condition develops when the body becomes resistant to insulin or when the pancreas stops producing enough insulin. It's not clear why this happens, but genetics and factors such as weight and a sedentary lifestyle can play into the equation, Mayo Clinic experts say. The body needs insulin to survive - it's secreted into the bloodstream via the pancreas. When insulin circulates, it enables sugar to enter cells and lowers the amount of sugar in the bloodstream. With type 2 diabetes, instead of insulin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This happens when the cells become insensitive to insulin and the blood sugar gradually gets too high. There are two types of diabetes mellitus, type 1 and type 2. In type 2, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the cells cannot use it very efficiently. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot make insulin due to auto-immune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Type 2 can be caused by: Lack of activity (sedentary behavior) Genetics Risk factors include: Being overweight Being sedentary including watching more than 2 hours of TV per day Drinking soda Consuming too much sugar and processed food The signs and symptoms of this type of this type of diabetes are sometimes subtle. The major symptom is often being overweight. Other symptoms and signs include: Urinating a lot Gaining or losing weight unintentionally Dark skin under armpits, chin, or groin Unusual odor to urine Blurry vision Often there are no specific symptoms of the condition and it goes undiagnosed until routine blood tests are ordered. A blood sugar level more than 125 when fasting or more than 200 randomly is a diagnosis for diabetes. Treatment is with diet and lifestyle changes that include eating less sugary foods, and foods that are high in simple carbohydrates (sugar, bread, and pasta.) Sometimes a person will need to take drugs, for example, metformin (Glucophage). People with both types of diabetes need monitor their blood sugar levels often to avoid high (hyperglycemia) and low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Complications include heart and kidney disease, neuropathy, sexual and/or urinary problems, foot problems, and eye problems. This health condition can be prevented by following a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Warning Signs

Diabetes Warning Signs

Because type 2 diabetes can lead to some serious health complications, it's important to be aware of any diabetes warning signs and get tested for diabetes, if you have these symptoms. Treating diabetes early, when treatment is most effective, can help prevent these diabetes complications. We'll explain the various diabetes warning signs and also warning signs of specific diabetes problems. Discover why it's important to listen to your body and alert your doctor if you notice any new signs or problems. Sometimes type 2 diabetes can develop without any warnings signs. In fact, about a third of all people who have type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. That's why it's important to talk to your doctor about your risk for diabetes and determined if you should be tested. Common warnings signs of diabetes include: Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Early Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Women

Early Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Women

Diabetes often strikes women differently due to a number of reasons, primary among them being the hormonal variations between men and women. Inflammation also acts differently in women. Considering that type 2 diabetes is a disease of chronic low-grade inflammation, it follows that warning signs, as well as disease progression in women, are different significantly, if not vastly. Diabetes is one of the biggest lifestyle diseases we see today. In just 25 years, the global incidence of diabetes has doubled, according to the World Health Organization. More than 15 million women are living with type 2 diabetes in the United States alone and another 40 million are prediabetic, according to CDC (Center for Disease Control) statistics of 2017. Symptoms of Diabetes in Women While many signs and symptoms of diabetes are common in men and women, women experience certain unique symptoms. These are: Vaginal and Oral Infections Overgrowth of a yeast called Candida albicans causes vaginal and oral yeast infections, called “thrush.” High levels of glucose in the blood are favorable for the growth of this yeast. Vaginal infections are accompanied by symptoms like soreness, itching, vaginal discharge and pain during sex. When the infection is oral, a cottage cheese-like coating is seen on the tongue and the inside of the mouth. Urinary Tract Infections The risk of UTIs is higher in women with diabetes. UTIs occur when bacteria gain access to the urinary tract, where they colonize and cause infection. Signs and symptoms include painful urination, burning sensation while urination, fever and cloudy (sometimes bloody) urine. High blood glucose levels, poor circulation and the inability of immune cells to effectively fight bacteria are all causes of UTIs. Poor Sexual Health High levels Continue reading >>

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes symptoms Diabetes affects 24 million people in the U.S., but only 18 million know they have it. About 90% of those people have type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, rising blood sugar acts like a poison. Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. "Almost every day people come into my office with diabetes who don't know it," says Maria Collazo-Clavell, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The best way to pick up on it is to have a blood sugar test. But if you have these symptoms, see your doctor. Watch the video: 5 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Increased urination, excessive thirst If you need to urinate frequently—particularly if you often have to get up at night to use the bathroom—it could be a symptom of diabetes. The kidneys kick into high gear to get rid of all that extra glucose in the blood, hence the urge to relieve yourself, sometimes several times during the night. The excessive thirst means your body is trying to replenish those lost fluids. These two symptoms go hand in hand and are some of "your body's ways of trying to manage high blood sugar," explains Dr. Collazo-Clavell. Weight loss Overly high blood sugar levels can also cause rapid weight loss, say 10 to 20 pounds over two or three months—but this is not a healthy weight loss. Because the insulin hormone isn't getting glucose into the cells, where it can be used as energy, the body thinks it's starving and starts breaking down protein from the muscles as an alternate source of fuel. The kidneys are also working overtime to eliminate the excess sugar, and this leads to a loss of calories (and can harm the kidneys). "These are processes that require a lot of energy," Dr. Collazo-Clavell notes. "You create a calorie deficit." Hunger Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And What To Do

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And What To Do

Diabetes symptoms can quickly turn into emergencies. The disease of diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2010, claiming nearly 70,000 lives. Responding promptly to symptoms of a diabetic emergency can be lifesaving. Causes and types Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes inhibit the body's ability to manage blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes does so by destroying the cells that produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes reduces how responsive the body is to insulin, while not enough insulin is produced to counter the sugar in the body. Hence, most diabetic emergencies are related to disruptions in a person's blood sugar levels. Occasionally, even too much of a drug being used to treat diabetes can trigger a diabetic emergency. The most common diabetic emergencies include the following: Severe hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is when blood sugar levels are abnormally low. When blood sugar dips very low, it becomes a medical emergency. Hypoglycemia normally only occurs in people with diabetes who take medication that lowers blood sugar. Blood sugar levels may drop dangerously low when a person is: consuming too much alcohol exercising, especially without adjusting food intake or insulin dosage missing or delaying meals overdosing on diabetic medication Diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body does not have enough insulin to break down glucose properly, and hormones that normally work opposite insulin are high. Over time, the body releases hormones that break down fat to provide fuel. This produces acids called ketones. As ketones build up in the body, ketoacidosis can occur. Common causes of ketoacidosis include: uncontrolled or untreated diabetes an illness or infection that changes hormone production an illness or infection that chang Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms The symptoms of diabetes include feeling very thirsty, passing more urine than usual, and feeling tired all the time. The symptoms occur because some or all of the glucose stays in your blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to get rid of the excess glucose in your urine. The main symptoms, which are common to both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, are: urinating more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired unexplained weight loss cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision – caused by the lens of the eye becoming dry The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes are usually obvious and develop very quickly, often over a few weeks. These signs and symptoms aren't always as obvious, however, and it's often diagnosed during a routine check-up. This is because they are often mild and develop gradually over a number of years. This means you may have type 2 diabetes for many years without realising it. See your GP as soon as possible if you think you may have diabetes. Early diagnosis and treatment for type 2 diabetes is very important as it may reduce your risk of developing complications later on. Hyperglycaemia Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach, can't produce enough insulin to control your blood glucose level, or when the cells in your body don't respond properly to the insulin that is produced. This means your blood glucose levels may become very high, and is known as hyperglycaemia. Hyperglycaemia can occur for several reasons, including: eating too much being unwell ineffective diabetes medication, or not taking enough Hyperglycaemia causes the main symptoms of diabetes, which include extreme thirst and frequent urination. Next review due: 27/06/2018 Type 2 diabetes occurs when t Continue reading >>

The 17 Warning Signs Of Type-2 Diabetes

The 17 Warning Signs Of Type-2 Diabetes

Many people suffer from type-2 diabetes and don’t even know it. This is because some of the symptoms might not seem like much, but it is vital to know what could be a warning sign… Type-2 diabetes is a bigger danger than we often realize. This is because it is not only the ailment itself that is a problem, but it can also lead to various other serious health issues. If you are not careful, type-2 diabetes can lead to things like insulin resistance, heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke. Here are 17 warning signs that might tell you that you are already suffering from type-2 diabetes or are well on your way to it… Constantly feeling thirsty. Always feeling hungry, even after you have just eaten. Your mouth feeling dry the whole time. Frequently urinating. Unexplained weight loss, even while eating more. Feeling tired and fatigued. Blurry vision. Persistent headaches Occasional loss of consciousness. Sores or cuts that don’t seem to heal. Itchy skin, especially around the groin or vaginal area. Regular yeast infections. Fluctuations in your bodyweight. Acanthosis nigricans (Velvety dark skin patches in the neck, armpit, and groin) Numbness, tingling, or pain in the hands and feet Problems with your sight. Erectile dysfunction. If you notice any of these signs, it is important to consult a doctor to get tested for diabetes. The earlier you can detect it and start treating it, the easier it will be to manage. But of course, prevention is always better than cure. It is also advised that you get tested for type-2 diabetes even if you don’t have any of the symptoms, as many people only realize they have it once they have had it for a while, which can increase the risk of other dangerous health issues. How you can stop and even prevent type-2 diabetes Diabetes comp Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

Diabetes Symptoms In Men: 4 Different Signs

What is diabetes? What are the types of diabetes? Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that occurs when your blood sugar (glucose), is too high (hyperglycemia). Glucose is what the body uses for energy, and the pancreas produces a hormone called insulin that helps convert the glucose from the food you eat into energy. When the body either does not produce enough insulin, does not produce any at all, or your body becomes resistant to the insulin, the glucose does not reach your cells to be used for energy. This results in the health condition termed diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, because it usually is diagnosed during childhood. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the body does not produce insulin because the body’s immune system attacks insulin-producing cells from the pancreas called beta cells. Type 1 diabetes is treated by using insulin. Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This occurs when blood sugar levels get too high over time, and the cells become insensitive or resistant to insulin (termed insulin resistance). There are multiple medications used to treat type 2 diabetes. What warning signs and symptoms of diabetes are unique to men? Signs and symptoms of diabetes unique to men include: What warning signs and symptoms of diabetes are the same in men and women? There are diabetes warning signs and symptoms that both women and men have in common, for example: Excessive thirst and hunger Irritability Slow-healing wounds Skin infections Breath odor that is fruity, sweet, or an acetone odor Diabetes Diet: Healthy Meal Plans for Diabetes-Friendly Eating How does diabetes affect men differently than wom Continue reading >>

5 Strange Symptoms That Could Be Early Signs Of Diabetes

5 Strange Symptoms That Could Be Early Signs Of Diabetes

Besides the well-known symptoms—like constant thirst and a frequent need to pee—here are a few other subtle signals that something may be wrong. Many people who develop type 2 diabetes have no idea they’re sick until a blood test shows abnormal blood sugar levels, or until their disease progresses and serious complications start to occur. “For the most part, diabetes is silent and insidious,” says Ronald Tamler, MD, director of the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute. “Most of the time people have no symptoms early on.” In some cases, though, there are sneaky signs. Some early diabetes symptoms are well-known: constant thirst, excessive urination, or sudden weight gain or loss, for example. Others, like the ones below, are more easily missed—by medical professionals and patients alike. If you’re experiencing any of these, be sure to bring them up with your doctor. Inflamed or infected gums Periodontitis—also known as gum disease—may be an early sign of type 2 diabetes, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care. The study found that people with gum disease, especially those with severe cases, had higher rates of diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed) and pre-diabetes than those without. The connection between gum disease and diabetes isn’t new, says Dr. Tamler, and it appears to go both ways: Having either condition seems to increase the risk of developing the other. “Inflammation caused by gum disease eggs on the same factors that are responsible for high blood sugar that cause diabetes,” he says. Skin discoloration “Long before you actually get diabetes, you may notice a dark discoloration on the back of your neck,” says Dr. Tamler. This is called acanthosis nigricans, and it’s usually Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

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