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What Are The Symptoms Of Uncontrolled Diabetes?

Avoiding Complications Of Diabetes

Avoiding Complications Of Diabetes

It can take work to get your diabetes under control, but the results are worth it. If you don't make the effort to get a handle on it, you could set yourself up for a host of complications. Diabetes can take a toll on nearly every organ in your body, including the: Heart and blood vessels Eyes Kidneys Nerves Gastrointestinal tract Gums and teeth Heart and Blood Vessels Heart disease and blood vessel disease are common problems for many people who don’t have their diabetes under control. You're at least twice as likely to have heart problems and strokes as people who don’t have the condition. Blood vessel damage or nerve damage may also cause foot problems that, in rare cases, can lead to amputations. People with diabetes are ten times likelier to have their toes and feet removed than those without the disease. Symptoms: You might not notice warning signs until you have a heart attack or stroke. Problems with large blood vessels in your legs can cause leg cramps, changes in skin color, and less sensation. The good news: Many studies show that controlling your diabetes can help you avoid these problems, or stop them from getting worse if you have them. Diabetes is the leading cause of new vision loss among adults ages 20 to 74 in the U.S. It can lead to eye problems, some of which can cause blindness if not treated: Glaucoma Cataracts Diabetic retinopathy, which involves the small blood vessels in your eyes Symptoms: Vision problems or sudden vision loss. The good news: Studies show that regular eye exams and timely treatment of these kinds of problems could prevent up to 90% of diabetes-related blindness. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not pe Continue reading >>

8 Warning Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

8 Warning Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Controlling your blood glucose levels isn’t always easy. However, it’s also the key to staying healthy and avoiding long-term complications from diabetes. So, it’s important that you have a solid understanding of your condition. Equally important is that you have established, with the help of your physicians, a management plan that suits you and your lifestyle. Having a diabetes management plan that truly works for you is the best way you can prevent dangerous spikes and crashes, which wreak havoc on your blood vessels over time, causing the unpleasant, painful, and sometimes debilitating complications you’re trying to avoid. While testing is, of course, an excellent indicator of how well your management plan is working, it’s also important that you have an idea of what uncontrolled blood glucose levels look like over time. Paying attention to the signs your body is giving you can clue you into a potential problem early on. Knowing how to spot these indicators can help you make the necessary adjustments to get things where they should be, and hopefully prevent long-term damage. Let’s take a look at the signs of uncontrolled blood glucose levels. 1. Bowel and Urinary tract problems Nerve damage caused by uncontrolled diabetes can result in a variety of uncomfortable issues. People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing gastroparesis, urinary tract and bladder infections, and suffering from incontinence, constipation, and diarrehea. 2. Fatigue Insulin resistance is a common culprit for chronic fatigue. If your cells are resisting the glucose (energy) you’re fueling it with, it won’t have the energy it needs to get through the day. Additionally, diabetes is stressful. That stress is often accompanied by high blood pressure and heart rate, both o Continue reading >>

Polyphagia - Increased Appetite

Polyphagia - Increased Appetite

Tweet Polyphagia is the medical term used to describe excessive hunger or increased appetite and is one of the 3 main signs of diabetes. An increase in hunger is usually a response to normal things such as intensive exercise or other strenuous activity, but polyphagia can also be the result of more severe issues such as depression or stress. Also known as hyperphagia, it is one of the three main symptoms of diabetes, along with: Polydipsia (increased thirst) and Polyuria (frequent, excessive urination) Causes of polyphagia Polyphagia can be caused by: Diabetes mellitus Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels) Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels) Anxiety Stress Bulimia Binge eating disorder Hyperthyroidism (raised level of thyroid hormone) Premenstrual syndrome Certain prescription drugs such as corticosteroids Some psychiatric conditions Rare medical conditions such as Kleine-Levin Syndrome and Prader-Willi Syndrome Hunger and hyperglycemia In uncontrolled diabetes where blood glucose levels remain abnormally high (hyperglycemia), glucose from the blood cannot enter the cells - due to either a lack of insulin or insulin resistance - so the body can’t convert the food you eat into energy. This lack of energy causes an increase in hunger. Simply eating will not get rid of the hungry feeling of polyphagia in people with uncontrolled diabetes, as this will just add to the already high blood glucose levels. The best way to lower blood glucose levels is to exercise as this can help to stimulate insulin production and reduce blood sugar levels. However, if the hunger persists, you may need to consult your doctor or diabetes health care team. Hunger and hypoglycemia Increased appetite can also be caused by abnormally low blood glucose (hypoglycemia). If blood glucose readings Continue reading >>

The Major Long-term Complications Of Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus

The Major Long-term Complications Of Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus (sometimes called “sugar diabetes”) is a medical condition that occurs when the body cannot use glucose (a type of sugar) appropriately. Glucose is the main source of energy for the body’s cells. The levels of glucose in the blood are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made by an organ called the pancreas. Insulin is secreted in the blood and acts as a vehicle to allow for glucose to enter from the blood stream into the cells. The latter in turn, convert glucose into energy to complete their essential functions. Statistics indicate that some 25.8 million children and adults in the United States—comprising about 8.3% of the U.S. population— have been diagnosed with Diabetes. Diabetes occurs either when the pancreas does not make enough insulin (Type I Diabetes) or, when the body can’t respond normally to the insulin that is available (Type II Diabetes). This causes glucose levels in the blood to rise, leading to symptoms such as increased urination, extreme thirst, persistent sensation of hunger and unexplained weight loss. All forms of diabetes increase the risk of long-term health complications as the unutilized glucose molecules circulate in the blood stream and eventually start to interfere with the normal physiology and function of different tissues. The major long-term complications of Diabetes are by and large related to damage caused in the circulatory system. In fact, Diabetes irreversibly damages the large blood vessels, doubling the risk of cardiovascular disease in the form of ischemic heart disease (angina and myocardial infarctions), cerebrovascular disease (stroke and transient ischemic attacks) and peripheral vascular disease (atherosclerosis of the blood vessels of the extremities). In addition, Diabetes damage Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes (also called diabetes mellitus type 2) is the most common form of diabetes. Insulin is not required for survival in type 2 diabetes. That is why they used to call it non-insulin dependent diabetes. Insulin resistance is the main problem in type 2 diabetes. It means that your body can’t use insulin effectively. You still make insulin but it is less effective. So, you need more insulin to do the same job. Without effective use of insulin, you blood sugar levels go up. That is what happens in type 2 diabetes. (They don’t call it non-insulin dependent diabetes anymore to avoid the perception that insulin has nothing to with type 2 diabetes.) Many type 2 diabetes patients need insulin to effectively treat high blood sugars because their bodies do not make enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance. Type 2 Diabetes symptoms Type 2 diabetes symptoms develop very slowly. You may already have diabetes, but may not even have the first signs of diabetes for many years. Here is the list of 10 classic diabetes symptoms: Frequent urination Excessive hunger Excessive thirst (dry mouth) Unusual weight loss Extreme fatigue and irritability Frequent infections Blurred vision Cuts/bruises are slow to heal Tingling numbness in the hands or feet Recurring skin, gum or bladder infection If someone asks you, “What are the symptoms of diabetes?”, this list makes it easy to answer the question. However, the list of 10 diabetes symptoms does not help people figure out if they have diabetes. Many patients with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms for many years. When they finally have classic diabetes symptoms, they already have complications of diabetes. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes symptoms Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes leads to many complicati Continue reading >>

Consider This Case: An Uncontrolled Diabetic Cat

Consider This Case: An Uncontrolled Diabetic Cat

Ann Della Maggiore, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM University of California—Davis Sugar, a 12-year-old spayed female Maine Coon cat, presented for poorly controlled diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. HISTORY Sugar was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus 2 years prior to presentation. Initially, her diabetes was moderately controlled on 5 to 6 units of recombinant human protamine zinc insulin (PZI) (40 U/mL; ProZinc, bi-vetmedica.com), but over the year prior to presentation the insulin dose had been progressively increased with no improvement in glycemic control. Upon presentation, Sugar was receiving 14 units of recombinant human PZI. The owner was performing blood glucose curves at home, but struggling to maintain Sugar’s blood glucose below 300 mg/dL. In addition to diabetes mellitus, Sugar had concurrent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and chronic rhinitis, and persistent polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and weakness. Key Points: Feline Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes is a disease of insulin deficiency. Diabetes in cats is most commonly classified as type 2-like diabetes—a disease process in which insufficient insulin production from beta cells takes place in the setting of insulin resistance. Insulin requirements can be altered by obesity, inflammation, or concurrent endocrine disease, such as hypersomatotropism (acromegaly) or hyperadrenocorticism. Some refer to a subclass of diabetic cats with secondary diabetes—patients in which diabetes occurs subsequent to (1) another endocrine disease (eg, acromegaly, hyperadrenocorticism) or (2) administration of diabetogenic drugs (eg, glucocorticoids).1 PHYSICAL EXAMINATION Physical examination revealed a symmetrically muscled cat, weighing 7.7 kg, with a body condition score of 6/9. Sugar had an unkempt hair coat, mild prognathia infer Continue reading >>

What Happens If Diabetes Goes Untreated?

What Happens If Diabetes Goes Untreated?

Diabetes is on the rise. The number of people affected in the U.S. has tripled since 1980, with nearly 26 million Americans affected in 2011, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can be managed with a combination of lifestyle changes, diet and medications. Insulin injections are necessary to treat type 1 diabetes and advanced cases of type 2 diabetes. Untreated diabetes can result in life-threatening metabolic crises. Even if emergency situations are avoided, poorly controlled diabetes damages blood vessels and nerves throughout the body, with devastating consequences over time. Video of the Day Untreated diabetes can be fatal. One dangerous short-term complication is diabetic ketoacidosis, a rapidly progressing condition. Low insulin levels cause sugar to build up in the blood. The body breaks down fat for fuel, resulting in a buildup of byproducts called ketones and lowering the blood pH. Classic signs and symptoms of DKA are breathing that sounds like sighs, confusion, nausea, vomiting, lightheadedness, dehydration and a fruity smell on the breath. Trauma, stress and infections raise the risk for DKA. Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state is another dangerous complication of untreated diabetes. Prominent signs and symptoms include weakness, leg cramps, visual problems, low-grade fever, abdominal bloating and dehydration. HHS is most common in older adults with type 2 diabetes. The condition develops with profoundly high blood sugar levels. Both DKA and HHS are life-threatening medical emergencies. Untreated or poorly controlled diabetes can damage your eyes. Blood vessel leakage and an overgrowth of new vessels can damage the vision-perceiving portion of the eye. These changes -- known as diabetic retinopathy -- Continue reading >>

Coding Tip: Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10

Coding Tip: Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10

Kim Carrier RHIT, CDIP, CCS, CCS-P Director of Coding Quality Assurance AHIMA Approved ICD-10-CM/PCS Trainer How do coders report uncontrolled DM in ICD-10-CM? First, coders will need to have further documentation of hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia as there is no default code for uncontrolled diabetes. Uncontrolled diabetes is classified by type and whether it is hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. The term “uncontrolled” is not synonymous with hyperglycemia. The term “poorly controlled” is synonymous with hyperglycemia when referring to diabetes in ICD-10-CM. In ICD-9-CM, uncontrolled diabetes had a specific 5th digit to show that the diabetes was controlled or uncontrolled. This is no longer the case in ICD-10-CM. If the patient has documented uncontrolled diabetes, without further clarification of hyperglycemia and/or hypoglycemia, a query is necessary to clarify which type the patient has. If the patient does have documented hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia in addition to the diagnosis of uncontrolled diabetes, ICD-10-CM codes would be used to show that the diabetes is with hyperglycemia and/or hypoglycemia. Is uncontrolled and poorly controlled DM the same? No, uncontrolled and poorly controlled are not interchangeable when describing diabetes in ICD-10-CM. Uncontrolled can mean either hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia and is indexed as such in ICD-10-CM. Poorly controlled means hyperglycemia per the ICD-10-CM index. From the ICD-10-CM Index: Diabetes, diabetic (mellitus) (sugar) Poorly controlled-code to Diabetes, by type with hyperglycemia Diabetes, diabetic (mellitus) (sugar) Meaning Hyperglycemia-see Diabetes, by type, with hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia-see Diabetes, by type, with hypoglycemia Please see question and answer in AHA Coding Clinic, First Quarter 2017 Page: Continue reading >>

Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus In Adults: Experience In Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Coma With Low-dose Insulin And A Uniform Treatment Regimen

Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus In Adults: Experience In Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Coma With Low-dose Insulin And A Uniform Treatment Regimen

A number of changes in therapy of uncontrolled diabetes have occurred in recent years. These include low-dose insulin regimens, often routine phosphate repletion, more cautious bicarbonate replacement, infusion of larger fluid volumes, the use of hypotonic solutions in hyperosmolar states, and recently magnesium repletion. These modalities (with the exception of routine magnesium repletion) have been employed at North Central Bronx Hospital since its opening in 1976. Through this retrospective analysis of 275 cases of uncontrolled diabetes we have tried to answer the following questions: What is the outcome of all episodes of uncontrolled diabetes in a municipal hospital population with a uniform treatment protocol? What are the results of treatment with new modalities in various age groups? Are the causes of death different from those tabulated in previous reports? Our results indicate a good outcome in those under the age of 50 yr regardless of the diagnosis of hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (HNC) or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Mortality from DKA was 2% in those under age 50 yr and 26% in the older age group. Surprising was the low mortality in the hyperosmolar group with 0% mortality under age 50 yr and 14% in patients over this age. The major categories of causes of death in the series included sepsis, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), metabolic, cardiovascular, and shock. With the exception of ARDS, these categories were not different from other reported series. There were few thromboembolic events in this series. We conclude that the newer therapeutic approaches are effective in the treatment of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, both ketoacidotic and hyperosmolar, and that they can be used safely and effectively in managing these metabolic derangements in d Continue reading >>

The Treatment Of Severely Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus.

The Treatment Of Severely Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract Patients with severely uncontrolled diabetes mellitus must be cared for by physicians and nurses who understand the pathophysiology of ketoacidosis and nonketotic hyperglycemia, who carefully seek and treat precipitating or underlying illnesses, and who can provide the patients with continuous clinical attention and laboratory monitoring. Most patients with diabetic ketoacidosis survive the acute metabolic disorder; the infrequent deaths are usually due to serious underlying illnesses. The latter are more common in patients with nonketotic hyperglycemia, who are usually older than those with ketoacidosis and who usually also have serious underlying chronic diseases. The essential features of treatment for either of the foregoing acute metabolic disorders are administration of insulin (especially gingerly in the older patients with nonketotic hyperglycemia, despite their commonly remarkable hyperglycemia); rehydration with NaCl solutions; and IV administration of K+, usually not until after a few hours of treatment with insulin and NaCl solutions. Administration of NaHCO3 is usually not necessary except in patients with a blood pH less than 7.1. Administration of phosphate has been recommended as part of the treatment for ketoacidosis, but its need is uncertain. Although patients with nonketotic hyperglycemia are often more severely dehydrated and hyperglycemic than those with ketoacidosis, they usually should be given smaller amounts of insulin, NaCl solutions, and K+, and less rapidly. Continue reading >>

Question: Identify Symptoms Of Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus. Are There Any Long Term Complications Of Poo...

Question: Identify Symptoms Of Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus. Are There Any Long Term Complications Of Poo...

Identify symptoms of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. Are there any long term complications of poorly controlled diabetes? Can these complications be avoided? If so, how? Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Complications

Diabetes: Complications

People with diabetes are at risk for long-term problems affecting the eyes, kidneys, heart, brain, feet, and nerves. The best way to prevent or delay these problems is to control your blood sugar and take good care of yourself. Eyes It is recommended that people with diabetes see an eye doctor every year for a dilated eye exam. Eye problems that can occur with diabetes include: Cataracts: a clouding of the lens of the eyes. Glaucoma: increased pressure in the eye. Retinopathy: eye changes with the retina in the back of the eye. Symptoms of eye problems include Blurred vision. Spots or lines in your vision. Watery eyes. Eye discomfort. Loss of vision. If you have any changes in your vision, call your healthcare provider. Have your urine checked for protein at least once a year. Protein in the urine is a sign of kidney disease. High blood pressure might also lead to kidney disease. Your blood pressure should be checked when you see your healthcare provider. Symptoms of a kidney problem include: Swelling of the hands, feet, and face. Weight gain from edema. Itching and/or drowsiness. (This can occur with end stage kidney disease.) Prompt treatment may slow the changes with kidney disease. All people with diabetes have an increased chance for heart disease and strokes. Heart disease is the major cause of death in people with diabetes. It is important to control other risks such as high blood pressure and high fats (cholesterol), as well as blood sugar. Symptoms of a heart attack include: Feeling faint. Feeling dizzy. Sweating. Chest pain or pressure. Pain in the shoulders, jaw, and left arm. Warning signs of a stroke include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, usually on one side of the body. Sudden nausea. Vomiting. Difficulty speaking or understanding w Continue reading >>

Definition Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Definition Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Diabetes is a condition where the body either doesn’t produce enough insulin or the cells have become resistant to insulin. Either way, the body isn’t able to make use of glucose in the bloodstream, so cells begin to die and tissue damage occurs. Definition Uncontrolled diabetes is defined as having a consistent blood sugar level of over 100 mg/dL. To avoid high glucose levels, you will need to properly take the medication you are prescribed, maintain a strict diet, exercise, and monitor your blood sugar regularly. Statistics Currently, uncontrolled diabetes is the sixth largest cause of death in the United States, with 18.2 million people currently being treated and another 5.2 million people who are currently undiagnosed. Symptoms Symptoms of uncontrolled diabetes include frequent urination, unusual thirst, weight loss, hunger, changes in vision, lethargy, sores that do not heal, and tingling in the hands and feet. Complications Health issues that occur due to uncontrolled diabetes include heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cataracts, kidney disease, and nerve damage leading to amputation. Control Measures While there is no cure for diabetes, it can be managed. Losing weight, becoming more active, and taking your medications properly will ensure that your diabetes remains under control and that you will have the best chance at a long and healthy life. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment & Management

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations The goals in caring for patients with diabetes mellitus are to eliminate symptoms and to prevent, or at least slow, the development of complications. Microvascular (ie, eye and kidney disease) risk reduction is accomplished through control of glycemia and blood pressure; macrovascular (ie, coronary, cerebrovascular, peripheral vascular) risk reduction, through control of lipids and hypertension, smoking cessation, and aspirin therapy; and metabolic and neurologic risk reduction, through control of glycemia. New abridged recommendations for primary care providers The American Diabetes Association has released condensed recommendations for Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes: Abridged for Primary Care Providers, highlighting recommendations most relevant to primary care. The abridged version focusses particularly on the following aspects: The recommendations can be accessed at American Diabetes Association DiabetesPro Professional Resources Online, Clinical Practice Recommendations – 2015. [117] Type 2 diabetes care is best provided by a multidisciplinary team of health professionals with expertise in diabetes, working in collaboration with the patient and family. [2] Management includes the following: Ideally, blood glucose should be maintained at near-normal levels (preprandial levels of 90-130 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1C [HbA1c] levels < 7%). However, focus on glucose alone does not provide adequate treatment for patients with diabetes mellitus. Treatment involves multiple goals (ie, glycemia, lipids, blood pressure). Aggressive glucose lowering may not be the best strategy in all patients. Individual risk stratification is highly recommended. In patients with advanced type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for cardiovascular disease, lowering Hb Continue reading >>

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