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What Are The Symptoms Of Uncontrolled Diabetes?

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

Definition Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Definition Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Diabetes is a condition where the body either doesn’t produce enough insulin or the cells have become resistant to insulin. Either way, the body isn’t able to make use of glucose in the bloodstream, so cells begin to die and tissue damage occurs. Definition Uncontrolled diabetes is defined as having a consistent blood sugar level of over 100 mg/dL. To avoid high glucose levels, you will need to properly take the medication you are prescribed, maintain a strict diet, exercise, and monitor your blood sugar regularly. Statistics Currently, uncontrolled diabetes is the sixth largest cause of death in the United States, with 18.2 million people currently being treated and another 5.2 million people who are currently undiagnosed. Symptoms Symptoms of uncontrolled diabetes include frequent urination, unusual thirst, weight loss, hunger, changes in vision, lethargy, sores that do not heal, and tingling in the hands and feet. Complications Health issues that occur due to uncontrolled diabetes include heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cataracts, kidney disease, and nerve damage leading to amputation. Control Measures While there is no cure for diabetes, it can be managed. Losing weight, becoming more active, and taking your medications properly will ensure that your diabetes remains under control and that you will have the best chance at a long and healthy life. Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

What is the tool used to help remember the symptoms of diabetes? CAUTION DIABETES C - constant urination A - abnormal thirst U - unusual hunger T - the rapid loss of weight I - irritability O - obvious weakness and fatigue N - nausea and vomiting D - drowsiness I - itching A - a family history B - blurred vision E - excessive weight gain T - tingling and numbness in extremities E - easily fatigued S - skin infections What is neuropathy and what are some of it's symptoms? Nerve damage from diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy (new-ROP-uh-thee). About half of all people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage. Symptoms: • I feel "pins and needles" in my feet. • Pain or increased sensitivity (in feet) • I have "burning, stabbing or shooting pains" in my feet. • Sometimes I feel like I have socks or gloves on when I don't. • My feet hurt at night, like when the sheets touch. My feet are numb and feel dead. • My feet and hands get very cold or very hot. I have trouble feeling heat or cold in my feet or hands • Numbness or Weakness • I don't feel pain in my feet, even when I have blisters or injuries. • I can't feel my feet when I'm walking. • The muscles in my feet and legs are weak. I'm unsteady when I stand or walk. What is hypoglycemia? What are the signs and symptoms? Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by abnormally low blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Signs and Symptoms of Hypoglycemia: (happen quickly) • Shakiness, nervousness or anxiety • Sweating, chills and clamminess • Anger, irritability/impatience , stubborness or sadness • Confusion, including delirium • Rapid/fast heartbeat • Lightheadedness or dizziness, lack of coordination, sleepiness • Hunger and nausea, tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue • Blurre Continue reading >>

The Treatment Of Severely Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus.

The Treatment Of Severely Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract Patients with severely uncontrolled diabetes mellitus must be cared for by physicians and nurses who understand the pathophysiology of ketoacidosis and nonketotic hyperglycemia, who carefully seek and treat precipitating or underlying illnesses, and who can provide the patients with continuous clinical attention and laboratory monitoring. Most patients with diabetic ketoacidosis survive the acute metabolic disorder; the infrequent deaths are usually due to serious underlying illnesses. The latter are more common in patients with nonketotic hyperglycemia, who are usually older than those with ketoacidosis and who usually also have serious underlying chronic diseases. The essential features of treatment for either of the foregoing acute metabolic disorders are administration of insulin (especially gingerly in the older patients with nonketotic hyperglycemia, despite their commonly remarkable hyperglycemia); rehydration with NaCl solutions; and IV administration of K+, usually not until after a few hours of treatment with insulin and NaCl solutions. Administration of NaHCO3 is usually not necessary except in patients with a blood pH less than 7.1. Administration of phosphate has been recommended as part of the treatment for ketoacidosis, but its need is uncertain. Although patients with nonketotic hyperglycemia are often more severely dehydrated and hyperglycemic than those with ketoacidosis, they usually should be given smaller amounts of insulin, NaCl solutions, and K+, and less rapidly. Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

When you hear the word “diabetes,” your first thought is likely about high blood sugar. Blood sugar is an often-underestimated component of your health. When it’s out of whack over a long period of time, it could develop into diabetes. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, a hormone that allows your body to turn glucose (sugar) into energy. Here’s what symptoms may occur to your body when diabetes takes effect. Diabetes can be effectively managed when caught early. However, when left untreated, it can lead to potential complications that include heart disease, stroke, kidney damage, and nerve damage. Normally after you eat or drink, your body will break down sugars from your food and use them for energy in your cells. To accomplish this, your pancreas needs to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin is what facilitates the process of pulling sugar from the blood and putting it in the cells for use, or energy. If you have diabetes, your pancreas either produces too little insulin or none at all. The insulin can’t be used effectively. This allows blood glucose levels to rise while the rest of your cells are deprived of much-needed energy. This can lead to a wide variety of problems affecting nearly every major body system. The effects of diabetes on your body also depends on the type you have. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1, also called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is an immune system disorder. Your own immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, destroying your body’s ability to make insulin. With type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin to live. Most people are diagnosed as a child or young adult. Type 2 is related to insulin resistance. It used to occur i Continue reading >>

Ten Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Ten Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

The following 10 symptoms are signs of uncontrolled diabetes. As diabetes raises blood sugar levels, many people with diabetes think it is normal to have high blood glucose. With uncontrolled sugars, people also drink more frequently, causing them to produce more urine. High blood glucose can make people with diabetes very dehydrated, so that they feel thirsty. Their blood glucose also tends to rise more often. People with diabetes who experience symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis should not wait to talk to a doctor. The body triggers hunger signs as it tries to gain access to fuel. Even though obesity is linked to type 2 diabetes, people with uncontrolled diabetes may not gain weight, even when they overeat. People with both diabetes and kidney disease may experience the following symptoms: • very dark or bloody urine • frothy urine • pain near the kidneys in the lower back • chronic kidney or urinary tract infections More often, however, kidney disease produces few or no symptoms in its early form. Author: Web Desk Source: pakistankakhudahafiz.com Continue reading >>

Polyphagia - Increased Appetite

Polyphagia - Increased Appetite

Tweet Polyphagia is the medical term used to describe excessive hunger or increased appetite and is one of the 3 main signs of diabetes. An increase in hunger is usually a response to normal things such as intensive exercise or other strenuous activity, but polyphagia can also be the result of more severe issues such as depression or stress. Also known as hyperphagia, it is one of the three main symptoms of diabetes, along with: Polydipsia (increased thirst) and Polyuria (frequent, excessive urination) Causes of polyphagia Polyphagia can be caused by: Diabetes mellitus Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels) Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels) Anxiety Stress Bulimia Binge eating disorder Hyperthyroidism (raised level of thyroid hormone) Premenstrual syndrome Certain prescription drugs such as corticosteroids Some psychiatric conditions Rare medical conditions such as Kleine-Levin Syndrome and Prader-Willi Syndrome Hunger and hyperglycemia In uncontrolled diabetes where blood glucose levels remain abnormally high (hyperglycemia), glucose from the blood cannot enter the cells - due to either a lack of insulin or insulin resistance - so the body can’t convert the food you eat into energy. This lack of energy causes an increase in hunger. Simply eating will not get rid of the hungry feeling of polyphagia in people with uncontrolled diabetes, as this will just add to the already high blood glucose levels. The best way to lower blood glucose levels is to exercise as this can help to stimulate insulin production and reduce blood sugar levels. However, if the hunger persists, you may need to consult your doctor or diabetes health care team. Hunger and hypoglycemia Increased appetite can also be caused by abnormally low blood glucose (hypoglycemia). If blood glucose readings Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes (also called diabetes mellitus type 2) is the most common form of diabetes. Insulin is not required for survival in type 2 diabetes. That is why they used to call it non-insulin dependent diabetes. Insulin resistance is the main problem in type 2 diabetes. It means that your body can’t use insulin effectively. You still make insulin but it is less effective. So, you need more insulin to do the same job. Without effective use of insulin, you blood sugar levels go up. That is what happens in type 2 diabetes. (They don’t call it non-insulin dependent diabetes anymore to avoid the perception that insulin has nothing to with type 2 diabetes.) Many type 2 diabetes patients need insulin to effectively treat high blood sugars because their bodies do not make enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance. Type 2 Diabetes symptoms Type 2 diabetes symptoms develop very slowly. You may already have diabetes, but may not even have the first signs of diabetes for many years. Here is the list of 10 classic diabetes symptoms: Frequent urination Excessive hunger Excessive thirst (dry mouth) Unusual weight loss Extreme fatigue and irritability Frequent infections Blurred vision Cuts/bruises are slow to heal Tingling numbness in the hands or feet Recurring skin, gum or bladder infection If someone asks you, “What are the symptoms of diabetes?”, this list makes it easy to answer the question. However, the list of 10 diabetes symptoms does not help people figure out if they have diabetes. Many patients with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms for many years. When they finally have classic diabetes symptoms, they already have complications of diabetes. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes symptoms Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes leads to many complicati Continue reading >>

A Third Treatment Option In Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

A Third Treatment Option In Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

Addition of dapagliflozin may benefit patients whose blood glucose is uncontrolled with both metformin and sulfonylurea… Dapagliflozin is a selective and reversible sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, which lowers plasma glucose level by increasing urinary excretion of glucose. Addition of dapagliflozin may benefit patients whose blood glucose is uncontrolled with both metformin and sulfonylurea; however, the effectiveness and safety of this combination is unknown. This study was a 24-week, international, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, phase IIIb study, designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of dapagliflozin compared to placebo in uncontrolled type 2 diabetic patients with metformin and sulfonylurea combination therapy. The study population included 219 patients more than 18 years of age and inadequate glycemic control (HbA1C ≥ 7.0% and ≤ 10.5%). They were randomly assigned to either dapagliflozin 10 mg group or a placebo group, along with metformin and a sulfonylurea. HbA1C levels were measured at baseline and after 24 weeks of treatment. The primary end point was change of HbA1C levels from baseline to week 24. Key secondary end points included change from baseline to week 24 in FPG, total body weight, proportion of patients having HbA1C < 7%, and change from baseline to week 8 in SBP. Statistical tests included ANCOVA and last observation carried forward (LOCF) approach. At the end of the study, patients treated with dapagliflozin demonstrated significant improvements in glycemic control compared to patients with placebo. HbA1c levels were significantly lower in dapagliflozin group compared to placebo group, with a decrease of 0.86% and 0.17% from baseline levels, respectively (p-value < 0.0001). Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment & Management

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations The goals in caring for patients with diabetes mellitus are to eliminate symptoms and to prevent, or at least slow, the development of complications. Microvascular (ie, eye and kidney disease) risk reduction is accomplished through control of glycemia and blood pressure; macrovascular (ie, coronary, cerebrovascular, peripheral vascular) risk reduction, through control of lipids and hypertension, smoking cessation, and aspirin therapy; and metabolic and neurologic risk reduction, through control of glycemia. New abridged recommendations for primary care providers The American Diabetes Association has released condensed recommendations for Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes: Abridged for Primary Care Providers, highlighting recommendations most relevant to primary care. The abridged version focusses particularly on the following aspects: The recommendations can be accessed at American Diabetes Association DiabetesPro Professional Resources Online, Clinical Practice Recommendations – 2015. [117] Type 2 diabetes care is best provided by a multidisciplinary team of health professionals with expertise in diabetes, working in collaboration with the patient and family. [2] Management includes the following: Ideally, blood glucose should be maintained at near-normal levels (preprandial levels of 90-130 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1C [HbA1c] levels < 7%). However, focus on glucose alone does not provide adequate treatment for patients with diabetes mellitus. Treatment involves multiple goals (ie, glycemia, lipids, blood pressure). Aggressive glucose lowering may not be the best strategy in all patients. Individual risk stratification is highly recommended. In patients with advanced type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for cardiovascular disease, lowering Hb Continue reading >>

What Happens If Diabetes Goes Untreated?

What Happens If Diabetes Goes Untreated?

Diabetes is on the rise. The number of people affected in the U.S. has tripled since 1980, with nearly 26 million Americans affected in 2011, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can be managed with a combination of lifestyle changes, diet and medications. Insulin injections are necessary to treat type 1 diabetes and advanced cases of type 2 diabetes. Untreated diabetes can result in life-threatening metabolic crises. Even if emergency situations are avoided, poorly controlled diabetes damages blood vessels and nerves throughout the body, with devastating consequences over time. Video of the Day Untreated diabetes can be fatal. One dangerous short-term complication is diabetic ketoacidosis, a rapidly progressing condition. Low insulin levels cause sugar to build up in the blood. The body breaks down fat for fuel, resulting in a buildup of byproducts called ketones and lowering the blood pH. Classic signs and symptoms of DKA are breathing that sounds like sighs, confusion, nausea, vomiting, lightheadedness, dehydration and a fruity smell on the breath. Trauma, stress and infections raise the risk for DKA. Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state is another dangerous complication of untreated diabetes. Prominent signs and symptoms include weakness, leg cramps, visual problems, low-grade fever, abdominal bloating and dehydration. HHS is most common in older adults with type 2 diabetes. The condition develops with profoundly high blood sugar levels. Both DKA and HHS are life-threatening medical emergencies. Untreated or poorly controlled diabetes can damage your eyes. Blood vessel leakage and an overgrowth of new vessels can damage the vision-perceiving portion of the eye. These changes -- known as diabetic retinopathy -- Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

With type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus), if you don’t work hard to keep your blood glucose level under control, there are short- and long-term complications to contend with. However, by watching the amount and types of food you eat (your meal plan), exercising, and taking any necessary medications, you may be able to prevent these complications. And even if you have some of the long-term, more serious complications discussed below when you’re first diagnosed, getting tight control of your blood glucose will help prevent the complications from becoming worse. (It is possible with type 2 diabetes to already have some of these complications when you’re first diagnosed. That’s because type 2 develops gradually, and you may not realize that you have high blood glucose for quite some time. Over time, high blood glucose can cause serious damage. You can learn more about that in this article on the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.) Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It is possible for your blood glucose to drop, especially if you’re taking insulin or a sulfonylurea drug (those make your body produce insulin throughout the day). With these medications, if you eat less than usual or were more active, your blood glucose may dip too much. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and too much alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). Rapid heartbeat Sweating Whiteness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech Mild cases of hypoglycemia can be treated by drinking orange juice or eating a glucose tablet—those will quickly rai Continue reading >>

Problems That People With Diabetes Shouldn’t Ignore

Problems That People With Diabetes Shouldn’t Ignore

People with diabetes learn to manage their condition with a healthy diet, regular exercise and medication. Success is measured by how well they can control their blood sugar. However, many factors can affect blood sugar besides diet and activity. Illness, stress, social drinking and women’s menstrual cycles can all influence blood sugar levels and upset your normal routine. If you have diabetes, you may know these factors and make adjustments accordingly. However, some symptoms are always reasons to seek medical advice, whether it’s a call to your GP or make a trip to accident and emergency. Here are the diabetes symptoms you should never ignore. Frequent urination, extreme thirst or hunger, or blurry vision These are three common warning signs of uncontrolled blood sugar. With any of these symptoms, you should test your blood sugar and seek medical advice. Depending on how high your blood sugar is, medication may fix the problem or you may have to seek medical care to replace fluids and electrolytes and to get blood sugar back under control. If left unchecked, high blood sugar can lead to serious, life-threatening conditions. Type 1 diabetes patients can develop diabetic ketoacidosis, which happens when the body starts breaking down fats instead of sugars and a dangerous build-up of ketones (by-products of fat metabolism) occurs. In type 2 diabetes, hyperosmolar coma can occur, which leads to dehydration and altered consciousness and which could be fatal if untreated. Acting drunk Strange behaviour can also indicate low blood sugar. This can happen when a person’s medication works too well and overshoots the target. Drinking some juice or eating a snack usually is enough to raise sugar levels and normalise behaviour. Often, however, the person is not in the state Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

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