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What Are The Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar And High Blood Sugar?

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

A low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia or an insulin reaction, is defined as a blood glucose level below 60 to 70 mg/dl. It is usually companied by one or more of the symptoms described below. Low blood sugars or insulin reactions can occur whenever insulin is used. Although less frequent, it can also occur with use of drugs that stimulate insulin production in Type 2 diabetes, such as Diabenese, Glyburide, Glipizide, and Starlix. Hypoglycemia symptoms vary greatly. Lows may occur with no symptoms, minor symptoms, or full-blown symptoms. They will vary from person to person and from one low to the next in the same person. A single symptom may make you aware that your blood sugar has become low, or you may suddenly become aware of several symptoms at once. Symptoms are created both by the effect of the low blood sugar on the brain and other organs, and by the effects of adrenaline and glucagon which are released in large quantities to raise the blood sugar. Anytime you suspect a low blood sugar, check it to be sure and, if you are low, raise your sugar quickly with glucose tablets or other fast carbohydrates. If you're too confused to check, eat quick carbs and check later. The faster you recognize hypoglycemia, the faster you can respond and bring the blood sugar back to normal. Keep in mind that you do not want to eat too much when you treat a low blood sugar, or you can begin a blood sugar rollercoaster. Identify the symptoms for insulin reactions so you can take action quickly. Insulin Reaction Symptoms shaking sweating irritability headache tingling hunger blurred vision dizziness and confusion numbness of the lips nausea or vomiting fast heart rate sudden tiredness seizures pale appearance frequent sighing personality change confusion or poor concentation loss Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar)

Introduction Hypoglycaemia, or a "hypo", is an abnormally low level of glucose in your blood (less than four millimoles per litre). When your glucose (sugar) level is too low, your body doesn't have enough energy to carry out its activities. Hypoglycaemia is most commonly associated with diabetes, and mainly occurs if someone with diabetes takes too much insulin, misses a meal or exercises too hard. In rare cases, it's possible for a person who doesn't have diabetes to experience hypoglycaemia. It can be triggered by malnutrition, binge drinking or certain conditions, such as Addison's disease. Read more about the causes of hypoglycaemia Symptoms of hypoglycaemia Most people will have some warning that their blood glucose levels are too low, which gives them time to correct them. Symptoms usually occur when blood sugar levels fall below four millimoles (mmol) per litre. Typical early warning signs are feeling hungry, trembling or shakiness, and sweating. In more severe cases, you may also feel confused and have difficulty concentrating. In very severe cases, a person experiencing hypoglycaemia can lose consciousness. It's also possible for hypoglycaemia to occur during sleep, which can cause excess sweating, disturbed sleep, and feeling tired and confused upon waking. Read more about the symptoms of hypoglycaemia Correcting hypoglycaemia The immediate treatment for hypoglycaemia is to have some food or drink that contains sugar, such as dextrose tablets or fruit juice, to correct your blood glucose levels. After having something sugary, you may need to have a longer-acting "starchy" carbohydrate food, such as a sandwich or a few biscuits. If hypoglycaemia causes a loss of consciousness, an injection of the hormone glucagon can be given to raise blood glucose levels and Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugar

Treating Low Blood Sugar

You are at risk of having a low blood sugar reaction if you: Skip or delay a meal or snack Take too much insulin or eat too few carbohydrates Exercise Drink alcohol, especially without eating carbohydrates Check your blood sugar if you have any of these symptoms: Weakness and/or fatigue Headache Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Shaking Increased heartbeat If your blood sugar is less than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl): Eat 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrate (sample foods listed below) Wait 15 minutes and then recheck your blood sugar If your blood sugar is still less than 100 mg/dl, take another 15 grams of carbohydrate and retest your blood sugar in another 15 minutes. Repeat if necessary. Important: If you have frequent low blood sugars speak to your doctor. You may need changes in your medication and/or meal plan. Quick Carbohydrate Guide for Treating Low Blood Sugars If your blood sugar is less than 70 mg/dl, you need 15 to 30 grams of a quickly absorbed carbohydrate, like the ones listed below. Each of the following servings provides 15 grams of carbohydrate. Candies and Other Sweets 5 small gum drops 12 gummy bears 6 large jelly beans 5 Life Savers 15 Skittles 1 Tablespoon honey, jam or jelly 1 Tablespoon sugar in water 4 Starburst Beverages 1/2 cup apple juice 1/2 cup orange or grapefruit juice 1/2 cup pineapple juice 1/2 cup regular soda (not diet) 1/3 cup grape juice 1/3 cup cranberry juice 1/3 cup prune juice 1 cup fat free milk Fruits 1/2 banana 1 small apple 1 small orange 1/2 cup applesauce 2 tablespoons of raisins 15 grapes Other 3 to 4 glucose tablets 1 tube glucose gel Note: The foods listed above are easily absorbed and will raise blood sugar levels quickly. Foods that contain protein or fat — such as chocolate, candy bars, ice cream, cookies, crackers and Continue reading >>

Is It Epilepsy Or A Low Blood Sugar Seizure?

Is It Epilepsy Or A Low Blood Sugar Seizure?

A seizure is a symptom of a brain problem that occurs because of sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. There are many types of seizures and most last from thirty seconds to two minutes. Seizures can have many causes, including medicines, high fevers, head injuries, and certain diseases such as diabetes and epilepsy. What causes a seizure in people with diabetes? Hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, occurs when the level of glucose in a person’s body drops below normal. Hypoglycemia can be dangerous and occurs in people with type 1 diabetes, and people with type 2 diabetes who are injecting insulin or using oral medications (sulfonylureas and meglitinides) to lower blood glucose. Sulfonylureas stimulate the beta cells of the pancreas to release more insulin. Brand names include: Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol and Glucotrol XL) Glyburide (Micronase, Glynase, and Diabeta) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Meglitinides also stimulate the beta cells to release insulin. Brand names include: Repaglinide (Prandin) Nateglinide (Starlix) When someone with type 1 or type 2 diabetes experiences a significant drop in their blood glucose, they may experience a range of symptoms that include: Dizziness Sweating Confusion Hunger Extremely low blood glucose can result in a “seizure,” which, if left untreated, can lead to a coma. If you are taking a medication that causes the pancreas to release more insulin, or if you are taking insulin injections, it’s important to know whether you are having low glucose levels during the night while sleeping, as this could be the cause of your seizures. A continuous glucose monitoring system—a pager-sized device typically worn for two to three days that measures your blood glucose every five minutes—can determine if you are Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

A blood glucose of less than 70 mg/dl in general is considered a low blood glucose. Because you may feel some of the symptoms of low blood glucose when your glucose is normal, be sure, if possible, to check your blood glucose when you think it is low. The symptoms of a low blood glucose are: Sweaty and shaky Weak Headache Confused Irritable Hungry Pale Rapid heart rate Uncoordinated If your blood glucose is low, follow the steps below to treat: Follow the 15-15 rule: Eat or drink something from the list below equal to 15 grams of carbohydrate (carb). Rest for 15 minutes, then re-check your blood glucose. If it is still low, (below 70), repeat step 1 above. If your next meal is more than an hour away, you will need to eat one carbohydrate choice as a snack to keep your blood glucose from going low again. If you can't figure out why you have low blood glucose, call your healthcare provider, as your medicine may need to be adjusted. Always carry something with you to treat an insulin reaction. Use food from the list below. Foods equal to One Carbohydrate Choice (15 grams of carb): 3 Glucose tablets or 4 Dextrose tablets 4 ounces of fruit juice 5-6 ounces (about 1/2 can) of regular soda such as Coke or Pepsi 7-8 gummy or regular Life Savers 1 Tbsp. of sugar or jelly Call your doctor Call your doctor or healthcare provider if you have a low blood glucose reaction and do not know what caused it. If you pass out If you have type 1 diabetes and you do not take care of low blood glucose, you may pass out. If you do, a drug called glucagon should be injected into your skin, like you do with insulin. This can be done by a family member or friend who has been taught how to do it. Since glucagon may cause you to vomit, you should be placed on your side when the injection is given. I Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

This information describes diabetes, the complications related to the disease, and how you can prevent these complications. Blood Sugar Control Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar runs too high, usually due to not enough insulin. It can cause terrible long-term complications if it is not treated properly. The most common serious complications are blindness ("retinopathy"), kidney failure requiring dependence on a dialysis machine to stay alive ("nephropathy"), and foot and leg amputations. The good news is that these complications can almost always be prevented if you keep your blood sugar near the normal range. The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it's had enough to eat. It is also very important to limit saturated fats in your diet. Read food labels carefully to see which foods are high in saturated fats. Particular foods to cut down on are: whole milk and 2% milk, cheese, ice cream, fast foods, butter, bacon, sausage, beef, chicken with the skin on (skinless chicken is fine), doughnuts, cookies, chocolate, and nuts. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Keeping Track of Blood Sugar Checking blood sugar wi Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar And Chronic Kidney Disease

Low Blood Sugar And Chronic Kidney Disease

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice or diagnosis from a physician. The most common cause of kidney disease is diabetes. The bodies of people with diabetes do not use the hormone insulin properly or does not make insulin at all, so insulin injections or other diabetes medications are required. Because insulin helps keep the amount of sugar in the blood at a normal level, people with diabetes are at risk for both low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), especially when there are changes in diet, activity or medications. Blood sugar below 70 mg/dL is considered low. Kidney disease and the risk for low blood sugar The greatest risk of low blood sugar occurs in someone who has both chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes. Whether or not someone has diabetes, a person with CKD is at risk for low blood sugar because of changes in appetite and meal routine. When kidney function declines insulin and other diabetes medications remain in the system longer because of decreased kidney clearance. For a person with diabetes, insulin and other diabetes medications that lower blood sugar may require an adjustment to prevent low blood sugar. Causes of low blood sugar Common causes of low blood sugar include: Skipping meals or waiting too long to eat A decrease in usual food intake because of poor appetite Taking too much insulin or diabetes medicine Receiving insulin or diabetes medicine at the wrong time Increasing physical activity Drinking alcoholic beverages People with chronic kidney disease sometimes experience a loss of appetite that can lead to skipping meals or not eating enough. This often causes a drop in blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar Some of the symptoms Continue reading >>

Do You Know The Difference Between High Blood Sugar And Low Blood Sugar?

Do You Know The Difference Between High Blood Sugar And Low Blood Sugar?

If you have diabetes, you may experience high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. Learning how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels can help you avoid medical emergencies and help you control your diabetes better. It’s important to check your blood glucose levels as recommended by your doctor to determine if your blood sugar is within your target range. High blood sugar occurs when the sugar, or glucose level in your blood rises above normal. A number of things can cause you to have high blood sugar. If you have type 1 diabetes, you may have given yourself a lower amount of insulin than your doctor recommended. If you have type 2, your body may have enough insulin, but it’s not as effective as it should be. Other causes attributed to high blood sugars are: Overeating Not exercising enough Missing medicines High stress levels Illness High blood sugar usually develops slowly over a period of hours, but may rise quickly if overeating simple sugars, such as dessert-type foods. Low blood sugar occurs when the sugar (glucose) level in your blood drops below what your body needs. This can be caused by any number of things, but most often occurs when you: Haven’t eaten enough food, especially carbohydrates Skipped a meal or snack Took too much medicine Exercised more than usual Took other medications that caused your blood sugar level to drop Unlike symptoms of high blood sugar, low blood sugar symptoms can occur within 10 to 15 minutes. If your blood sugar level drops below your target range, you may feel weak, tired, anxious or shaky. Eating something with sugar usually returns your blood sugar to its normal range and you will begin to feel better within a few minutes. Try to avoid blood sugar Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And The Problems It Can Cause

High Blood Sugar And The Problems It Can Cause

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Symptoms And Diabetes

Blood Sugar Symptoms And Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a serious disease in which the pancreas stops producing the hormone insulin. The result is that your body can’t convert sugar into energy. There is no way to prevent type 1 diabetes and there is currently no known cure. Two of the potential warning signs of diabetes are high blood-sugar—or hyperglycemia—and low blood sugar—or hypoglycemia. Blood sugar levels symptoms: Highs and Lows Let’s start with hypoglycemia and look at blood-sugar drop symptoms. Although symptoms may overlap, some of the signs of low blood sugar include dizziness, sweating, shaking, poor coordination, hunger, nausea and irritability. When it comes to hyperglycemia (or sugar shock), you may feel thirsty, have to urinate more frequently, find your vision blurry, feel exhausted, have stomach pain, or notice a fruity or wine-like odor on your breath. See your doctor if you experience high or low blood sugar symptoms If your blood sugar drops to severely low levels it can lead to convulsions, coma or death. While prolonged high blood sugar can lead to eye, organ and other complications or diabetic ketoacidosis, which is also life-threatening. That’s why it’s important to see your doctor, explain which of the blood-sugar symptoms you’re feeling, and go from there. Your support is more critical than ever Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low blood sugar, which is called hypoglycemia, means your body does not have enough sugar in the blood to fuel all of your body’s cells. Typically a low blood sugar is defined as anything below 70 mg/dL (3.8 mmol). It is also sometimes called an “insulin reaction” or “insulin shock”. When your blood sugars drops below this level, you may begin to feel a variety of symptoms. As your body runs short on fuel, you may feel shaky, nervous, anxious, or irritable. You may begin to sweat or get the chills. Your heart may race. As your brain operates on less sugar, you may feel confused or delirious or get a headache. Each person feels different low blood sugar symptoms. Some don’t feel any symptoms at all, which is called hypoglycemia unawareness. It is important to learn and recognize your own symptoms. Sometimes, you may feel like you have low blood sugar even when you don’t. This can happen when you have had a high blood sugar for a long-time, such as at diagnosis, and your body is first coming back into the normal range. Although it may feel unpleasant, these symptoms will go away in a week or two and you will feel better than you did when you had high blood sugars all of the time. You may also feel symptoms of low blood sugar when your blood sugar is dropping rapidly. Your body is sensing the rapid loss of sugar for fuel and sending you warning signals. Don’t guess whether or not you have a low blood sugar. It is important to use your blood glucose meter to check your blood sugar and confirm before treating it. Studies have shown people are not good at guessing their blood sugars (but often think that they are). According to the American Diabetes Association, if you feel symptoms of low blood sugar and are unable to test your blood sugar, err on the side of Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is when the amount of sugar in your blood drops to 70 mg/dL or lower. It’s important to speak with your health care provider about what is considered low blood sugar for you. Low blood sugar is something that you need to be prepared to treat. You might get low blood sugar if you: Take certain medicines and eat too few carbohydrates (starches) or skip or delay a meal Take too much medicine (ask your diabetes care team if this applies to you) Are more physically active than usual Low blood sugar can happen suddenly. But in most cases, you will notice the signs and symptoms. Recognize low blood sugar early and take action It is important to identify the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar early so you can do something before it gets worse. Special Alert The signs and symptoms of low blood sugar may be less clear after you have had many episodes of low blood sugar. Some signs and symptoms might be so hard to notice that you don’t react to them quickly. Hypoglycemia unawareness, also known as low blood sugar unawareness, is abnormally low blood sugar readings without the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar. Weak or tired Hungry Dizzy or shaky Nervous or upset Sweaty Confused Like your mood is changing Like your head hurts Like your heart is beating too fast Like your eyesight is blurry What to do about low blood sugar Ask your health care provider what level of blood sugar is too low for you. For most people, it is 70 mg/dL or lower. Check your blood sugar right away if you have any symptoms of low blood sugar. If your blood sugar is low, or if you think your blood sugar is low, follow the 'Rule of 15.' This means treat your low blood sugar with 15 grams of carbohydrates (carbs). Wait 15 minutes. Test your blood sugar again, and if i Continue reading >>

How To Handle Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

How To Handle Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

When you have diabetes, you may have high or low blood sugar levels from time to time. It's important to know the signs and symptoms of each and follow your healthcare provider's instructions for handling them. Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar That Might Indicate I Have Diabetes?

What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar That Might Indicate I Have Diabetes?

Question: What are the symptoms of high blood sugar that might indicate I have diabetes? Answer: First of all there may not be any symptoms of high blood sugar, so it is worth screening if you have a strong family history, if you have a reason to think that you may have diabetes, because sometimes it's asymptomatic and it's important to know if your blood sugar is high and if you do have diabetes and get it under control early. But if the blood sugar goes very high then lets say over 200 or so, then it can cause symptoms and the classic symptoms would be increased thirst, increased urination, general fatigue, vaginal infections in women, and even blurred vision can occur from the high blood sugar. These symptoms, as I say, may not occur, or they may occur in any combination, but what's causing them is that the sugar is thickening the blood, so it's really like taking maple syrup and pouring maple syrup into a glass of water. If you do that after a while, the water gets thicker and thicker, and in the bloodstream, the brain then reads that as the blood's too thick, I need to drink in order to dilute back out the blood, and when I drink and I drink, sometime people with diabetes drink gallons of water in a day, when drink and I drink, I have to put it somewhere, and where I put it is to urinate it out. That's not really solving the problem, it's not really curing the diabetes in any way or treating it, but thirst and urination is the classic symptom of diabetes and indicates that you do need help. Next: What Is Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) And What Are Its Symptoms? Previous: What Causes High Blood Sugar And What Harm Can It Do To My Body? Continue reading >>

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