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What Are The Symptoms Of Diabetes In Women?

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

According to the latest American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, about 8 million people 18 years and older in the United States have type 2 diabetes and do not know it. Often type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed until symptoms become severe and hospitalization is required. Left untreated, diabetes can cause a number of health complications. That's why it's so important to both know what warning signs to look for and to see a health care provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Symptoms In incidences of prediabetes, there are no symptoms. People may not be aware that they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes because they have no symptoms or because the symptoms are so mild that they go unnoticed for quite some time. However, some individuals do experience warning signs, so it's important to be familiar with them. Prediabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes No symptoms Increased or extreme thirst Increased thirst Increased appetite Increased appetite Increased fatigue Fatigue Increased or frequent urination Increased urination, especially at night Unusual weight loss Weight loss Blurred vision Blurred vision Fruity odor or breath Sores that do not heal In some cases, no symptoms In some cases, no symptoms If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: If your blood glucose levels are in normal range, testing should be done about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes There are three ty Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Differs For Men And Women

How Diabetes Differs For Men And Women

Although anyone can develop type 2 diabetes, your lifestyle, age and family history can put you at a higher risk. Common signs of diabetes include weight loss or gain, increased thirst, frequent urination or urinary tract infections, tingling or numb extremities, and feeling lethargic all the time. Symptoms can develop gradually and can be somewhat difficult to notice; most people find out they are diabetic when they’re visiting the doctor for a different reason altogether. The Facts about Diabetes and Gender Recently, studies have revealed some differences in the impact of diabetes on women versus men. Statistics show that 11 percent of women in the United States age 20 and older have diabetes, a number just slightly less than men. One of the major differences is how the disease is diagnosed. The signs of diabetes in men tend to be more recognizable, making it easier for men to get diagnosed earlier. Men tend to develop type 2 diabetes at a younger age and at a lower weight, which means they receive more aggressive treatment sooner for both diabetes and the potential heart health risks it can bring. Women tend to be further along in the disease when they are diagnosed, making them far more susceptible to complications. Some of the ways diabetes symptoms in women have a greater impact on overall health include: Heart disease. Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women with diabetes. When a woman is diabetic, the risk for heart disease is six times higher than for women who do not have diabetes. Studies show that the risk of heart disease to women with diabetes is 50 percent higher than for men with diabetes. Hormonal problems. Women’s hormones can also affect the way they manage their diabetes; menopause can cause changes in blood sugar levels, and some Continue reading >>

What Are The Early Symptoms Of Diabetes?

What Are The Early Symptoms Of Diabetes?

If you have any of the following diabetes symptoms, see your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested: Urinate (pee) a lot, often at night Are very thirsty Lose weight without trying Are very hungry Have blurry vision Have numb or tingling hands or feet Feel very tired Have very dry skin Have sores that heal slowly Have more infections than usual People who have type 1 diabetes may also have nausea, vomiting, or stomach pains. Type 1 diabetes symptoms can develop in just a few weeks or months and can be severe. Type 1 diabetes usually starts when you’re a child, teen, or young adult but can happen at any age. Type 2 diabetes symptoms often develop over several years and can go on for a long time without being noticed (sometimes there aren’t any noticeable symptoms at all). Type 2 diabetes usually starts when you’re an adult, though more and more children, teens, and young adults are developing it. Because symptoms are hard to spot, it’s important to know the risk factors for type 2 diabetes and visit your doctor if you have any of them. Gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) usually shows up in the middle of the pregnancy and typically doesn’t have any symptoms. If you’re pregnant, you should be tested for gestational diabetes between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy so you can make changes if needed to protect your health and your baby’s health. Disclaimer: I am the co-founder of DeeveHealth. DeeveHealth is a mobile platform to prevent Type 2 diabetes. Based on the scientific behavior of human and science of prevention using data points. For more information check out our web-site Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Women

Diabetes Symptoms In Women

Diabetes symptoms in women are a common condition. According to NHS statistics diabetes affects 2.8 million people, both men and women, in the U.K. It is believed that a further 1 million have the condition but remain undiagnosed. 90% of all adults in the U.K. with diabetes have type 2. Managing diabetes whilst going through menopause can feel like a double challenge for many women due to the combined effects that each condition can have on the body. What Are The Different Types of Diabetes? Type 1 – A total lack of insulin Formerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes. The body’s immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, which results in the elimination of insulin production from the body. If you don’t have insulin in your body, cells cannot absorb sugar (glucose) which they need to produce energy. Type 2 – Too little insulin or cannot use insulin effectively Previously called adult-onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can develop at any age but is most commonly known for developing during adulthood. The main characteristic of type 2 diabetes is insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the body’s inability to respond to insulin. Resistance develops because of many factors:- Genetics Obesity Increasing age High blood sugar over a long period of time Gestational – Like type 2 but occurs in the later stages of pregnancy Normally disappears after the baby is born. You are more likely to develop gestational diabetes in future pregnancies. You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes as some stage. The Differences Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Signs and symptoms are usually very obvious and develop quickly. People seek medical help because they are seriously ill from symptoms of high blood su Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Women

Diabetes Symptoms In Women

What symptoms and signs of diabetes are the same for women and men? What is diabetes? What is prediabetes? Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that occurs when your blood sugar (glucose), is too high (hyperglycemia). Glucose is what the body uses for energy, and the pancreas produces a hormone called insulin that helps convert the glucose from the food you eat into energy. When the body does not produce enough insulin - or does not produce any at all - the glucose does not reach your cells to be used for energy. This results in diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is an autoimmune condition in which the body does not produce insulin because the body's immune system attacks insulin-producing cells from the pancreas called beta cells. Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This occurs when blood sugar gets too high over time, and the cells become insensitive to insulin. Prediabetes (sometimes spelled pre-diabetes) is a condition that often precedes type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is when your blood sugar is higher than normal, but not quite high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes. Prediabetes does not usually have any symptoms so there may be no warning signs. A blood test can confirm if you have prediabetes. If a person does not change their diet and lifestyle, prediabetes can become type 2 diabetes within 5 years. What signs and symptoms are unique to women with diabetes? Many type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms in women are the same as those in men; however, there are some symptoms and complications of diabetes unique to women. Vaginal itching and pain as well as vaginal and oral yeast infections: An overgrowth of Candida albicans fungus can cause vaginal yeast infections and oral yeas Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

How can you tell if you have diabetes? Most early symptoms are from higher-than-normal levels of glucose, a kind of sugar, in your blood. The warning signs can be so mild that you don't notice them. That's especially true of type 2 diabetes. Some people don't find out they have it until they get problems from long-term damage caused by the disease. With type 1 diabetes, the symptoms usually happen quickly, in a matter of days or a few weeks. They're much more severe, too. Both types of diabetes have some of the same telltale warning signs. Hunger and fatigue. Your body converts the food you eat into glucose that your cells use for energy. But your cells need insulin to bring the glucose in. If your body doesn't make enough or any insulin, or if your cells resist the insulin your body makes, the glucose can't get into them and you have no energy. This can make you more hungry and tired than usual. Peeing more often and being thirstier. The average person usually has to pee between four and seven times in 24 hours, but people with diabetes may go a lot more. Why? Normally your body reabsorbs glucose as it passes through your kidneys. But when diabetes pushes your blood sugar up, your kidneys may not be able to bring it all back in. This causes the body to make more urine, and that takes fluids. You'll have to go more often. You might pee out more, too. Because you're peeing so much, you can get very thirsty. When you drink more, you'll also pee more. Dry mouth and itchy skin. Because your body is using fluids to make pee, there's less moisture for other things. You could get dehydrated, and your mouth may feel dry. Dry skin can make you itchy. Blurred vision. Changing fluid levels in your body could make the lenses in your eyes swell up. They change shape and lose their a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Warning Signs

Diabetes Warning Signs

Diabetes Warning Signs Because type 2 diabetes can lead to some serious health complications, it's important to be aware of any diabetes warning signs and get tested for diabetes, if you have these symptoms. Treating diabetes early, when treatment is most effective, can help prevent these diabetes complications. We'll explain the various diabetes warning signs and also warning signs of specific diabetes problems. Discover why it's important to listen to your body and alert your doctor if you notice any new signs or problems. Warning Signs of Diabetes Sometimes type 2 diabetes can develop without any warnings signs. In fact, about a third of all people who have type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. That's why it's important to talk to your doctor about your risk for diabetes and determined if you should be tested. Common warnings signs of diabetes include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Blurred vision Diabetic coma (loss of consciousness) If you have any of the above mentioned warnings signs of diabetes, give your doctor a call and schedule a diabetes test. With the right diabetes diet, regular exercise, and medications, if needed, you can manage type 2 diabetes and live an active, productive life. If you have symptoms of the following diabetes complications, it's important to seek immediate medical attention. Each brief discussion links to more in-depth information. Hypoglycemia and Diabetes As you'll learn in this health topic, hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when the level of sugar or glucose in the blood drops too low to fuel the body. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a condition that results from a variety of causes. Hypoglycem Continue reading >>

Early Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Women

Early Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Women

Diabetes often strikes women differently due to a number of reasons, primary among them being the hormonal variations between men and women. Inflammation also acts differently in women. Considering that type 2 diabetes is a disease of chronic low-grade inflammation, it follows that warning signs, as well as disease progression in women, are different significantly, if not vastly. Diabetes is one of the biggest lifestyle diseases we see today. In just 25 years, the global incidence of diabetes has doubled, according to the World Health Organization. More than 15 million women are living with type 2 diabetes in the United States alone and another 40 million are prediabetic, according to CDC (Center for Disease Control) statistics of 2017. Symptoms of Diabetes in Women While many signs and symptoms of diabetes are common in men and women, women experience certain unique symptoms. These are: Vaginal and Oral Infections Overgrowth of a yeast called Candida albicans causes vaginal and oral yeast infections, called “thrush.” High levels of glucose in the blood are favorable for the growth of this yeast. Vaginal infections are accompanied by symptoms like soreness, itching, vaginal discharge and pain during sex. When the infection is oral, a cottage cheese-like coating is seen on the tongue and the inside of the mouth. Urinary Tract Infections The risk of UTIs is higher in women with diabetes. UTIs occur when bacteria gain access to the urinary tract, where they colonize and cause infection. Signs and symptoms include painful urination, burning sensation while urination, fever and cloudy (sometimes bloody) urine. High blood glucose levels, poor circulation and the inability of immune cells to effectively fight bacteria are all causes of UTIs. Poor Sexual Health High levels Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes In Women

Signs Of Diabetes In Women

Women are just as likely to develop diabetes as men. In addition, they have their own type of diabetes: gestational diabetes is specific to pregnant women only. The signs and symptoms of the three types of diabetes women may develop are similar, and may appear at various stages throughout the disease. Being aware of the signs can not only help diagnose diabetes in women but can help avoid potentially serious complications of the disease. Video of the Day Diabetic ketoacidosis is responsible for a number of diabetes symptoms, the first of which is excessive thirst. Excessive thirst associated with diabetes is not the same as just being thirsty. Rather, you may feel your thirst is insatiable. No matter how much water or other liquids you drink, you may still feel parched. Diabetic ketoacidosis can also lead to unusual levels of fatigue. This type of fatigue is more than just a feeling of tiredness. Rather, you may feel like you can barely keep your eyes open. Fatigue associated with diabetes may also leave you feeling weak, and make movement and activity difficult. Women with type 1 diabetes, sometimes referred to as juvenile diabetes, lose the ability to make enough insulin for proper breakdown of food. Without this ability, little sugar is absorbed into the bloodstream and weight loss can follow. During pregnancy, the body's need for insulin may increase beyond what it can produce. While this is not often discovered until the second or third trimester, rapid or excessive weight gain beyond what is expected during pregnancy can be an indicator of gestational diabetes. Diabetes may also affect how efficiently the kidneys function. Urinary frequency that is unusual can be an indicator of too much glucose in the bloodstream. This can occur when insulin levels are not suffic Continue reading >>

What Are The Early Symptoms Of Diabetes Type 2? What Factors Were Responsible For Your Diabetes?

What Are The Early Symptoms Of Diabetes Type 2? What Factors Were Responsible For Your Diabetes?

11 Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes (Explained in details) The dangers of type 2 diabetes cannot be overemphasized this is due to its nature because it doesn’t necessarily cause any obvious symptoms. It is known as ‘silent killer’ because it doesn’t show earlier signs. There are cases where doctors do not detect diabetes until long-term complications associated with the disease, develop. Some of the diseases are heart problems and eye diseases. It is advisable for one to go on regular checks in order to prevent type 2 diabetes. Prevention of this disease can be achieved through regular checking of blood sugar levels. If you think you may have diabetes, seek treatment as soon as possible. The better you manage diabetes over time, the less like you are to develop serious complications. The following signs, symptoms and conditions can be associated with type 2 diabetes Frequent Need to Urinate [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="810"] Photo Credit: joebelanger / Stock photos, royalty-free images & video clips[/caption] Medically, this is known as polyuria and it is one of the early signs of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Frequent need to urinate occurs when the blood sugar levels is elevated above 160-180mg/dL therefore, glucose begins to leak into the urine. Consequently, the amount of glucose in the urine increases, the kidney starts to work harder to eliminate more water in an attempt to dilute the urine. This is enough for a diabetic to feel the urge to urinate more often. Increased Thirst [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="810"] This is not unconnected with the first symptom. As a diabetic patient urinates more often, he/she gets dehydrated faster, therefore sending signals to the brain to get more water. Drinking more water will aggravate the need t Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

Symptoms In Women

Symptoms In Women

Diabetes is a common health condition among women all around the world and it is extremely essential to be aware of the diabetes symptoms. Below, you will be given complete information on the causes, symptoms and types of diabetes that affect women. Diabetes in Women Increases Diabetes is essentially a metabolic disorder that occurs as a result of elevated glucose levels in the blood. Although both women and men can be impacted by diabetes, the diabetes rate in women has considerably increased in recent years. Furthermore, studies have indicated that women are at more risk of becoming affected by the causes of diabetes in comparison to men. Therefore, more focus will be placed on being aware of the symptoms in women. Medically, this health condition is referred to as diabetes mellitus. Primarily, diabetes can be categorized into two types; they are Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 is also referred to as juvenile diabetes because it is seen commonly in young children, adults and teenagers typically in the age range of 25 to 30 years. This takes place when the pancreas is incapable of producing insulin, which has the responsibility to transport glucose to the cells of the body. When the body fails to produce an adequate amount of insulin; the level of glucose in the blood increases. That increase results in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes typically occurs in individuals who are middle-aged and older and are afflicted with obesity issues. Type 2 diabetes typically comes about because of poor eating habits and a sedentary lifestyle. In such a case, insulin is produced by the pancreas; however, the body becomes immune to the insulin. It is unable to properly use the insulin, resulting in glucose being present in the blood. Gestational diabetes is another type of diabetes which occurs in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hits Women Hard At Menopause: Beat It Back

Diabetes Hits Women Hard At Menopause: Beat It Back

hits women hard, especially at midlife. In the United States, it’s the number 6 killer of women ages 45 to 54 and the number 4 killer of women ages 55 to 64. What’s more, diabetes increases your risk of heart disease, stroke, and many other serious conditions, including blindness, kidney disease, and nerve disease. Diabetes is on the rise in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1 in 10 US adults has diabetes now, and if current trends continue, that figure could rise to 1 in 3 by 2050. The increase is nearly all because of the rise of type 2 diabetes, which is most common in obese people age 40 and older. (Type 1 diabetes is much less common and usually starts in childhood or adolescence.) A huge proportion of US adults—more than a third of all of them and half over age 65—have prediabetes, and thus are poised to develop the full-blown disease. Does menopause increase diabetes risk? That hasn’t been an easy question for researchers to answer. It’s hard to separate the effects of menopause from the effects of age and weight. But it does look like hormones do have something to do with it. If you are a woman over age 50, you’re especially vulnerable, and women pay a heavy price for the disease. They lose more years of life than men with diabetes do. In addition, the death rate for women with diabetes has risen dramatically since the 1970s, while it has not for men with the disease. Age and overweight (or obesity) are the most common traits that make someone likely to develop type 2 diabetes. A family history of diabetes, prediabetes, minority ethnicity (Hispanic, African American, Native American, Asian, or Pacific Islander), high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease or abnormal cholesterol levels, and inact Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Women With Condition Reveal How They Changed Their Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Women With Condition Reveal How They Changed Their Diet

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. A diagnosis of type 2 diabetes means people have to look after their own health. This includes maintaining good physical and mental health, preventing illness or accidents and dealing with minor ailments and long-term conditions. However, a diagnosis doesn’t have to spell the end of a full and happy life, Vitality Health and Life insurance has reiterated. Anna Cartien, 59, was diagnosed two years ago with type 2 diabetes. When she was first diagnosed, Anna immediately told herself she was going to have to ‘buckle down and get it under control’. “It wasn’t easy at first for me to stick to my new habits, but I now feel fantastic,” she said. “I wish I had made these changes earlier.” With a positive mindset, she has adopted a daily exercise routine, eats healthy meals and was even able to do what she thought impossible - quit smoking. When in hospital for kidney stones, Anna’s blood glucose levels were tested which resulted in a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. Prior to this, she had been excessively urinating and felt constantly tired. She now exercises daily, putting in 35 minutes on a rowing machine, and doing about twenty minutes of yoga. Within six months of being diagnosed, Anna lost 20 kg (45lbs), however she said making this change wasn’t easy. “Increasing my exercise was the thing I was most opposed to,” she admits. “I’m glad I made the change though, as it has made a big difference to how I feel”, she said. Anna began a low-carb diet immediately after being diagnosed. Continue reading >>

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