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What Are The Symptoms Of Diabetes In Dogs?

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Overview of diabetes insipidus Most everyone is familiar with the term “diabetes;” it is a common human disease. But our four-legged friends can get diabetes, too. There are different types of diabetes, one being diabetes insipidus—an uncommon disorder that affects our pet’s ability to conserve water. Because of this disease, your dog or cat urinates and drinks water excessively in an attempt to keep up with the loss of water through the urine. There are two types of diabetes insipidus. One is due to the insufficient production of a hormone called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) that regulates the body’s ability to absorb water from the kidneys. The other form of diabetes insipidus is caused by the kidneys’ inability to respond to ADH. The kidneys are responsible for regulating the water in your pet’s body. So, without this hormone or the kidney’s response to it, your dog or cat can’t conserve water. Access to water is critical for pets with diabetes insipidus—without it, a dog or cat can become dehydrated in as little as 4–6 hours. Generally, diabetes insipidus is considered idiopathic, which means the ultimate cause is unknown. Possible causes include congenital issues, trauma, metabolic conditions, kidney disease, adverse reactions to certain medications, or tumors of the pituitary gland. Despite the underlying cause of diabetes insipidus, the symptoms are the same. They include: Diagnosis of diabetes insipidus Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam and take a detailed history of your pet’s health. The symptoms of diabetes insipidus are very similar to other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus (“sugar diabetes”), Cushing’s syndrome, liver or kidney disease, Addison’s disease, and hypo-/hyperthyroidism. Your veterinarian may Continue reading >>

Common Symptoms Of Dogs And Cats With Diabetes

Common Symptoms Of Dogs And Cats With Diabetes

Pets with diabetes look unkempt and act lethargic. Because they lose sugar in the urine, and sugar pulls water molecules out with it, they urinate excessively. This causes them to drink excessively. These activities, excessive urination (polyuria) and excessive drinking (polydipsia), are termed PUPD. Pets with diabetes lose weight and lose muscle mass. They may have a lower body temperature than normal pets. Additional symptoms of diabetes in dogs and cats may include: Excessive drinking & urination (PUPD) Loss of appetite Vomiting Dehydration Depression & lethargy Unkempt haircoat & dandruff Loss of muscles & weakness Weight loss Cataracts Weakness of the back legs Diabetes is diagnosed with blood and urine tests. The normal blood sugar (blood glucose) for dogs is 60-125 mg/dl; for cats, 70-150 mg/dl. Diabetes is diagnosed when blood sugars are consistently elevated a significant amount. For example, 220 mg/dl in a dog or 400mg/dl in a cat. If your pet is anxious when it visits the veterinarian, his or her blood sugar will naturally rise, and the elevation may be as high as the sugar levels in a diabetic pet. To prevent this stress-related elevation of blood sugar, find a veterinarian and a clinic that calms your pet. Or, use a veterinarian who makes house calls. Remember that one or two blood tests showing elevated blood sugar doesn't prove that your pet has diabetes. Blood sugar levels must be consistently elevated, or your pet must have urine tests showing ketones to prove they have diabetes. There are two ways urine tests indicate diabetes: sugar in the urine or ketones in the urine. Sugar gets into the urine if your pet's blood carries so much sugar that it exceeds the kidneys' ability to hold onto sugar. This is called exceeding the renal glucose threshold. A uri Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms & Treatment

Chances are you’ve known someone who has diabetes. So you know it takes a lot of work to manage the disease. There’s the regular glucose testing and always being prepared for unexpected shifts in blood sugar levels. At the same time, diabetes is a manageable condition and those who develop it usually carry on normal lives once their condition is under control. But when we think of diabetes, we usually don’t think about our canine companions. Just like people, our pups can become diabetic too. And like diabetic people, diabetic dogs can live normal lives with proper care and treatment. Overview of Dog Diabetes When it comes to dog diabetes, there are similarities between pooches and pet parents. Dog diabetes can be classified as either Type I or Type II. Dogs most frequently develop Type I, which means their pancreas is not producing insulin. Diabetes Type II, which is actually more common in cats, means your pet is not correctly processing the insulin that is being produced. With either diagnosis, your dog’s blood sugar will rise and cause an excessive amount of glucose in the blood. While there’s no cure for dog diabetes, once the symptoms are identified and treatment is outlined, there’s a good chance your dog will lead a relatively normal life. Common Dog Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes is most commonly seen in middle–aged and older dogs, but it’s not unheard of in younger dogs. If you see any of the following behaviors in your doggy, young or old, get them to a veterinarian as soon as possible. The earlier the diagnosis, the better the chances are that your dog will enjoy a healthy life. So what are the symptoms of diabetes in dogs? Change in appetite Weight loss Excessive thirst Increased urination Urinary tract infections Cloudy eyes Lethargy Dehydratio Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes mellitus is a disease resulting from the body’s inability to produce or use insulin. Insulin is a hormone released by the pancreas in response to protein digestion. Normally, proteins are converted to glucose which is then carried into the cells by insulin. When insulin is not produced or cannot be used, cells lose their main energy source and unused glucose builds up in the bloodstream (hyperglycemia). Untreated diabetes can lead to organ failure, blindness, coma and death. Diabetes mellitus occurs when the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin. Insulin is required for the body to efficiently use sugars, fats and proteins. There are two types of diabetes, with the most common striking 1 of every 500 dogs. Veterinarians commonly diagnosis canine diabetes in patients that are middle-aged, female, and overweight. The following symptoms are strong indicators that a pet may have diabetes: Increased appetite Weight loss (with increased appetite) Excessive thirst Excessive urination Bladder or kidney infection Signs of advanced diabetes include: Blindness Anorexia Lethargy Vomiting Cataracts Seizures Collapse Types Diabetes mellitus is grouped into two types based on disease pathology: Type I - The more severe of the two forms. The body is unable to produce insulin. Treatment is with daily injections of insulin. 99% of diabetes in dogs is Type I. Type II - In this form, the body produces insulin, however the cells are unable to use the insulin. Type II can be treated with oral medications. Only 1% of dogs have Type II diabetes. Approximately one in 500 dogs will develop diabetes. The exact cause is unknown, but certain dogs are at increased risk for developing diabetes: Obese dogs Female dogs (twice as likely to develop diabetes) Older dogs (7-9 years) Autoimmune Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Devastating But Preventable Disease That Threatens Your Pet

Diabetes: The Devastating But Preventable Disease That Threatens Your Pet

As of this writing, I haven’t yet seen a copy of The Diabetes Report, but from what I gather from the linked article and others I’ve read, it approaches the subject from the viewpoint of managing the disease, not preventing it. And yet, the report makes the following points: Diabetes is tied to obesity. Did the authors point out that obesity in dogs and cats is clearly preventable? Diabetes is more common in older animals. Does the report then make the point that since diabetes occurs primarily in older animals -- but isn’t a disease of aging -- it is therefore a disease brought on by lifestyle obstacles? Pet owners can prevent unhealthy lifestyles for their pets. According to vetlearn.com, The Diabetes Report references a study done in 2006, which showed that “… insulin was stopped in twice as many cats that were on a high protein-low carb diet than cats on a high fiber-low carb diet." Common sense seems to dictate, if a high-protein, low-carb diet can eliminate the need for insulin in cats with diabetes, it seems logical the same diet might prevent kitties -- and their canine counterparts -- from developing the disease in the first place. I suspect one of the reasons more cats than dogs get diabetes is because so many cats eat kibble-only diets. Not only do kitties require very few carbs and fiber, which most kibbles (dry food) are loaded with, but more cats are fed dry food because if their owners need to be away from home, they can stay alone for a few days with a litter box, water, and a supply of dry food that won’t spoil at room temperature. In many ways, kitties are lower maintenance than dogs, so people who are gone from home frequently are more likely to have cats as pets and feed them a diet that is convenient. Add to that the finicky appetite of Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus (diabetes) In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus (diabetes) In Dogs

Animals Affected Dogs Overview Diabetes mellitus (known simply as diabetes) is a serious disease of dogs. The main characteristic of diabetes is an inability to control the level of sugar in the blood. This leads to chronically high blood sugar levels, which in turn lead to the symptoms of the disease. Management of diabetes in dogs is challenging but possible. With proper treatment, many diabetic dogs lead essentially normal lives. However, without treatment the disease inevitably leads to serious complications. Diabetes in dogs is similar to type 1 (juvenile onset) diabetes in humans. Symptoms Symptoms of diabetes include: Weight loss Normal or increased appetite in the early stages of the disease; appetite may decline in the later stages. Lethargy A sudden change in the appearance of the eyes due to the formation of cataracts. In the end stages of the disease, coma and death Risk Factors and Prevention A genetic or hereditary predisposition to diabetes appears to be a primary risk factor. Dogs that suffer from one or multiple bouts of pancreatitis may develop diabetes as a consequence of damage to the pancreas. Dogs aged 4 - 14 years are at highest risk of pancreatitis. Female dogs are diagnosed with diabetes more often than males. Miniature Poodles, Miniature Schnauzers, Pugs, Samoyeds, and Toy Poodles suffer diabetes at higher rates than other breeds. Syndromes such as Cushing's disease and periodontal disease predispose dogs to diabetes. Complications Untreated diabetes leads to emaciation, chronic lethargy and weakness. Diabetic dogs are prone to urinary tract infections. House soiling may occur as well, due to increased frequency of urination. Insulin administration is the main method of treating diabetes in dogs. However, some dogs may suffer from accidental ov Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes In Dogs

Signs Of Diabetes In Dogs

Symptoms are referred to as "clinical signs" or "signs" in animals. High blood glucose concentrations produce the signs of diabetes mellitus. The "glucose threshold" of the kidneys can be exceeded due to excessive glucose in the blood resulting in the excretion of glucose in the urine. Your dog's increased rate of urination results in extra bodily fluid loss and causes your diabetic dog to drink more. A diabetic animal may suffer weight loss despite eating more than normal due to the loss of glucose, an important fuel (energy source). See Diabetes mellitus in dogs for further information on glucose metabolism. Typical signs of diabetes in dogs polyuria - urinating too much polydipsia - drinking too much water weight loss despite polyphagia - increased appetite lethargy Continue reading >>

Symptoms And Signs Of Diabetes In Dogs

Symptoms And Signs Of Diabetes In Dogs

How Diabetes Affects Dogs There are two types of canine diabetes – diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Of these, diabetes mellitus – particularly Type 1 or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus - is by far the most common. In healthy animals, insulin is produced and released by specialized cells in the pancreas. Insulin is needed for glucose from ingested food to pass into cells and tissues, where it can be processed and used for energy. Dogs with Type 1 diabetes mellitus do not have enough insulin in their blood streams, because their specialized pancreatic cells are either absent or not functioning normally. This prevents them from properly metabolizing dietary sugar, which in turn causes abnormally high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) and levels of glucose in their urine (glycosuria). Dogs with excess urinary glucose tend to excrete very large amounts of urine, leading to dehydration and unusual thirst. The metabolic abnormalities associated with diabetes mellitus initially increase a dog’s appetite because its cells are unable to take in and use dietary sugars. This is called “going into starvation mode.” The dog’s body starts breaking down stored fat for energy. This causes certain acid byproducts of fat metabolism called “ketones” to build up in the blood. Ultimately, this can cause a very serious and life-threatening condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis. Disruption of the complex metabolic system can lead to a number of different symptoms. While many of these are vague and non-specific, taken together they can suggest the presence of diabetes mellitus and may help owners and veterinarians arrive at an early diagnosis. Symptoms of Diabetes in Dogs Owners of dogs with diabetes mellitus may notice one or more of the following signs in thei Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs And Cats

Diabetes In Dogs And Cats

I wrote this article some time ago, but search engines still default to it. So instead of reading it: If you have a diabetic cat, go here. If your pet is a dog, go here. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes mellitus is a disease of your pet's endocrine gland system. One of these endocrine glands, the pancreas, is responsible for regulating your pet's blood sugar level. There are two forms of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a deficiency of insulin - the hormone that regulates how sugar is absorbed and utilized by the cells of the body. This Insulin is produced by the pancreas gland which is nestled among the loops of your pet's small intestines. A situation similar to Type l diabetes is the most common form in dogs. A situation similar to Type ll diaetes is the most common form in cats. Two things influence your pet's susceptibility to diabetes - its weight and its genetics. As in humans, pets that are overweight are more susceptible to developing Type 2 diabetes. Certain breeds also appear more susceptible to developing diabetes. These include miniature schnauers, toy and miniature poodles, samoyeds, australian terriers, elkhounds, dachsunds, westies, and pugs (ref) as well as burmese cats (ref). Other breeds, like german shephers, pit bulls and golden retrievers rarely develop the problem. Neutered dogs are considerably more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than un-neutered pets, quite likely due to the known tendency for neutered pets to become fat , but just being a female pet apears to add risk as well. The mean age that dogs develop diabetes is 7-9 years. with cats tending to develop the disease a year or two later in life. Your pet's many endocrine glands work in tandum, often relying on the hormonal signals of one gland to stimulate the activity Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Even dogs eating healthy diets can suffer from diabetes. As with diabetes in humans, sometimes a dog’s body’s stops producing enough insulin or the cells of a dog’s body are unable to use the insulin that is produced. When either condition occurs, the result is diabetes mellitus, which causes excessive thirst and urination and extreme hunger accompanied by weight loss. To stabilize sugar levels, insulin therapy is the treatment at the outset and is usually required for the life of the dog. Summary Diabetes mellitus is a disease that manifests as an inability of the animal’s body to use carbohydrates (sugars) properly. This occurs either because the pancreas does not manufacture sufficient quantities of the hormone the body requires for this function (insulin) or because the body’s cells no longer recognize insulin properly. The downside of this fundamental aberration in carbohydrate utilization is that these basic, energy providing nutrients (sugars) are not able to enter the body’s cells to “feed” them. Instead, they linger in the bloodstream while the body itself literally starves. By way of handling this starvation state, the body does things like start to break down certain tissues, fats for example, and mobilize stored sugar (glucose) in the body to attempt to generate energy with which to feed itself. In the absence of the insulin required to allow sugars to gain entry to the cells, these efforts typically lead to a dangerous metabolic state called ketosis. Moreover, when sensitive tissues like the brain don’t receive the required amount of energy, serious neurologic disruption — and death — can ensue. Diabetes mellitus is considered a multifactorial disease in origin, meaning that a variety of factors play into its individual acquisition. In Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Unfortunately, we veterinarians are seeing an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This is likely due to the growing prevalence of obesity (secondary to inactive lifestyle, a high carbohydrate diet, lack of exercise, etc.). So, if you just had a dog or cat diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, what do you do? First, we encourage you to take a look at these articles for an explanation of the disease: Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) in Dogs Once you have a basic understanding of diabetes mellitus (or if you already had one), this article will teach you about life-threatening complications that can occur as a result of the disease; specifically, I discuss a life-threatening condition called diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) so that you know how to help prevent it! What is DKA? When diabetes goes undiagnosed, or when it is difficult to control or regulate, the complication of DKA can occur. DKA develops because the body is so lacking in insulin that the sugar can’t get into the cells -- resulting in cell starvation. Cell starvation causes the body to start breaking down fat in an attempt to provide energy (or a fuel source) to the body. Unfortunately, these fat breakdown products, called “ketones,” are also poisonous to the body. Symptoms of DKA Clinical signs of DKA include the following: Weakness Not moving (in cats, hanging out by the water bowl) Not eating to complete anorexia Large urinary clumps in the litter box (my guideline? If it’s bigger than a tennis ball, it’s abnormal) Weight loss (most commonly over the back), despite an overweight body condition Excessively dry or oily skin coat Abnormal breath (typically a sweet “ketotic” odor) In severe cases DKA can also result in more significant signs: Abnormal breathing pattern Jaundice Ab Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes in dogs is a complex disease caused by either a lack of the hormone insulin or an inadequate response to insulin. After a dog eats, his digestive system breaks food into various components, including glucose-which is carried into his cells by insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas. When a dog does not produce insulin or cannot utilize it normally, his blood sugar levels elevate. The result is hyperglycemia, which, if left untreated, can cause many complicated health problems for a dog. It is important to understand, however, that diabetes is considered a manageable disorder-and many diabetic dogs can lead happy, healthy lives. Diabetes can be classified as either Type 1 (lack of insulin production) or Type II (impaired insulin production along with an inadequate response to the hormone.) The most common form of the disease in dogs is Type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes, which occurs when the pancreas is incapable of producing or secreting adequate levels of insulin. Dogs who have Type I require insulin therapy to survive. Type II diabetes is found in cats and is a lack of normal response to insulin. The following symptoms should be investigated as they could be indicators that your dog has diabetes: Change in appetite Excessive thirst/increase in water consumption Weight loss Increased urination Unusually sweet-smelling or fruity breath Lethargy Dehydration Urinary tract infections Vomiting Cataract formation, blindness The exact cause of diabetes is unknown. However, autoimmune disease, genetics, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, certain medications and abnormal protein deposits in the pancreas can play a major role in the development of the disease. It is thought that obese dogs and female dogs may run a greater risk of developing diabetes later in life (6-9 Continue reading >>

How To Detect Diabetes In Dogs

How To Detect Diabetes In Dogs

Expert Reviewed Two Methods:Knowing if Your Dog is More Susceptible to DiabetesDetecting Diabetes in DogsCommunity Q&A Diabetic animals are unable to produce enough insulin to properly regulate their blood sugar. Insulin is responsible for transmitting sugars to cells for energy. With an excess of sugar in their system and without enough energy at the cellular level, diabetic dogs lose weight, get cataracts, and suffer from bladder infections and kidney disease. There is no cure for diabetes, but the earlier you detect canine diabetes, the more effective the treatment will be. Some dogs are more susceptible to diabetes and you should know if your dog is one of them. If your dog is, you need to pay closer attention to the warning signs. 1 Recognize that overweight dogs are more likely to become diabetic. Canine diabetes can start when a dog is heavier than average. The best way to see if this could be an issue for your dog is by checking your dog's rib cage. Run your hand along your dog's rib cage. You should be able to feel the ribs easily. If not, your dog may be overweight. Some dogs have incredibly long and thick coats which may make it more difficult to feel their ribs. Another good test is to feel for their back hip bones. If you can feel them by pressing down lightly, then your dog is probably not overweight. If your pet is overweight, talk to your veterinarian about safely decreasing calories and increasing exercise. There are special diets that may be appropriate or you may achieve success with your dog by cutting down on treats and snacks and adding in a few more walks per week. 2 Take note if your dog is older than seven. Diabetes usually develops in dogs between the ages of seven and nine. As your dog gets older, decreased exercise can lead to weight gain. Th Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes In Dogs? The Signs, Symptoms And What To Do About It

What Causes Diabetes In Dogs? The Signs, Symptoms And What To Do About It

Did you know one out of every 300 dogs is diagnosed with diabetes? Especially in senior and middle aged dogs, diabetes is becoming frighteningly common in dogs today. Once your dog gets diabetes, he will most likely need insulin for the rest of his life. So it’s really important to do everything you can to prevent your dog from becoming diabetic. There are many things that can contribute to the risk of your dog getting diabetes … but the good news is, there are also lots of things you can do to help prevent it and minimize the risk. So we called on an expert to tell us how to do that. At Raw Roundup 2017, Dr Jean Hofve gave a talk on canine diabetes and its connection to diet and environmental factors and the best ways to prevent it. But first, what is diabetes and what’s the difference between the two types of the disease? What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is all about glucose and how the body handles it. All cells use glucose as their primary source of energy. The pancreas produces the hormones that control glucose … primarily insulin and glucagon. The pancreas is mostly made up of tissue that secretes digestive enzymes … but about 5% of the pancreas is made up of beta cells that produce insulin.The body’s cells need glucose for energy – it’s their primary fuel. But glucose can’t get into those cells without the help of insulin. Dr Hofve explains insulin as the key to a lock … the cells need the “key” (insulin) to let the glucose in. When glucose can’t get into the cells without insulin, it builds up in the blood. This causes hyperglycemia, meaning too much sugar in the blood (hyper = too much, glyc = sugar and emia = in the blood) This is why the pancreas and its creation of insulin is so important. And when it’s not working right, your dog can b Continue reading >>

How To Care For A Diabetic Dog

How To Care For A Diabetic Dog

Expert Reviewed Humans are not the only mammal that can get diabetes. Dogs can develop diabetes, especially later in life. If your dog has diabetes, there are many ways you can care for your dog. Make sure to medicate your dog with insulin correctly. Make changes to your dog's lifestyle to promote its health. Deal with the complications of a diabetic dog. You will have to be extra careful about managing things like vacations. 1 Make a plan for your dog's health with your vet. Diabetes requires swift treatment, but the treatment plan depends on your dog's current health. Insulin is usually required, and the vet will determine the amount. You also may have to make certain lifestyle changes. A long talk with a veterinarian is the first step [1] A simple test can diagnose diabetes in your dog. Your vet can also do blood tests to see how diabetes is affecting your dog's body. The sooner you begin treatment, the better. Your dog's health will suffer as long as diabetes goes untreated. Make sure to ask your vet any questions you have. Treating diabetes can be tricky, so you want to leave the office with a clear treatment plan in mind. If the vet has any pamphlets you can take home, take them with you. 2 Draw insulin correctly. You will have to give your dog insulin injections regularly. Make sure you know how to draw insulin safely. You will need a syringe to do so. Prior to injecting your dog, carefully draw out the correct amount of insulin.[2] First, remove the cap from the needle. Then, you will pull back the plunger of the needle until you reach the appropriate dose. Stick the needle in the spongy top of the bottle of insulin. Push down on the plunger, pushing air into the bottle. This will create a vacuum that allows you to more easily draw insulin from the bottle. Pull Continue reading >>

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