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What Are The Main Causes Of Diabetes?

“sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes”: Did The Film What The Health Get It Right?

“sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes”: Did The Film What The Health Get It Right?

The documentary What the Health is receiving a huge amount of attention and most of it is positive. Many reports of people attempting to eat better are filling social media. I discussed the film on a local TV station in Detroit after two reporters indicated that the movie had made a big impact on their diets. There have even been reports that restaurants serving healthier fare have seen an uptick in customers attributing the change to the film. I have seen this in my own plant-based restaurant and have a What The Health Happy Hour that has been very popular. Naturally, there have been critics of the movie defending their viewpoint that meat based diets are healthy, but most have rallied around a statement in the film by Neal Barnard, MD that “sugar does not cause diabetes”. As the answer to this question may be important to you, I have done some research and share it here but this is in NO way an endorsement to add back soda and candy bars to your diet. In a world stressed by growing obesity and its medical consequences, limiting sugar is a universal recommendation from all health experts. 1) Type 1 diabetes is not caused by sugar. All agree on this as type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease leading to destruction of the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. However, patients with type 1 diabetes can develop and reverse insulin resistance (IR) in their muscles and liver so understanding the origin of IR is important. 2) Who is Neal Barnard, MD? Dr. Barnard is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and an adjunct associate professor of medicine there. He has published over 70 scientific publications (including long term studies on diet and diabetes) and 18 books including several New York Times bestsellers on health and diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2) (cont.)

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2) (cont.)

A A A Type 1 diabetes (T1D): The body stops producing insulin or produces too little insulin to regulate blood glucose level. Type 1 diabetes affects about 10% of all people with diabetes in the United States. Type 1 diabetes is typically diagnosed during childhood or adolescence. It used to be referred to as juvenile-onset diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Insulin deficiency can occur at any age due to destruction of the pancreas by alcohol, disease, or removal by surgery. Type 1 diabetes also results from progressive failure of the pancreatic beta cells, the only cell type that produces significant amounts of insulin. People with type 1 diabetes require daily insulin treatment to sustain life. Type 2 diabetes (T2D): Although the pancreas still secretes insulin, the body of someone with type 2 diabetes is partially or completely incapable of responding to insulin. This is often referred to as insulin resistance. The pancreas tries to overcome this resistance by secreting more and more insulin. People with insulin resistance develop type 2 diabetes when they fail to secrete enough insulin to cope with their body's demands. At least 90% of adult individuals with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is typically diagnosed during adulthood, usually after age 45 years. It was once called adult-onset diabetes mellitus, or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. These names are no longer used because type 2 diabetes does occur in young people, and some people with type 2 diabetes require insulin therapy. Type 2 diabetes is usually controlled with diet, weight loss, exercise, and/or oral medications. However, more than half of all people with type 2 diabetes require insulin to control their blood sugar levels at some point during the course of their i Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

The Facts Diabetes is a condition where people don't produce enough insulin to meet their body's needs and/or their cells don't respond properly to insulin. Insulin is important because it moves glucose, a simple sugar, into the body's cells from the blood. It also has a number of other effects on metabolism. The food that people eat provides the body with glucose, which is used by the cells as a source of energy. If insulin isn't available or doesn't work correctly to move glucose from the blood into cells, glucose will stay in the blood. High blood glucose levels are toxic, and cells that don't get glucose are lacking the fuel they need. There are two main kinds of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. More than 90% of all people with diabetes have type 2. A 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) report estimated that about 3.4 million Canadians have diabetes. Only about two-thirds of people with type 2 diabetes are aware of it and are receiving treatment because, for many people, early symptoms are not noticeable without testing. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas cannot make insulin. Everyone with type 1 diabetes requires insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. It usually occurs in adults, although in some cases children may be affected. People with type 2 diabetes usually have a family history of this condition and are most often overweight. People with type 2 diabetes may eventually need insulin injections. This condition occurs most commonly in people of First Nations descent, Hispanics, and North Americans of African descent. Another less common form is gestational diabetes, a temporary condition that occurs during pregnancy. According to the CDA, depend Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. The notion is understandable. Blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, so a common idea has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. However, the major diabetes organizations take a different view. The American Diabetes Association1 and Diabetes UK2 have labelled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center,3 which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Here is what you need to know: Sugar Is the Body’s Fuel The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort glucose into the cells. What causes insulin resistance? It appears to be caused by an accumulation of microscopic fat particles within muscle and Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes can strike anyone, from any walk of life. And it does – in numbers that are dramatically increasing. In the last decade, the cases of people living with diabetes jumped almost 50 percent – to more than 30 million Americans. Worldwide, it afflicts more than 422 million people. And the World Health Organization estimates that by 2030, that number of people living with diabetes will more than double. Today, diabetes takes more lives than AIDS and breast cancer combined -- claiming the life of 1 American every 3 minutes. It is a leading cause of blindness, kidney failure, amputations, heart failure and stroke. Living with diabetes places an enormous emotional, physical and financial burden on the entire family. Annually, diabetes costs the American public more than $245 billion. Just what is diabetes? To answer that, you first need to understand the role of insulin in your body. When you eat, your body turns food into sugars, or glucose. At that point, your pancreas is supposed to release insulin. Insulin serves as a “key” to open your cells, to allow the glucose to enter -- and allow you to use the glucose for energy. But with diabetes, this system does not work. Several major things can go wrong – causing the onset of diabetes. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the most common forms of the disease, but there are also other kinds, such as gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy, as well as other forms. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 2 diabetes? Do you want to learn more about a cure for diabetes? We're developing a DRI BioHub mini organ to restore natural insulin production in those living with diabetes. Watch the BioHub video>> Keep up with the latest updates on the DRI BioHub. Be a DRInsider today. It's free and easy to sign up. Join no Continue reading >>

#worldhealthday: Unruly Lifestyle A Major Cause For Diabetes In India

#worldhealthday: Unruly Lifestyle A Major Cause For Diabetes In India

NEW DELHI: Three out of five doctors say that 'unruly lifestyle' is the major cause of India becoming the diabetic capital of the world, a survey has found. A total of 1,617 doctors responded to questions pertaining to the causes of rise in diabetic cases in India and patients reaction to the treatment modalities during a survey conducted by an app for the doctors community. 58.8 per cent doctors have attributed this to the lifestyle prevalent in modern and competitive India. Interestingly, family history was considered as a contributing factor by only 7.2 per cent of the doctors, said Mudit Vijayvergiya, co-founder of an app. The findings of the survey were released on the eve of the World Health Day 2016, theme for which is "Beat Diabetes". "Anything processed has added sugar, added salt, and added maida for that matter even Ramdev's biscuits are processed and not up to the mark. Diabetes is a lifestyle problem, I would strongly recommend 150 minutes per week walking and eating from the farm as much as possible fresh fruits and vegetables should top the chart," said Dr Sujeet Jha Director Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity, Max Healthcare. The survey also tried to cover adherence which is perhaps the most important reason for prolongment of any disease. 41.5 per cent of the doctors said only 40-60 per cent of the patients adhere to the prescribed drug which is a cause for real concern for a large population like ours. According to the survey, 33.2 per cent of the doctors feel that 40-60 per cent of their patients check their vitals regularly and whereas 32.6 per cent of the doctors feel that only 20-40 per cent of their patients track their blood sugar regularly. Monitoring blood sugar regularly can have far reaching effects in terms of keeping this menace in check. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 definition and facts Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin produced by the pancreas lowers blood glucose. Absence or insufficient production of insulin, or an inability of the body to properly use insulin causes diabetes. The two types of diabetes are referred to as type 1 and type 2. Former names for these conditions were insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or juvenile onset and adult onset diabetes. Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include increased urine output, excessive thirst, weight loss, hunger, fatigue, skin problems slow healing wounds, yeast infections, and tingling or numbness in the feet or toes. Some of the risk factors for getting diabetes include being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of diabetes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and low levels of the "good" cholesterol (HDL) and elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood. If you think you may have prediabetes or diabetes contact a health-care professional. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose elevates (for example, after eating food Continue reading >>

Causes Of Type 2 Diabetes

Causes Of Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet It is difficult to be conclusive when identifying a cause for a long term condition such as type 2 diabetes, when a number of contributing factors may be present. Key to the development of type 2 diabetes is the body’s inability to properly respond to insulin. Researchers from around the globe have studied data and carried out experiments to try to understand what may cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes to develop. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes There are a number risk factors that are closely linked to type 2 diabetes, but research is yet to provide clear answers as to how much these factors may be a cause or otherwise an association. Type 2 diabetes risk factors include: Carrying too much excess body fat Having high blood pressure or cholesterol Having a close family member with type 2 diabetes Having previously had gestational diabetes Read more about risk factors for type 2 diabetes Diet Dietary factors are often viewed as a prominent cause of diabetes and often incorrect assumptions that it is the only factor linked to a cause are made. Research indicates that diet can play a part in type 2 diabetes but it is still one factor amongst many others that can apply and generalisations should not be drawn without the consideration of other contributing factors. Genetic Research has uncovered a number of genes which are associated with an increased risk of diabetes. There are a number of factors which can influence our blood sugar levels, including where we distribute fat on our body and how well our muscles take up glucose from the blood. Our genes help to control each process in the body and a variation in just one gene which plays a part in metabolism can increase the risk of having difficulty with controlling blood sugar later in life. To date resea Continue reading >>

Outline Of Diabetes

Outline Of Diabetes

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to diabetes: Diabetes – group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar, either because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or because cells do not respond properly to the insulin that is produced,[1] a condition called insulin resistance. The resultant high blood sugar produces the classical symptoms of polyuria (frequent urination), polydipsia (increased thirst) and polyphagia (increased hunger). What type of thing is diabetes?[edit] Diabetes can be described as a: A class of metabolic diseases A class of systemic diseases[2][3] Types of diabetes[edit] Prediabetes – Main types of diabetes: Diabetes mellitus type 1 – disease that results in autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas.[4] Diabetes mellitus type 2 – metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency.[5] Disease of affluence – type 2 diabetes is one of the "diseases of affluence", which include mostly chronic non-communicable diseases for which personal lifestyles and societal conditions associated with economic development are believed to be important risk factors. Gestational diabetes – Gestational diabetes, is a temporary condition that is first diagnosed during pregnancy. Like type 1 and type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes causes blood sugar levels to become too high.It involves an increased risk of developing diabetes for both mother and child. Other types of diabetes: Congenital diabetes – Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes – Steroid diabetes – Monogenic diabetes – Signs and symptoms of diabetes[edit] Symptoms of prediabetes – prediabetes typically has no distinct signs or s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview

Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview

Diabetes mellitus is a disease that prevents your body from properly using the energy from the food you eat. Diabetes occurs in one of the following situations: The pancreas (an organ behind your stomach) produces little insulin or no insulin at all. (Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone, produced by the beta cells of the pancreas, which helps the body use sugar for energy.) -Or- The pancreas makes insulin, but the insulin made does not work as it should. This condition is called insulin resistance. To better understand diabetes, it helps to know more about how the body uses food for energy (a process called metabolism). Your body is made up of millions of cells. To make energy, the cells need food in a very simple form. When you eat or drink, much of your food is broken down into a simple sugar called glucose. Glucose provides the energy your body needs for daily activities. The blood vessels and blood are the highways that transport sugar from where it is either taken in (the stomach) or manufactured (in the liver) to the cells where it is used (muscles) or where it is stored (fat). Sugar cannot go into the cells by itself. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, which serves as the helper, or the "key," that lets sugar into the cells for use as energy. When sugar leaves the bloodstream and enters the cells, the blood sugar level is lowered. Without insulin, or the "key," sugar cannot get into the body's cells for use as energy. This causes sugar to rise. Too much sugar in the blood is called "hyperglycemia" (high blood sugar) or diabetes. What are the types of diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2: Type 1 diabetes occurs because the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (beta cells) are damaged. In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes?

What Causes Diabetes?

Little Known Factors That Lead To Diabetes What are some of the lifestyle, genetics and other not-so-obvious factors that can trigger diabetes? What can you do to prevent this condition? Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It affects over 29.1 million people in the U.S. – 9.3 percent of the population in the U.S. Another 86 million Americans have prediabetes and aren’t even aware of it. The cause of diabetes is the absence or insufficient production of the hormone insulin, which lowers blood sugar in the body. Two types of diabetes There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2, which are also known as insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is less common: it affects only 1 in 250 Americans and only occurs in individuals younger than age 20. It has no known cure. A majority of type 2 diabetes cases can be prevented or cured. Signs and symptoms Among the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased urine Excessive thirst Weight loss Hunger Fatigue Skin problems Slow-healing wounds Yeast infections Tingling or numbness in feet or toes Various factors Research has proven that there are certain lifestyle and genetic factors that lead to diabetes. Among them are: Leading a non-active lifestyle A family history of diabetes High blood pressure (hypertension) Low levels of the good cholesterol (HDL) Elevated levels of triglycerides (a type of fat) in the blood Increasing age Polycystic ovary syndrome Impaired glucose tolerance Insulin resistance Gestational diabetes during a pregnancy Some ethnic backgrounds (African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans and Alaska natives) are at greater risk of diabetes. Get t Continue reading >>

Causes

Causes

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood glucose level, or the body is unable to use the insulin that is produced (insulin resistance). The pancreas is a large gland behind the stomach that produces the hormone insulin. Insulin moves glucose from your blood into your cells, where it's converted into energy. In type 2 diabetes, there are several reasons why the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes Three of the main risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes are: age – being over the age of 40 (over 25 for people of south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or black African origin, even if you were born in the UK) genetics – having a close relative with the condition, such as a parent, brother or sister weight – being overweight or obese People of south Asian and African-Caribbean origin also have an increased risk of developing complications of diabetes, such as heart disease, at a younger age than the rest of the population. Read about reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes. Age Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases with age. This may be because people tend to gain weight and exercise less as they get older. Maintaining a healthy weight by eating a healthy, balanced diet and exercising regularly are ways of preventing and managing diabetes. White people over the age of 40 have an increased risk of developing the condition. People of south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean and black African origin have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes at a much earlier age. However, despite increasing age being a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, over recent years younger people from all ethnic groups have been developing the condition. It's also becoming more comm Continue reading >>

4 Hidden Causes Of Diabetes

4 Hidden Causes Of Diabetes

New thinking upends the conventional wisdom… High blood sugar (glucose) is an obvious sign of diabetes. It’s worrisome because elevated blood glucose can, over time, lead to serious diabetes-related complications, such as stroke, heart disease and eye damage. We’ve long known how diabetes develops: Cells gradually become less responsive (“resistant”) to the glucose-regulating hormone insulin…the ability of the pancreas to produce insulin flags…and glucose readings creep upward. However, it has not been clear, until recently, why people become insulin-resistant in the first place—and what they can do to stop it. Now that’s changing. NEW THINKING The conventional wisdom is that carbohydrates—particularly foods that are high in “simple” carbs, such as soft drinks, white bread and desserts—are a main driver of insulin resistance and diabetes. But other factors, some of which are largely hidden, are also important… RISK FACTOR #1: Ectopic fat. It’s clear that being overweight increases risk for diabetes. But we’re learning that a specific type of fat that accumulates in the liver and muscles is especially harmful. This ectopic fat impairs the ability of insulin to metabolize glucose and can lead to insulin resistance. Certain people—including some who aren’t overweight—have a genetic tendency to develop ectopic fat. RISK FACTOR #2: Inflammation. Persistent, low-grade inflammation—caused by air pollution, obesity, a poor diet, gum disease, etc.—causes cells to produce inflammatory molecules that increase insulin resistance. RISK FACTOR #3: Mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria, the “batteries” that fuel the body’s cells, naturally produce free radicals and other by-products. The harmful molecules are kept in check by endogenou Continue reading >>

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst and urination increased hunger fatigue blurred vision numbness or tingling in the feet or hands sores that do not heal unexplained weight loss Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can start quickly, in a matter of weeks. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly—over the course of several years—and can be so mild that you might not even notice them. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. Some people do not find out they have the disease until they have diabetes-related health problems, such as blurred vision or heart trouble. What causes type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when your immune system, the body’s system for fighting infection, attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Scientists think type 1 diabetes is caused by genes and environmental factors, such as viruses, that might trigger the disease. Studies such as TrialNet are working to pinpoint causes of type 1 diabetes and possible ways to prevent or slow the disease. What causes type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of diabetes—is caused by several factors, including lifestyle factors and genes. Overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are not physically active and are overweight or obese. Extra weight sometimes causes insulin resistance and is common in people with type 2 diabetes. The location of body fat also makes a difference. Extra belly fat is linked to insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and heart and blood vessel disease. To see if your weight puts you at risk for type 2 diabetes, check out these Body Mass Index (BMI) charts. Insulin resistance Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resista Continue reading >>

Causes Of Diabetes

Causes Of Diabetes

Tweet Diabetes causes vary depending on your genetic makeup, family history, ethnicity, health and environmental factors. There is no common diabetes cause that fits every type of diabetes. The reason there is no defined diabetes cause is because the causes of diabetes vary depending on the individual and the type. For instance; the causes of type 1 diabetes vary considerably from the causes of gestational diabetes. Similarly, the causes of type 2 diabetes are distinct from the causes of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes causes Type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune system destroying the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This causes diabetes by leaving the body without enough insulin to function normally. This is called an autoimmune reaction, or autoimmune cause, because the body is attacking itself. There is no specific diabetes causes, but the following triggers may be involved: Viral or bacterial infection Chemical toxins within food Unidentified component causing autoimmune reaction Underlying genetic disposition may also be a type 1 diabetes cause. Type 2 diabetes causes Type 2 diabetes causes are usually multifactorial - more than one diabetes cause is involved. Often, the most overwhelming factor is a family history of type 2 diabetes. This is the most likely type 2 diabetes cause. There are a variety of risk factors for type 2 diabetes, any or all of which increase the chances of developing the condition. These include: Living a sedentary lifestyle Increasing age Bad diet Other type 2 diabetes causes such as pregnancy or illness can be type 2 diabetes risk factors. Gestational diabetes causes The causes of diabetes in pregnancy also known as gestational diabetes remain unknown. However, there are a number of risk factors that increase the chances of deve Continue reading >>

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