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What Are The Long Term Effects Of Diabetes On The Body?

Long-term Effects Of Diabetes Type One

Long-term Effects Of Diabetes Type One

Diabetes, whether type 1 or type 2, can contribute to the development of several serious long-term health problems. People with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) no longer make insulin, a hormone necessary to move glucose, or sugar, from the blood into the body cells to be used or stored as energy. Insulin is necessary to sustain life, so people with T1DM require replacement insulin to manage blood sugar levels. Over time, if blood sugar levels run too high, damage to blood vessels and nerves can occur, and this can cause health problems such as heart and blood vessel disease, kidney disease, nerve damage, eye disease and an increased risk of amputation. However, if blood sugars are kept to near-normal levels, these health problems can be minimized or prevented. Video of the Day According to an October 2013 review published in “Cardiovascular Diabetology," the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in T1DM is 2 to 3 times higher in men and 3 to 5 times higher in women compared to people without diabetes. CVD, the leading cause of death in adults with T1DM, affects the large blood vessels that transport blood throughout the body, including to the heart, arms, legs and brain. Over time, high blood sugars can contribute to an impaired or blocked blood supply to the heart or brain, increasing the risk of heart attack or stroke. Poor blood flow may also lead to slower healing of wounds and serious infections in the limbs -- which in some cases may require amputation of the affected toes, feet or legs. High blood sugars contribute to the development of neuropathy, or nerve damage. An article published in the October 2008 issue of “Pharmacology & Therapeutics” reports that more than half of those with longstanding diabetes have some type of neuropathy. Diabetes peripheral ne Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Long Term Problems

Diabetes: Long Term Problems

Complications Diabetes can cause other health problems. Sometimes these problems are referred to as complications (COM-pli-KAY-shuns). Long-term problems may develop when you have diabetes for a long time, especially when diabetes is not in good control. You can reduce your chances of developing long term problems when you keep your blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels in a good range. In case of emergency, you should always wear a form of medical identification (ID). Examples are ID bracelets and necklaces. To reduce your risk of getting other health problems from diabetes, you need good control of your blood glucose (sugar). Good control means keeping blood glucose at certain levels. To learn more about good control and healthy blood glucose numbers, see the UPMC patient education sheet Diabetes: Your Management Plan. This patient education sheet tells you about long-term problems, what to do for them, and how to prevent them. High blood glucose over a long time can lead to: Kidney damage Eye damage Nerve damage Hardening of the arteries Kidney Problems The name for kidney damage is nephropathy (nef-RAW-pith-ee). High blood glucose can damage the blood vessels in the kidneys. The damaged blood vessels cannot filter all the waste products from your blood. So some waste remains in your blood. And protein that should stay in your body leaks into the urine and leaves your body. If kidney damage continues, in time your kidneys will fail to work at all. If this happens, you will need to have dialysis (dye-AL-ih-sis). Dialysis is a process that removes the waste products from your blood. Some people may need to have a kidney transplant. Good control of blood glucose helps reduce your chance of getting kidney disease. To see if you have early kidney disease, y Continue reading >>

Long-term Complications Of Diabetes

Long-term Complications Of Diabetes

It is important to keep your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol in a healthy range. You should learn these basic steps for managing diabetes and staying as healthy as possible. Steps may include: A healthy diet Exercise Medicines You may need to check your blood sugar daily or more often. Your health care provider will also help you by ordering blood tests and other tests. All these may help you keep complications of diabetes away. You will need to check your blood sugar level at home. You will use a special device called a glucose meter to test your blood sugar. Your provider will let you know if you need to check it every day and how many times each day. Your provider will also tell you what blood sugar numbers you are trying to achieve. This is called managing your blood sugar. These goals will be set for different times during the day. To prevent heart disease and stroke, you may be asked to take medicine and change your diet and activity: Your provider may ask you to take a medicine called an ACE inhibitor or a different medicine called an ARB, for high blood pressure or kidney problems. Your provider may ask you to take a medicine called a statin to keep your cholesterol down. Your provider may ask you to take aspirin to prevent heart attacks. Ask your provider if aspirin is right for you. Regular exercise is good for people with diabetes. Talk to your provider first about what exercises are best for you and how much exercise you should do every day. DO NOT smoke. Smoking makes diabetes complications worse. If you do smoke, work with your provider to find a way to quit. To keep your feet healthy, you should: Get a foot exam by your provider at least every 6 to 12 months and learn whether you have nerve damage. Make sure you are wearing the right kinds of Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

The Immediate, Short And Long-term Effects Of Sugar

The Immediate, Short And Long-term Effects Of Sugar

Craving your next sugar fix? This minute-by-minute effect timeline may make you think twice! It isn’t disputed that sugar has a negative impact on your health, leading to an array of health problems including obesity and diabetes. But do you know the immediate effect sugar is having on your body and the long-term consequences of them? ORGAN IMMEDIATE EFFECT SHORT-TERM EFFECT LONG-TERM EFFECT Eyes Someone who has been diagnosed with diabetes may notice blurred vision immediately after consuming sugar. - Eating high amounts of sugar will significantly increase your risk of developing diabetes. If you have diabetes, you are also at greater risk of developing retinopathy – a condition where the blood vessels in the retina have been damaged by having high blood glucose levels, this could eventually lead to blindness. Teeth Sugar causes an imbalanced of bacteria in the mouth, increasing your risk of gum disease, halitosis and oral thrush. Sugar causes the enamel on your teeth to lose minerals, which will begin to cause decay. Sugar can completely destroy enamel, leading to painful procedures, and extensive dental work. Skin When you eat sugar, it is processed into glucose, which increases your insulin levels. These increased insulin levels are similar to a surge of inflammation throughout the body. When sugar is consumed, enzymes are produced that breakdown collagen and elastin within the skin – leading to wrinkles and sagging. In the long-term, you are more at risk of developing a range of skin conditions, including acne and rosacea. Pancreas The main pancreatic hormones are glucagon (raises blood sugar) and insulin (lowers blood sugar). Sustaining an even blood sugar level is vital in the healthy functioning of the brain, liver and kidneys. Excessive sugar consumption Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

When you hear the word “diabetes,” your first thought is likely about high blood sugar. Blood sugar is an often-underestimated component of your health. When it’s out of whack over a long period of time, it could develop into diabetes. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, a hormone that allows your body to turn glucose (sugar) into energy. Here’s what symptoms may occur to your body when diabetes takes effect. Diabetes can be effectively managed when caught early. However, when left untreated, it can lead to potential complications that include heart disease, stroke, kidney damage, and nerve damage. Normally after you eat or drink, your body will break down sugars from your food and use them for energy in your cells. To accomplish this, your pancreas needs to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin is what facilitates the process of pulling sugar from the blood and putting it in the cells for use, or energy. If you have diabetes, your pancreas either produces too little insulin or none at all. The insulin can’t be used effectively. This allows blood glucose levels to rise while the rest of your cells are deprived of much-needed energy. This can lead to a wide variety of problems affecting nearly every major body system. The effects of diabetes on your body also depends on the type you have. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1, also called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is an immune system disorder. Your own immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, destroying your body’s ability to make insulin. With type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin to live. Most people are diagnosed as a child or young adult. Type 2 is related to insulin resistance. It used to occur i Continue reading >>

Avoiding Complications Of Diabetes

Avoiding Complications Of Diabetes

It can take work to get your diabetes under control, but the results are worth it. If you don't make the effort to get a handle on it, you could set yourself up for a host of complications. Diabetes can take a toll on nearly every organ in your body, including the: Heart and blood vessels Eyes Kidneys Nerves Gastrointestinal tract Gums and teeth Heart and Blood Vessels Heart disease and blood vessel disease are common problems for many people who don’t have their diabetes under control. You're at least twice as likely to have heart problems and strokes as people who don’t have the condition. Blood vessel damage or nerve damage may also cause foot problems that, in rare cases, can lead to amputations. People with diabetes are ten times likelier to have their toes and feet removed than those without the disease. Symptoms: You might not notice warning signs until you have a heart attack or stroke. Problems with large blood vessels in your legs can cause leg cramps, changes in skin color, and less sensation. The good news: Many studies show that controlling your diabetes can help you avoid these problems, or stop them from getting worse if you have them. Diabetes is the leading cause of new vision loss among adults ages 20 to 74 in the U.S. It can lead to eye problems, some of which can cause blindness if not treated: Glaucoma Cataracts Diabetic retinopathy, which involves the small blood vessels in your eyes Symptoms: Vision problems or sudden vision loss. The good news: Studies show that regular eye exams and timely treatment of these kinds of problems could prevent up to 90% of diabetes-related blindness. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not pe Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Long-term Effects

Diabetes - Long-term Effects

On this page: Diabetes is a condition in which there is too much glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. Over time, high blood glucose levels can damage the body's organs. Possible complications include damage to large (macrovascular) and small (microvascular) blood vessels, which can lead to heart attack, stroke, and problems with the kidneys, eyes, gums, feet and nerves. Reducing risk of diabetes complications The good news is that the risk of most diabetes-related complications can be reduced by keeping blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol levels within recommended range. Also, being a healthy weight, eating healthily, reducing alcohol intake, and not smoking will help reduce your risk. Regular check-ups and screening are important to pick up any problems early Diabetes and healthy eating If you have diabetes it’s important to include a wide variety of nutritious and healthy foods in your diet, and to avoid snacking on sugary foods. Eating healthy foods can help control your blood glucose and cholesterol levels, and your blood pressure. Enjoy a variety of foods from each food group – be sure to include foods high in fibre and low in fat, and reduce your salt intake. It’s helpful to consult with a dietitian to review your current eating plan and provide a guide about food choices and food quantities. Alcohol intake and diabetes Limit alcohol intake. If you drink alcohol, have no more than two standard drinks per day. If you are pregnant or considering pregnancy or are breastfeeding, then zero alcohol intake is recommended. Diabetes and healthy weight If you are overweight, even losing a small amount of weight, especially round the abdomen, helps lower your blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol levels. It can be daunting trying to lose weight, so Continue reading >>

Effects Of Diabetes On The Body And Organs

Effects Of Diabetes On The Body And Organs

Over time, the raised blood sugar levels that result from diabetes can cause a wide range of serious health issues. But what do these health issues involve, and how are the organs of the body affected? Can these effects be minimized? When people have diabetes, the body either does not make enough insulin or cannot use what it has effectively. As a result, the amount of sugar in the blood becomes higher than it should be. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main power source for the human body. It comes from the food people eat. The hormone insulin helps the cells of the body convert glucose into fuel. Fortunately, taking a proactive approach to this chronic disease through medical care, lifestyle changes, and medication can help limit its effects. Effect on systems and organs The effects of diabetes can be seen on systems throughout the body, including: The circulatory system Diabetes can damage large blood vessels, causing macrovascular disease. It can also damage small blood vessels, causing what is called microvascular disease. Complications from macrovascular disease include heart attack and stroke. However, macrovascular disease can be prevented by: Microvascular disease can cause eye, kidney, and nerve problems, but good control of diabetes can help prevent these complications. The cardiovascular system Excess blood sugar decreases the elasticity of blood vessels and causes them to narrow, impeding blood flow. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute say diabetes is as big a risk factor for heart disease as smoking or high cholesterol. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the risk of stroke or dying of heart disease increases by 200-400 percent for adults with diabetes. The nervous system When people have diabetes, they can develop n Continue reading >>

The Danger Of Long-term Diabetes Complications

The Danger Of Long-term Diabetes Complications

Living with diabetes brings many daily challenges and frustrations. You have to watch your blood glucose levels, pay close attention to what and when you eat, and take medications, including insulin. Added to that burden is the realization that if you dont, your health could be seriously compromised in years to come. Poorly controlled diabetes can lead over time to a number of complications. Some like heart disease , stroke and kidney disease can be life-threatening. The biggest one is cardiovascular disease, said Arch Mainous III , a diabetes researcher and chair of the department of health services research, management and policyat the University of Floridas College of Public Health and Health Professions. Unfortunately, some damage may even occur before an individual is diagnosed with diabetes. Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of people with diabetes; those with diabetes are up to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease. The problem is diabetes takes a long time to develop, and by the time somebody becomes symptomatic, theyre kind of down the road on some of these target complications, Mainous said. Because diabetes may hide in the body for years, millions at risk for the disease are not aware of it, Mainous said. In fact, a huge proportion of the American population 39 percent, or 86 million adults have prediabetes. And about 90 percent of those cases are undiagnosed, Mainous said. So theres a whole lot more people at risk for developing diabetes, [but] if you identify these people, you can keep them from progressing to diabetes. You can even reverse them back to a normal blood glucose level, he said. Complications of diabetes include these, according to the Mayo Clinic and the Cleveland Clinic: Heart disease and stroke. Heart disease is the No. 1 Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

With type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus), if you don’t work hard to keep your blood glucose level under control, there are short- and long-term complications to contend with. However, by watching the amount and types of food you eat (your meal plan), exercising, and taking any necessary medications, you may be able to prevent these complications. And even if you have some of the long-term, more serious complications discussed below when you’re first diagnosed, getting tight control of your blood glucose will help prevent the complications from becoming worse. (It is possible with type 2 diabetes to already have some of these complications when you’re first diagnosed. That’s because type 2 develops gradually, and you may not realize that you have high blood glucose for quite some time. Over time, high blood glucose can cause serious damage. You can learn more about that in this article on the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.) Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It is possible for your blood glucose to drop, especially if you’re taking insulin or a sulfonylurea drug (those make your body produce insulin throughout the day). With these medications, if you eat less than usual or were more active, your blood glucose may dip too much. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and too much alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). Rapid heartbeat Sweating Whiteness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech Mild cases of hypoglycemia can be treated by drinking orange juice or eating a glucose tablet—those will quickly rai Continue reading >>

Long-term Complications In Diabetes

Long-term Complications In Diabetes

When a person doesn't manage diabetes well, it can cause blood vessel and nerve damage. This damage happens over time, usually within 5 to 10 years, leading to long-term complications. The rate at which this damage happens is directly related to blood sugar and blood pressure levels. When blood sugar levels are higher than 140 and blood pressure levels are higher than 129/79 over several years, damage is greater and happens sooner. That's why it's so important to keep blood sugar and blood pressure levels as well controlled as possible. A person with diabetes is more likely than someone without diabetes to have: A heart attack or stroke. Vision changes, even blindness. Kidney disease. Nerve damage in the feet. Nerve damage to internal organs, including stomach, intestines, bladder, and genitals (causing sexual problems). Frequent infections and wounds that won't heal. All of these are serious problems. The chance that a person will have any of them is higher if blood sugar and blood pressure levels are uncontrolled for a long period of time. How Damage Happens Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to all parts of the body, including the heart, liver, skin, brain, muscles, and all the nerves. When blood vessels are damaged, it causes changes to these parts of the body. Having diabetes increases a person's chance of having long-term complications caused by blood vessel damage. A person with diabetes who also smokes, eats food that's high in fat, and doesn't get much exercise has an even higher chance of damaging arteries and blood vessels. The damage to blood vessels and nerves can happen in small blood vessels of the eyes, kidneys, and other organs; large blood vessels leading to the heart and brain; and nerves in the legs and feet as well as those i Continue reading >>

11 Long Term Effects Of Type 2 Diabetes In The Body Complications

11 Long Term Effects Of Type 2 Diabetes In The Body Complications

Home Disease & Disorder Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes 11 Long Term Effects of Type 2 Diabetes in the body Complications 11 Long Term Effects of Type 2 Diabetes in the body Complications Almost every person at risk for developing diabetes. The International Diabetes Federation shown that every nine minutes someone dies by diabetes. Experts define diabetes as a disease or a chronic metabolic disorder with multiple aetiologies characterized by high blood sugar levels accompanied by impaired metabolism of lipids proteins and carbohydrates as a result of insufficiency of insulin function. Generally, people with diabetes recognize the excessive blood sugar. There are several types of diabetes, but this type 2 diabetes has most of sufferers in the world. Differences between Type 2 Diabetes Compared to Type 1 Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes. Type 2 diabetes (Non-Insulin-dependent diabetes) is a type of diabetes is more common. Many sufferers compared with type 1 diabetes, especially in adults, although it is possible also attacked teenagers. Type 2 diabetes is caused by cells that were subjected to insulin fail or unable to respond to insulin normally, or so-called insulin resistance. Patients with type 2 diabetes may also arise disorders impaired insulin secretion and hepatic glucose production is excessive. But there was no destruction of Langerhans cells in autoimmune diabetes as occurs in type 1 insulin function decline in patients with type 2 diabetes are only relative, not absolute. Diabetes is generally characterized by symptoms of frequent of urination, frequent of thirst, Polyphagia (frequent of hungry), and weight loss. Other symptoms that are usually found at the time of diagnosis include a history of blurred vision, itching, peripheral Neuropathy, recurrent vaginal in Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy. Different factors, including genetics and some viruses, may contribute to type 1 diabetes. Although type 1 diabetes usually appears during childhood or adolescence, it can develop in adults. Despite active research, type 1 diabetes has no cure. Treatment focuses on managing blood sugar levels with insulin, diet and lifestyle to prevent complications. Symptoms Type 1 diabetes signs and symptoms can appear relatively suddenly and may include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Bed-wetting in children who previously didn't wet the bed during the night Extreme hunger Unintended weight loss Irritability and other mood changes Fatigue and weakness Blurred vision When to see a doctor Consult your doctor if you notice any of the above signs and symptoms in you or your child. Causes The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Usually, the body's own immune system — which normally fights harmful bacteria and viruses — mistakenly destroys the insulin-producing (islet, or islets of Langerhans) cells in the pancreas. Other possible causes include: Genetics Exposure to viruses and other environmental factors The role of insulin Once a significant number of islet cells are destroyed, you'll produce little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone that comes from a gland situated behind and below the stomach (pancreas). The pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. Insulin circulates, allowing sugar to enter your cells. Insulin lowers the amount of sugar in your bloodstream. As your blood sugar level drops, so does the secre Continue reading >>

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