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What Are The Four Different Types Of Diabetes?

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

When people hear that you have diabetes, they start to make assumptions that aren't always accurate. A lot of the confusion stems from the fact that there are two main types, yet many people don't understand how they're different. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get daily healthy living tips delivered straight to your inbox!) As someone with type 1 diabetes—I was diagnosed with it nearly 40 years ago—I'm all too familiar with the disease. I lived with it as a child, teen, and adult, and when I decided to have kids I had to figure out how to manage the condition while being pregnant. (I even wrote a book about it, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby.) Having type 1 diabetes means I'm in the minority: Of the approximately 29 million Americans who have diabetes, only 1.25 million have type 1. Most have type 2, which is a totally different form. "Comparing type 1 to type 2 is like comparing apples to tractors," says Gary Scheiner, a Pennsylvania-based certified diabetes educator and author of Think Like a Pancreas. "The only thing they really have in common is that both involve an inability to control blood sugar levels." Here are 5 important distinctions. 1. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease; type 2 isn't. Diabetes happens when your body has trouble with insulin, a hormone that helps convert sugar from the food you eat into energy. When there isn’t enough insulin in your body, sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can make you sick. People with type 1 and type 2 both face this problem, but how they arrived there is quite different. If you have type 1, you don't make any insulin at all. That's because type 1 is an autoimmune disease in which your immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-making cells in your Continue reading >>

Three Major Types Of Diabetes

Three Major Types Of Diabetes

MANILA, Philippines - In the Philippines, the incidence of diabetes has posted an alarming increase, with health experts predicting that by 2030, there will be 6.16 million Filipinos suffering from the disease. “Addressing the problem begins with extensive efforts to educate the public about diabetes — its signs and symptoms, types, causes, prevention, and management,” explains Dr. Nicky Montoya, president of MediCard, a leading Philippine HMO. He adds, “A lot of people, for example, understand diabetes simply as sugar intolerance and that if it doesn’t run in your family, you’re safe. But in fact, it comes in different types, some of which you can develop late in life.” Below are three major types of diabetes and their characteristics. • Type 1 diabetes. Previously called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and juvenile diabetes, Type 1 diabetes is known to develop most often among the young. It is an autoimmune disease that attacks the cells of the pancreas, which then produce very little insulin, or none at all. People with this condition need to use insulin injection or pump to control their sugar levels. Its symptoms include increased urination, excessive thirst, fatigue, weight fluctuations, blurred vision, and slow-healing wounds. • Type 2 diabetes. In Type 2 diabetes, the cells resist the effects of insulin. As the disease progresses, the body may eventually fail to produce enough insulin to regulate the blood sugar level. Type 2 diabetes exhibits the same symptoms as Type 1, but these typically appear during adulthood, especially as a result of obesity and physical inactivity. Because of this, prevention and treatment focus on promoting a healthy lifestyle. • Gestational diabetes. This type of diabetes occurs if the body is unable to Continue reading >>

4 Types Of Diabetes Insipidus

4 Types Of Diabetes Insipidus

When the body is unable to regulate how it handles the fluids that are within it, then diabetes insipidus will occur. The kidneys do more than just filter the blood to eliminate impurities. They also have a second job: to remove extra fluids. These extra fluids become urine and this gets stored in the bladder. When working properly, the system is self-regulating and will create less urine when more water is needed for exercise or sweat to cool off the body. It will create more when too many fluids are present. In 3 out of the 4 types of diabetes insipidus, the regulation system malfunctions and causes the kidneys to think that there is too much water in the body. Because of this, they will continually pull out fluids from the blood stream and turn it into urine. Depending on how many fluids are consumed over the course of the day, a person with diabetes insipidus may expel over 20 liters of urine over the course of 24 hours. That’s enough to fill 5 one gallon milk jugs with urine. Normally the human body creates an anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) called Vasopressin that is stored in the pituitary gland. That’s located at the base of the brain and the amount of ADH that gets released is controlled by the hypothalamus. When the body gets dehydrated, more ADH is produced to tell the kidneys to absorb more water. This creates urine concentration. When the body is hydrated, then there is less Vasopressin and this tells the kidneys to take more water out of the blood. Each type of diabetes insipidus has its own unique set of causes, symptoms, and treatments. Here is an in-depth look at this disease and what a diagnosis may mean. 1. Central Diabetes Insipidus Is the Most Common Form Central diabetes insipidus is the most common form of DI because it occurs in all population de Continue reading >>

Do You Know The 5 Types Of Diabetes?

Do You Know The 5 Types Of Diabetes?

(BlackDoctor.org) — What is diabetes? Essentially, it’s a disorder where your body has problems producing or effectively using insulin, which can, in turn, cause many other mild to severe health problems. There are several different causes of insulin problems – managing your diabetes will depend on which type you have. Type 1 Diabetes: Little To No Insulin With type 1 diabetes, which used to be called juvenile diabetes, your body does not produce insulin or produces very little. Type 1 diabetes is known as an autoimmune disease because it occurs when your immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in children and young adults and accounts for 5 to 10 percent of diabetes cases in the United States. Symptoms may include thirst, frequent urination, increased hunger, unexplained weight loss, blurry vision, and fatigue. People who have type 1 diabetes need to take insulin injections daily to make up for what their pancreas can’t produce. Type 2 Diabetes: Insulin Resistance Type 2 diabetes, which used to be called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of diabetes cases. While most people who develop type 2 diabetes are older, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children is on the rise. The exact cause of type 2 diabetes is largely unknown, but the disease tends to develop in people who are obese and physically inactive. People who have a family history of diabetes or a personal history of gestational diabetes are also at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In addition, certain groups, particularly African Americans, have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes usually develop gradually, and are similar to Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is the full medical name for diabetes, a condition where the body has a problem making insulin or using it effectively to process glucose (sugar) from food. Diabetes mellitus is a life-long condition and includes type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Glucose and diabetes mellitus All types of diabetes mellitus have something in common. Normally, your body breaks down the sugars and carbohydrates you eat into a special sugar called glucose. Glucose fuels the cells in your body, but the cells need insulin, a hormone, in your bloodstream in order to take in the glucose and use it for energy. With diabetes mellitus, either your body doesn't make enough insulin, it can't use the insulin it does produce, or a combination of both. Since the cells can't take in the glucose, it builds up in your blood. High levels of blood glucose can damage the tiny blood vessels in your kidneys, heart, eyes and nervous system. That's why diabetes - especially if left untreated - can eventually cause heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness and damage to nerves in the feet. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. It used to be called insulin-dependent diabetes, and is caused by the body attacking its own pancreas with antibodies. In people with type 1 diabetes, the damaged pancreas doesn't make insulin. This type of diabetes may be caused by a genetic predisposition. It could also be the result of faulty beta cells in the pancreas that normally produce insulin. A number of medical risks are associated with type 1 diabetes. Many of them stem from damage to the tiny blood vessels in your eyes (called diabetic retinopathy), nerves ( diabetic neuropathy), and kidneys ( diabetic nephropathy). In addition, there is the increased risk of heart disease and s Continue reading >>

The Four Types Of Diabetes

The Four Types Of Diabetes

There are many misconceptions about diabetes on the internet. The most common is there is only type 1 and type 2. It is important to note that there are actually four types of diabetes. Diabetes is a group of diseases that result in too much sugar (glucose) in the blood stream. While glucose is critical to the body for energy, insulin is necessary to break down glucose so it can enter the body’s cells. The most common types of diabetes are; type 1, type 2, pre-diabetes, and gestational. Type 1 diabetics do not produce any insulin. They must inject insulin via syringe, pen or pump. Blood sugar testing is critical to controlling type 1 diabetes as glucose levels can rapidly change. Carbohydrates cause an increase in blood glucose, and that rise must be counteracted with insulin. These diabetics inject insulin multiple times a day. With insulin injections, and monitoring blood sugar, one can help control their type 1 diabetes. Currently, there is no cure for type 1 diabetes. The most common form of diabetes is type 2. Type 2 is most often diagnosed after the age of 45, and is sometimes called adult onset diabetes. Type 2 diabetics can produce insulin, but do not use it efficiently. These diabetics can sometimes control their diabetes by diet and exercise, but not always. Some type 2 diabetics need medicine to control their blood glucose levels despite their change in lifestyle. Pre-diabetes is a condition where blood glucose levels are high but not high enough to be diagnosed as type 2. With weight loss, life style changes, and medicine, one can control their blood glucose levels and prevent type 2 diagnosis. Lastly, Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. Like the other forms of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how the body uses Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes

Types Of Diabetes

There are other types of diabetes, though they occur less frequently. Here are the main types. Diabetes resulting from specific disease Diabetes can occur in individuals suffering or having suffered from certain disease or health conditions, such as: Pancreatic diseases (cystic fibrosis, cancer, pancreatitis, pancreatectomy, etc.) Endocrine diseases (Cushing syndrome, acromegaly, hyperthyroid, etc.) Genetic syndromes (Down syndrome, Friedreich ataxia, Turner syndrome, etc.) Viral infections (congenial rubella, cytomegalovirus, etc.) Diabetes resulting from medication Certain drugs can trigger the onset of diabetes, either temporarily or permanently. Here are the main ones: Glucocorticoids, such as cortisone Drugs prescribed for a cancer or to stop an organ-transplant rejection Drugs for hypothyroid Certain drugs used to treat high cholesterol (statins) Drugs to treat epilepsy Drugs used to treat certain mental health problems MODY and LADA diabetes Some people have a form of diabetes that cannot be classified as either type 1 or type 2. These are rare cases where a diagnosis is difficult or questionable due to an unexpected or atypical development of the disease. MODY (Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young) MODY is a rare form of diabetes that generally occurs before the age of 25 in individuals of normal weight. Although many of the characteristics are similar to type 1 diabetes, this diabetes more closely resembles type 2. Among others, the symptoms at the time of diagnosis are less pronounced than type 1 diabetes and there is no acidosis present. This diabetes is characterized by abnormal insulin secretion due to a genetic mutation. This condition is highly hereditary; the chances of transmission to a child are 50% if either parent carries the genetic defect. MODY is Continue reading >>

Other Types Of Diabetes

Other Types Of Diabetes

In addition to Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes, there are a range of other types, which are just as important. If you add up everyone with the rarer types of diabetes together that’s quite a lot of people. Unfortunately, many of these people are misdiagnosed leading to delays in getting the right treatment. We’re proud of the research we have supported to ensure better diagnosis and treatments for all types of diabetes, and it’s taught us a lot about the condition. Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) MODY is a rare form of diabetes which is different from both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and runs strongly in families. MODY is caused by a mutation (or change) in a single gene. If a parent has this gene mutation, any child they have, has a 50 per cent chance of inheriting it from them. If a child does inherit the mutation they will generally go on to develop MODY before they’re 25, whatever their weight, lifestyle, ethnic group etc. Neonatal diabetes Neonatal diabetes is a form of diabetes that is diagnosed under the age of six months. It’s a different type of diabetes than the more common Type 1 diabetes as it’s not an autoimmune condition (where the body has destroyed its insulin producing cells). Wolfram Syndrome Wolfram Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder which is also known as DIDMOAD syndrome after its four most common features (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness). Alström Syndrome Alström Syndrome is a rare genetically inherited syndrome which has a number of common features. Save for later Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes

Types Of Diabetes

Elevated blood sugar has many causes. Diabetes is classified by type, based on causes. Knowing what type of diabetes you have will help you manage it. Diabetes is defined as an elevated blood sugar, but there are many causes of an elevated blood sugar. Diabetes is classified into different types, based on the various causes. The treatment will vary, depending on what is causing the problem. It is important to know what type of diabetes you have because your type of diabetes might need to be managed differently from someone else’s. This section will help you learn about what kind of diabetes you have. In this section, you will learn about: Type 1 Diabetes: when the body loses the ability to make insulin or can only make a very small amount of insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually caused by an autoimmune process, and your body’s immune system mistakenly destroys the insulin-producing cells. About 10% of individuals with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes: caused by a dual defect of resistance to the action of insulin combined with an inability to make enough insulin to overcome the resistance. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and represents 80% to 90% of diabetes worldwide. Other Types of Diabetes: a miscellaneous category that includes unusual or rare inherited or acquired causes of diabetes. This represents the minority of people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Type 2 Diabetes Do You Have?

What Kind Of Type 2 Diabetes Do You Have?

Diabetes called “Type 2” may actually be four different types, according to functional medicine. Functional medicine practitioner Brian Mowll described the four types in a recent webinar. Although his doctorate is in chiropractic, not medicine, Dr. Mowll is certified by The Institute for Functional Medicine, an international medical group you can learn more about at this website, and he is also a certified diabetes educator. Here’s what he had to say: Type O is the classic Type 2, about 50% to 60% of all diagnosed cases. Type Os are heavy, with rounded bellies. They are highly insulin resistant. They also produce a lot of insulin and have high insulin levels until late in the disease. Type I is often seen as “thin” Type 2. People with subtype I may be underweight and have low insulin levels. They have high blood sugars and may be diagnosed with LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes of adults), but are usually called Type 2. Subtype H stands for hormonal. People with subtype H often have low thyroid and worn out adrenal glands. They are usually a little overweight or of normal weight; their bodies get inflamed easily, and they may or may not have insulin resistance. Subtype S stands for stress-induced. It can be caused by long-term chronic stress or one dramatic, high-stress, traumatic episode. People with subtype S have high levels of the stress hormones cortisol and adrenaline in the body. These hormones raise blood sugar levels. Dr. Mowll says it is possible to have more than one of these types. In fact, most people probably do. What difference does it make? Dr. Mowll and his colleague Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, agree that different subtypes need different diets. Type Os definitely benefit from low-carbohydrate (carb) eating and should av Continue reading >>

About Diabetes

About Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) disease that affects how your body turns food into energy. Most of the food you eat is broken down into sugar (also called glucose) and released into your bloodstream. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin, which acts like a key to let the blood sugar into your body’s cells for use as energy. If you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin it makes as well as it should. When there isn’t enough insulin or cells stop responding to insulin, too much blood sugar stays in your bloodstream, which over time can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, vision loss, and kidney disease. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but healthy lifestyle habits, taking medicine as needed, getting diabetes self-management education, and keeping appointments with your health care team can greatly reduce its impact on your life. 30.3 million US adults have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US. Diabetes is the No. 1 cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations, and adult-onset blindness. In the last 20 years, the number of adults diagnosed with diabetes has more than tripled as the American population has aged and become more overweight or obese. Types of Diabetes There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant). Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake) that stops your body from making insulin. About 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often develop quickly. It’s usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. If you have type 1 diabetes, you’ll need t Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy. Sometimes people call diabetes “a touch of sugar” or “borderline diabetes.” These terms suggest that someone doesn’t really have diabetes or has a less serious case, but every case of diabetes is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. Your immune system attacks and destroys the cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, although it can appear at any age. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin every day to stay alive. Type 2 diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin well. You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, this type of diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes develops in some women when they are pregnant. Most of the time, this type of diabetes goes away after the baby is born. However, if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you have a greater chan Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes

Types Of Diabetes

Today, there are 11 million Canadians living with diabetes or prediabetes. Every three minutes, another Canadian is diagnosed. Chances are that diabetes affects you or someone you know. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic, often debilitating and sometimes fatal disease, in which the body either cannot produce insulin or cannot properly use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that controls the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Diabetes leads to high blood sugar levels, which can damage organs, blood vessels and nerves. The body needs insulin to use sugar as an energy source. What is the pancreas and what does it do? The pancreas is an organ that sits behind the stomach and releases hormones into the digestive system. In the healthy body, when blood sugar levels get too high, special cells in the pancreas (called beta cells) release insulin. Insulin is a hormone and it causes cells to take in sugar to use as energy or to store as fat. This causes blood sugar levels to go back down. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and kills the beta cells of the pancreas. No, or very little, insulin is released into the body. As a result, sugar builds up in the blood instead of being used as energy. About five to 10 per cent of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes generally develops in childhood or adolescence, but can develop in adulthood. Type 1 diabetes is always treated with insulin. Meal planning also helps with keeping blood sugar at the right levels. Type 1 diabetes also includes latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), the term used to describe the small number of people with apparent type 2 diabetes who appear to have immune-mediated loss of pancreatic beta cells. What is type 2 Continue reading >>

The Four Types Of Diabetic Neuropathy

The Four Types Of Diabetic Neuropathy

Most of us associate peripheral neuropathy with diabetes. What might be a surprise is that there are three other forms of neuropathy that are also common to diabetics. Diabetic neuropathy is the result of prolonged periods of excess glucose in the blood damaging fragile nerve fibers. Hyperglycemia also damages the walls of the many blood vessels in the body, including the capillaries that provide the blood supply that supports the nervous system. Finally, high glucose levels interfere with the ability of the nerves to send signals. Taken together, this triad of damage causes first numbness, then extreme pain, in the nerves in various areas of the body. Peripheral Neuropathy This is the most common form of neuropathy to afflict diabetics. Symptoms usually begin in the feet and legs, then move to the hands and arms. Symptoms include: Numbness Loss of pain or temperature sensation Tingling or burning Acute sensitivity to touch Sharp pains or cramps Bone and joint pain Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, beginning with the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Acute injury to the foot, including ulcerations, infections, deformities Autonomic Neuropathy The autonomic nerves are the ones that control the beating of the heart, breathing, bladder control, movement of stomach contents, movement of waste through the intestines and sexual response. These are the nerves that act without being directed by conscious thought. Symptoms include: Hypoglycemic unawareness (an inability to sense that blood glucose has dropped too low) Bladder issues (infections, retention or incontinence) Constipation or uncontrollable diarrhea, or both Gastroparesis (slowed emptying of the stomach) Difficulty swallowing Erectile dysfunction Sexual difficulties in women Increased or decreased sweating Probl Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes

Types Of Diabetes

Having diabetes means your body doesn't make enough insulin or doesn't use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone made by a gland near your stomach called the pancreas. Your body changes the food you eat into a sugar called glucose. Glucose is the fuel your body needs for all your activities, whether it’s eating, reading, walking or running. Your body uses insulin to carry glucose from your bloodstream into your cells. When you have diabetes, glucose isn't carried properly to your cells so too much stays in your bloodstream. This is called hyperglycaemia or high blood glucose. Left untreated, high blood glucose can cause a lot of damage to your body. There are four different types of diabetes: Prediabetes, also known as borderline diabetes Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Gestational diabetes Continue reading >>

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