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What Are The Foods That Can Cause Diabetes?

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 definition and facts Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin produced by the pancreas lowers blood glucose. Absence or insufficient production of insulin, or an inability of the body to properly use insulin causes diabetes. The two types of diabetes are referred to as type 1 and type 2. Former names for these conditions were insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or juvenile onset and adult onset diabetes. Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include increased urine output, excessive thirst, weight loss, hunger, fatigue, skin problems slow healing wounds, yeast infections, and tingling or numbness in the feet or toes. Some of the risk factors for getting diabetes include being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of diabetes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and low levels of the "good" cholesterol (HDL) and elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood. If you think you may have prediabetes or diabetes contact a health-care professional. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose elevates (for example, after eating food Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes can cause a range of complications during pregnancy. Fortunately, a woman can help reduce complications by following a healthful diet. What foods should women eat and what foods should they avoid if they have gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes occurs if a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin, during her pregnancy. This deficiency leads to high blood sugar. High blood sugar levels may cause problems for the woman and her baby if not managed properly. This article explains what type of diet a woman should follow during pregnancy if she has gestational diabetes. It also considers other treatment options for gestational diabetes and what complications may occur if the condition is not properly managed. Contents of this article: Understanding gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies are affected by gestational diabetes each year in the United States. This type of diabetes occurs when a woman's body cannot make enough of the hormone insulin. Insulin is made by the pancreas and helps the body's cells to use sugar from the blood as energy. When a woman is pregnant, her body will produce more hormones, and she may put on weight. Both of these changes may mean that her body's cells may not use insulin as well as they used to. This is called insulin resistance. Becoming resistant to insulin means that the body needs more of it in order to use up the sugar in the blood. Sometimes a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin to keep up. This leads to a sugar buildup in the blood, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Symptoms of gestational diabetes may include: being unusually thirsty Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas, for example, glimepiride (Amaryl) and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Meglitinides, for example, nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin) Thiazolidinediones, for example, pioglitazone (Actos) DPP-4 inhibitors, for example, sitagliptin (Januvia) and linagliptin (Tradjenta) What types of foods are recommended for a type 2 diabetes meal plan? A diabetes meal plan can follow a number of different patterns and have a variable ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The carbohydrates consumed should be low glycemic load and come primarily from vegetables. The fat and proteins consumed should primarily come from plant sources. What type of carbohydrates are recommended for a type 2 diabetic diet plan? Carbohydrates (carbs) are the primary food that raises blood sugar. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure the impact of a carbohydrate on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. The main factors that determine a food's (or meal's) glycemic load are the amount of fiber, fat, and protein it contains. The difference between glycemic index and glycemic load is that glycemic index is a standardized measurement and glycemic load accounts for a real-life portion size. For example, the glycemic index of a bowl of peas is 68 (per 100 grams) but its glycemic load is just 16 (lower the better). If you just referred to the glycemic index, you'd think peas were a bad choice, but in reality, you wouldn't eat 100 grams of peas. With a normal portion size, peas have a healthy glycemic load as well as being an excellent source of pro Continue reading >>

Foods That Cause Diabetes | Prevention

Foods That Cause Diabetes | Prevention

Today, more than 30 million Americans have diabetes. Its the underlying cause of over 79,000 deaths per yearand contributes to hundreds of thousands more, according to the American Diabetes Association . Type 2 diabetes is caused by insulin resistance, which occurs when the body cannot properly use insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar levels. There are a number of things that can cause insulin-producing cells to become exhausted and fail. Top offenders include: inactivity, obesity, smoking, consuming too much alcohol, and regularly eating high-glycemic foods that spike blood sugar, say Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health experts. But there are other, less talked about behaviors that can increase your risk of the condition. Take these five dietary habits, for example. They may seem harmless, but nixing them could lower your likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. Its great that you fit vegetables into your dietthey provide a healthy blend of nutrients, and a new study found that antioxidants found in produce could help reduce type 2 diabetes risk. However, its best not to pair starchy vegetables with other carbohydrate-rich foods. (Think: rice with sweet potatoes). While too much starch doesnt directly raise your risk of diabetes, it can contribute to weight gain and blood sugar spikes, both of which could up your risk. As with any food, moderation is key. MORE: 7 Sneaky Signs You May Develop DiabetesAnd How To Stay Healthy Many people dont consider vegetables like sweet potatoes, corn, and peas to be sources of starch, says Jenifer Bowman, RD, a dietitian at UCHealth in Fort Collins, Colorado. But if youre trying to regulate your blood sugar, you need to be aware of overall carbohydrate content. To make sure every meal is a balanced one, fill half yo Continue reading >>

Junk Food And Diabetes: Recommendations And Tips For Eating Out

Junk Food And Diabetes: Recommendations And Tips For Eating Out

Junk food and diabetes: Recommendations and tips for eating out Reviewed by Natalie Olsen, RD, LD, ACSM EP-C More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is a condition where the body is unable to make enough insulin, or to use it properly. Insulin is necessary both to regulate levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood and to use this sugar to fuel the body's cells. Healthful eating is one of the easiest and most effective ways to prevent or manage the symptoms of diabetes . However, by making smart decisions, it is possible for those with diabetes to enjoy their favorite junk foods from time to time. Diabetes-friendly options at popular chain restaurants Junk food is high in calories and sugar but low in nutrients, so should be consumed as infrequently as possible. Fast food, processed foods, and prepared snack foods all fall into the category of junk foods. They are high in calories , sugar, and fat but low in nutrients. Therefore, these types of foods should be consumed infrequently, especially when trying to manage diabetes. Junk foods may contribute to diabetes in the following ways: Rapid effect on blood sugar levels. Highly processed foods that are high in calories and low in vitamins , minerals, and fiber are digested quickly and can cause a rapid rise in blood sugar levels. Poor portion control. Junk foods are usually not very filling and frequently come in larger portion sizes than recommended. Both these factors may lead people to overeat junk foods, something that can negatively impact on diabetes - a condition where portion control is important. Weight gain. Due to its poor nutritional qualities and its ability to encourage overeating, people who eat junk food may gain we Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is an epidemic in the United States, with about 29 million people who have it, another 8 million who are undiagnosed and 86 million who are considered pre-diabetic, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes, the most common form, is a disease in which the body’s cells don’t use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to get glucose into the cells, but over time, the pancreas can’t make enough to keep blood glucose levels normal and the result is type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes increases a person’s risk for several health conditions including high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. It’s also responsible for as many as 12 percent of deaths in the U.S., three times higher than previous estimates, a January 2017 study in the journal PLOS ONE found. Although genetics can increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, both diet and exercise also play a big role. In fact, people with pre-diabetes who lost just 5 to 7 percent of their body weight reduced their risk by 54 percent, a study out of John Hopkins in July 2013 found. Here, experts weigh in with 10 foods that balance your blood sugar and can prevent diabetes: 1. Apples You might think fruit is off the menu because of its sugar content, but fruit is filled with vitamins and nutrients that can help ward off diabetes. Apples are one of the best fruits you can eat because they’re rich in quercetin, a plant pigment. Quercetin helps the body secrete insulin more efficiently and wards off insulin resistance, which occurs when the body has to make more and more insulin to help glucose enter the cells. Insulin resistance is the hallmark characteristic of type 2 diabetes. “It’s filled with antioxidants, and also there’s fiber in the fruit that nat Continue reading >>

7 Surprising Habits That Can Lead To Diabetes

7 Surprising Habits That Can Lead To Diabetes

You're cutting back on coffee iStock/Wavebreakmedia Your java habit might not be such a bad thing. Studies show that coffee consumption (both caffeinated and decaffeinated) can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. One study analysis by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that those who sipped six cups a day had a 33 percent lower risk of developing the disease compared to non-coffee drinkers. Certain components in coffee seem to reduce insulin resistance and may also boost glucose metabolism, the process of converting glucose to energy. Follow these healthy habits to prevent diabetes. You're a chronic night owl iStock/Marilyn Nieves If late night is your favorite time of day, you might be putting yourself at risk for diabetes. A recent Korean study found that people who stay up until the wee hours of the morning are more likely to develop diabetes than those who hit the sack earlier, even if they still get seven to eight hours of sleep, MensHealth.com reported. Night owls tend to be exposed to higher levels of artificial light from televisions and cell phones, a habit that is linked to lower insulin sensitivity and poorer blood sugar regulation, study author Nan Hee Kim, MD, said in a press release. Staying up late is also linked with poor sleep quality and sleep loss, which can disrupt your metabolism. Ignore these diabetes myths that could be sabotaging your health. Your diet is light on probiotics iStock/SilviaJansen "The risk of diabetes increases when you have more bad bugs [bacteria] than good bugs in your gut," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Your stomach needs good bacteria, called probiotics, for proper digestion; low levels can lead to inflammation that may eventually lead to insulin resistance. Eat f Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

en espaolSe puede prevenir la diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Glucose, which comes from the foods we eat, is the major source of energy needed to fuel the body. To use glucose, the body needs the hormone insulin . But in people withdiabetes, the body either can't make insulin or the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should. Type 1 diabetes, in which the immune system attacks the pancreas and destroys the cells that make insulin. Type 2 diabetes, in which the pancreas can still make insulin, but the body doesn't respond to it properly. In both types of diabetes, glucose can't get into the cells normally. This causes a rise in blood sugar levels , which can make someone sick if not treated. Type 1 diabetes can't be prevented. Doctors can't even tell who will get it and who won't. No one knows for sure what causes type 1 diabetes, but scientists think it has something to do with genes . But just getting the genes for diabetes isn't usually enough. In most cases, a child has to be exposed to something else like a virus to get type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes isn't contagious, so kids and teens can't catch it from another person or pass it along to friends or family members. And eating too much sugar doesn't cause type 1 diabetes, either. There's no reliable way to predict who will get type 1 diabetes, but blood tests can find early signs of it. These tests aren't done routinely, however, because doctors don't have any way to stop a child from developing the disease, even if the tests are positive. Unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes can sometimes be prevented. Excessive weight gain, obesity , and a sedentary lifestyle are all things that put a person at risk for type 2 diabetes. In the Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Can Cause Problem In Diabetes Management

7 Foods That Can Cause Problem In Diabetes Management

7 foods that can cause problem in diabetes management 7 foods that can cause problem in diabetes management Diet is an important component to maintain a good blood sugar level. Diet is an important component to maintain a good blood sugar level. If you have diabetes, it essential to stay away from foods that can cause a spike in the blood sugar or increase the risk of diabetic complications. Below we list the foods Diabetics should undoubtedly stay away from. Refined foods such as white bread, refined wheat flour, white rice etc. lead to sudden increase in blood sugar levels as they contain refined starch. Alternatively, you can go for Brown rice, Whole grains and brown bread. Dairy products like whole milk are replete with saturated fats that make things worse for diabetics and hence, should be avoided. These saturated fats also increase bad cholesterol levels and put your heart at risk. Also, add butter, full-fat curd, ghee and cheese on your list of "to-avoid" foods. Instead, go for skimmed milk, toned and double-toned milk, butter milk. Deep-fried foods such as Chips, French fries, Pakodas, Papads and the like also add to bad cholesterol levels. These starch and trans-fat rich oily foods are also the culprits behind weight gain. Obesity is said to be the primary cause of Diabetes. Instead, go for baked foods. The sugar content in fizzy drinks is too high. A regular can of Coca-Cola is found to contain around 6-7 teaspoons of sugar. Refined sugar, as explained above, not only causes an upsurge in blood sugar levels but also leads to obesity. Increased weight also increases risk of heart diseases. Fruit juices are full of fruit sugar which shoots up the blood glucose levels. Whole fruits have less sugar, fewer calories and more fibre, making them a healthier option f Continue reading >>

10 Bad Habits That Raise Your Diabetes Risk

10 Bad Habits That Raise Your Diabetes Risk

1 / 11 Bad Habits That Raise Your Diabetes Risk As you pick up your morning coffee en route to work, you contemplate a glossy iced donut in the display case. You know it’s not good for you, but you deserve a treat, right? But before you make a grab for those tempting baked goods, consider this: These seemingly harmless everyday diet decisions aren’t linked just to the obesity epidemic in the United States, but also to the worldwide rise in type 2 diabetes. It’s time to ditch some bad everyday habits — before a diabetes diagnosis forces you to. This isn’t just idle advice, either. A British study of nearly 4,000 people found that such lifestyle fixes were key to stabilizing blood sugar and reversing metabolic syndrome, a condition that leads to diabetes. So what are you waiting for? Here are some important changes you can make to trim your waistline and cut your diabetes risk. Continue reading >>

Four Food Choices That Greatly Increase Your Diabetes Risk

Four Food Choices That Greatly Increase Your Diabetes Risk

The food choices we make every day greatly influence our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The power of food was revealed in a study of more than 20,000 people from the Netherlands, published earlier this year in the European Journal of Nutrition. It showed that a diet heavy in junk food—characterized by soft drinks, fries, and chips—increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 70 percent. “Diet is of primary importance,” says Dr. Isaac Eliaz, medical director of Amitabha Medical Clinic in California, who was not involved with the study. “If someone wants to reduce their risk of getting type 2 diabetes, dietary changes have to be a part of the strategy, together with exercise and stress management.” To start eating better today, watch out for these four types of food that are known to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Learn Everything You Need to Know About Type 2 Diabetes » Highly Processed Carbohydrates Heavily processed carbohydrates, such as those made with white flour, white sugar, and white rice, are essentially whole foods stripped of important bran and fiber, as well as healthy vitamins and minerals. “Calories devoid of nutrients, with high sugar content, are the primary offenders,” says Eliaz. “As much as possible, these foods should be eliminated.” Because they are so easy to digest, these foods can cause spikes in blood sugar and insulin levels. Over time, this can lead to type 2 diabetes. According to a 2007 study in the Archives of Internal Medicine, a diet high in heavily processed carbohydrates increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 21 percent in Chinese women, compared with those who ate a diet rich in whole foods. To reduce your risk, limit your intake of foods made with processed carbohydrates, such as breads, muffins, cakes, c Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

By:Lori Brookhart-Schervish | Diabetic Living Magazine These top food offenders contain high amounts of fat, sodium, carbs, and calories that may increase your risk of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart disease, uncontrolled blood sugar, and weight gain. The good news is you can indulge in your favorite foods and still eat healthfully with our satisfying and delicious alternatives. At Diabetic Living, we believe that eating with diabetes doesn't have to mean deprivation, starvation, or bland and boring foods. However, some foods really are best left on the table or in the store. Everyone -- with diabetes or without -- would be wise to avoid or limit the foods on this list because they are high in saturated fat, sodium, calories, or carbs, or might contain trans fats. High amounts of sodium and saturated fat can lead to heart disease, while excess sugars, high carb counts, and added calories can cause unwanted weight gain and blood sugar spikes. If you see some of your favorite foods on this list, don't despair: We've picked healthier options for you to choose from that taste great. So you can have your fries and eat them, too -- provided they're baked rather than deep-fat fried. *Nutrition information cited was gathered from company websites or food packaging. You walk into a restaurant and you're feeling starved. A quick scan of the menu and there they are: nachos, one of your favorites. You order them as an appetizer and also order a meal. Unfortunately, most restaurant nacho orders equate to and often exceed an entire meal's worth of calories, carbs, and fat. For example, a regular order of Chili's Classic Nachos has 830 calories, 59 grams of fat, and 39 grams of carb. You don't need to give up nachos to eat healthfully. Make a few changes to the basic rec Continue reading >>

Foods And Drinks That Can Cause Blood Sugar Swings

Foods And Drinks That Can Cause Blood Sugar Swings

Just when you think you're making all the right food choices, your blood sugar takes a leap or dive. Foods and drinks can have an impact you might not expect, and these surprise blood-sugar changes can be harmful (potentially causing low or high levels). Here are some things you should consider: Don't let bagels betray you. Counting carbs is a way of life when you have diabetes. Bread can really rack up those carbs, but not all bread is created equal. Think there's no difference between a bagel and an English muffin? One plain English muffin has 140 calories and 27 grams of carbohydrates. A bagel that's 4½ inches in diameter serves up 294 calories and 58 grams of carbs. That's about as many calories and even more carbs than a glazed donut. "It's about portion size. Some bagels are the size of a plate," says Pamela Allweiss, MD, MPH. She's a medical officer in the division of diabetes translation at the CDC. A fruit in any other form may be twice as sweet. All fruits have sugar, but did you know that different forms of the same fruit have vastly different amounts? Dried fruit packs a sugary punch compared with its fresh counterpart. Ten grapes, which weigh about 1.75 ounces, have 34 calories and 8 grams of sugar. They're also full of water, which helps fill you up. A 1.5-ounce, single-serving box of raisins packs 129 calories and 15 grams of sugar, but none of the water. "Without the water, the sugar is more concentrated in dried fruit. And with the smaller size, you're likely to eat many more of them," Allweiss says. Fruit juices are similarly deceptive. A 5-ounce Florida orange has 65 calories, 13 grams of sugar, and 3 grams of fiber. An 8-ounce glass of juice, though, has 112 calories, 24 grams of sugar, and no fiber. Sports drinks may not be so sporty. They may have Continue reading >>

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