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What Are The Early Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes?

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13 Hidden Signs You Could Have Type-2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. While most people with type-1 diabetes are born with it, type-2 can come on at any time. With type-2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body’s cells don't react to insulin. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. If diabetes is left untreated the glucose starts to build up in the blood instead of heading straight for the cells. If the blood sugar gets too high or too low, health complications arise. Here are 13 signs that you might have type-2 diabetes: 1. EXCESSIVE THRIST Feeling constantly thirsty is one of the most common symptoms of diabetes. It's usually coupled with dryness in the mouth and can be one of the first signs to develop. 2. HUNGER A sudden increase in appetite, particularly sweet cravings, can also be a symptom of the condition. This is because of the really high or really low blood sugar levels. When your blood sugar levels dip, this sends the signal to the body that you need to eat something, which explains hunger pangs at any time of the day. 3. WEIGHT LOSS If you Continue reading >>

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  1. antiquedave

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as t

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    I know I'm a newbie but in everything I've read in the past 3 months I've come away with the conclusion that in spite of your best efforts there are aspects of the disease that will progress. You can slow it down but you can't stop it entirely.
    That each of us is different as to what we can tolerate for food, how we benefit from exercize, how our meds impact our D and which systems in our bodies will be impacted more severely from our D.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory?

  2. Jimmy Cowboy

    Hi Dave, I'm pretty new to this also, having been just diagnosed in March, 2009. My A1c was then 8.91, last week it's down to 5.7. Almost strictly through diet change.
    What has prompted my diet change is that I've read that if you can maintain near non-diabetic BG and A1c readings, you can significantly slow down, or ever stop the progression.
    I might also add, that I've read that even in a non-diabetic person, the pancreas starts to be less effective as you age. Same with all our other organs.
    Both of us being about the same age, mid-50s throws another angle into this equation. That being, how many of the complications that manifest due to poorly managed diabetes won't also manifest just do to aging. Almost all the diabetes complications are also age related complications.
    My Dad was also T2, starting about our age now, mid-50s. And he lived to be 82. He had some of symptoms of diabetes. High blood pressure, poor circulation etc. But still functioned rather well for another 30 years. Did the complications of diabetes get him? Or old age?
    If we live long enough, we'll die of something.
    I'm betting on the theory that by diet changes, life style changes, we can dramatically arrest the progress of diabetes to maybe even the point where it won't be an issue. Sure it will still be there, but if we treat it with the proper respect and stick to our diets and exercise, yes, we can slow the advancement, or even stop it.
    Or maybe it's wishful thinking, but I'm willing to give it my best shot!!

  3. Shanghaied Guy

    Originally Posted by antiquedave
    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory? Dave,
    There is much that we do not know.
    We know that deteriation of pancreatic function progresses in most T2's over time, but we do not know exactly why this happens. The popular theory was that your beta cells in the pancreas are "exhausted" from producing so much insulin in the in insulin resistant T2 body, but science suggests it is much more complicated than this.
    There is a school of thought which is well reflected in the Blood Sugar 101 website that believes that strictly controlling your BGs may halt the progression or at least slow it down. I am one of the people who believe that strictly controlling BGs will help and hope that it will halt the progression of my BG. After 13 years, my BGs are better than ever and I do not require exogenous insulin. There's hope.
    There are other people less optimistic than me. Some people here in DD Land report that after a period of very good control they suffered a sudden deterioration of pancreatic function. The person who you quote had such an experience. Differences in experience suggest there is a strong genetic component. My father had the D for over 40 years and his pancreatic function did not further detiorate, but he is now dying of heart disease, the number one complication from T2.
    My advice is do everything you can to control your BGs. It will reduce your chances of diabetic progression and diabetic complications. If you have a family history of heart disease, I would advise you to also read about preventing coronary artery disease.
    Be well.

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