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What Are The Best Vitamins For Diabetics To Take?

Natural Treatment Herbs, Vitamins, Minerals And Supplements That Help Lower Blood Sugar, Role Of Diet And Food, Alternative Therapy

Natural Treatment Herbs, Vitamins, Minerals And Supplements That Help Lower Blood Sugar, Role Of Diet And Food, Alternative Therapy

Diabetes Diabetes mellitus results when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain normal blood sugar levels or when cells in the body don't respond appropriately to insulin. People with type I diabetes mellitus (insulin-dependent diabetes) produce little or no insulin at all. In type II diabetes mellitus (non-insulin-dependent diabetes), the pancreas continues to manufacture insulin, sometimes even at higher than normal levels. However, the body develops resistance to its effects and the sugar in the blood does not enter the cells as well as it should resulting in higher blood sugar levels. Type II diabetes usually begins after age 30 and becomes progressively more common with age. Obesity is a risk factor for type II diabetes; 80 to 90 percent of the people with diabetes are obese. Countires where the food supply has more sugar has individuals who have higher blood sugar levels. Be physical, work out in a gym or outdoors, lift weights to improve muscle mass and strength The more you walk, the lower your risk of diabetes. Daily exercise or lots of physical activity is one of the most important ways to keep blood sugar low and even a 10 to 20 minute walk after a meal can make a difference. Sedentary adults who get a few hours of exercise each week and don't lose weight may still cut their risk of developing a pre-diabetic condition called insulin resistance syndrome. High-intensity weight training coupled with a moderate weight-loss program can help men and women with type 2 diabetes to improve their blood sugar control and also boost their muscle strength and lean body mass. The added muscle is particularly beneficial to people with diabetes because muscles are "major clearance sites" for circulating blood sugar, or glucose. People who live in neighborhoods wi Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 2

Diabetes, Type 2

What is type 2 diabetes? Also called adult-onset diabetes, type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder resulting from the body’s inability to properly use or ultimately make enough insulin, the hormone that helps regulate sugar, starches and other foods the body uses for energy. It is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of all cases. Type 2 diabetes is nearing epidemic proportions in the United States as a result of a greater prevalence of obesity and sedentary lifestyles. The upswing is also due to the increasing number of older people in the population. What are the symptoms? Many symptoms of diabetes such as excessive thirst or irritability, can seem unimportant, which is one of the reasons why the disease often goes undiagnosed. However, early detection is very important because it can reduce the odds of developing the dangerous complications of diabetes. Common symptoms include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Unusual weight loss Increased fatigue Irritability Blurry vision If high blood sugar levels are not brought under control via treatment type 2 diabetes (and type 1 diabetes as well) can lead to a number of serious complications: Eye damage: People with diabetes have a 40 percent higher than normal risk of developing glaucoma, increased pressure within the eye that can lead to vision loss. They are also 60 percent more likely than normal to develop cataracts, which cloud the lens of the eye, blocking light and blurring vision. They are also at risk of diabetic retinopathy, damage to the retina that is the leading cause of impaired vision in the United States. High blood pressure: This disorder occurs at twice the normal rate among diabetics. Heart disease: Deaths from heart disease among diabetics are two to four Continue reading >>

The Basic 6 Vitamins And Minerals For Diabetes

The Basic 6 Vitamins And Minerals For Diabetes

Research shows that many people who have diabetes can benefit from taking certain vitamin and mineral supplements, especially senior citizens as well as those who don’t eat lots of vegetables, fish, and meat or have abnormal blood glucose or weight. Here are some important ones to consider.Save Multivitamin-mineral supplements Unfortunately, the people who have the worst diet are the least likely to take these supplements. And people with diabetes who take a multivitamin-mineral capsule every day often don’t give much thought to their vitamin and mineral needs. If you are taking a multivitamin, make sure that it doesn’t interact or interfere with another supplement or even a prescription. Besides keeping our bones healthy, studies have shown that vitamin D has many vital functions. And for people with diabetes, it plays a crucial role in controlling glucose levels. Senior citizens, who can’t make vitamin D efficiently from the sun, as well as overweight people, who carry excess body fat that prevents it from getting into the blood, may have even more of a reason to supplement it. Vitamin B12 Up to 30 percent of the people who take metformin may have low vitamin B12 levels. Vitamin B12 can also lessen the pain of neuropathy, one of the most common complications of diabetes. Like people with diabetes, vegetarians and vegans may also be at risk for B12 deficiency because it’s found mostly in animal foods and dairy products. And for senior citizens, low vitamin B12 levels may cause memory loss. Thiamin (Vitamin B1) Compared to people who don’t have diabetes, those with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes are more likely to have lower blood levels of thiamin, along with a higher risk of thiamin deficiency, according to the U.S. Office of Dietary Supplements. Another study Continue reading >>

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

A slew of supplements on the market claim to help reduce blood sugar levels and cut the risk of heart attack for people with diabetes. Garlic, magnesium and coenzyme Q10 are among the most common that people try. But it may surprise you to know that an old favorite — cinnamon — is getting more attention. While results are still unclear, there have been some small studies about cinnamon and blood sugar that show promising results. However, to date, there isn’t strong enough evidence to recommend cinnamon to people with diabetes for medicinal purposes. Here’s what we know Cinnamon, a spice made from tree bark, is often touted for its potential medicinal properties. People have tried cinnamon to reduce inflammation, lower cholesterol and fight bacteria. For more than a decade, researchers have been working to understand if it can help people with diabetes. Numerous studies have looked at this issue, and some have found no benefit at all from cinnamon. Other small studies have found that cinnamon can lower levels of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides (fat in the blood). Here’s a sampling of small studies that show a potential benefit for taking cinnamon: 2003 study In a small study in Diabetes Care, 30 people with type 2 diabetes were split into three groups taking 1 gram, 3 grams or 6 grams of cinnamon supplements daily. Thirty other people took a placebo. After 40 days, everyone taking cinnamon had lower glucose, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol and total cholesterol levels. The placebo group saw no change. 2012 study A more recent study in Nutrition Research analyzed 69 patients in China with type 2 diabetes. One group took 120 milligrams of cinnamon daily, another 360 milligrams and a third a placebo. After three months Continue reading >>

Vitamin Supplements For People With Diabetes

Vitamin Supplements For People With Diabetes

Do people with diabetes need vitamin supplements? And if they do, which ones should they consider taking? Eating balanced meals and snacks is important for staying healthy and maintaining good glycemic control, emphasizes Nora Saul, M.S, R.D., L.D.N., C.D.E, a patient educator with the Joslin Clinic. Choosing whole foods over supplements is advantageous since foods provide a myriad of different nutrients for health in one package, whereas single vitamin supplements are single purpose. For example, raspberries contain vitamin C, fiber and antioxidants, Saul points out. In fact, the use of supplements is usually not supported unless a deficiency state is suspected. Well controlled diabetes does not increase the need for supplementary vitamins and minerals. So who could benefit from a vitamin supplement? Those on low calorie diets, who do not eat a variety of foods Those following vegan diets Pregnant women Those whose medical conditions require a restricted diet, such as people with certain food allergies, kidney disease or diseases of the gastrointestinal tract that interfere with nutrient digestion or absorption. One vitamin that many people, including those with diabetes, may need supplementation of is vitamin D, Saul emphasizes. Although the current government recommendation is 400 IUs recent research has indicated that this may not be enough. In addition to being important for maintaining healthy bones, vitamin D may play an important role in blood glucose (sugar) control. We get vitamin D both from foods and the sun. Unfortunately, there are few dietary sources of vitamin D and for those of us in the Northern latitudes; the winter sun is not strong enough to allow our bodies to manufacture the amount we need. For many of us taking a supplement with 800 to 1000 IU pe Continue reading >>

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS In rodents, semaglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures. It is unknown whether Ozempic® causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans as human relevance of semaglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined. Ozempic® is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of Ozempic® and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (e.g. a mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Ozempic®. Ozempic® is not recommended as a first-line therapy for patients who have inadequate glycemic control on diet and exercise because of the uncertain relevance of rodent C-cell tumor findings to humans. Ozempic® has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. Consider other antidiabetic therapies in patients with a history of pancreatitis. Ozempic® is not a substitute for insulin. Ozempic® is not indicated for use in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or for the treatment of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. Pancreatitis: Acute and chronic pancreatitis have been reported in clinical studies. Observe patients carefully for signs and symptoms of pancreatitis (persistent severe abdominal pain, sometimes radiating to the back with or without vomiting). If pancreatitis is suspected, discontinue Ozempic® promptly and if pancreatitis is confirmed, do not restart. Diabetic Ret Continue reading >>

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Question: Answer: Many different supplements may help lower or control blood sugar in people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes who experience hyperglycemia (when blood glucose rises higher than normal). These supplements are discussed below. More details about each, including dosage, drug interactions, potential side effects, and ConsumerLab.com's reviews of products on the market, can be found by clicking on the links. Due to the seriousness of hyperglycemia, it is important to consult with your physician regarding use of these supplements. Cinnamon supplements may modestly improve blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not well controlled with medication. In addition, one small study found that a branded cinnamon extract reduced fasting blood sugar by an average of about 10 mg/dL in prediabetic men and women with metabolic syndrome. Keep in mind, however, that only certain varieties of cinnamon have been shown to have this effect, and long-term safety studies have not been conducted. Curcumin (from turmeric) may improve blood sugar levels, according to preliminary studies, and one study found curcumin to dramatically lower the chances of prediabetes in middle-aged, slightly overweight men and women with somewhat higher than normal blood sugar levels. Alpha lipoic acid may improve insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes, although it may only slightly reduce levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Chromium picolinate may help some people with type 2 diabetes decrease fasting blood glucose levels as well as levels of insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). However, be aware that high doses may worsen insulin sensitivity in healthy people who are not obese or diabetic. Having adequate blood levels of vi Continue reading >>

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

Should I take supplements? From cinnamon and magnesium to herbal formulas claiming to smack down high blood sugar, “diabetes-friendly” supplements are popping up in health food stores and drugstores and in the medicine cabinets of more and more people with diabetes. More than 50 percent of people with diabetes say they’ve used dietary supplements, according to one 2011 study—and at least one in four has given herbal remedies a try. The big question: Should you? “People with diabetes may be looking for something that seems less potent than a medication or something that will treat other health issues beyond blood sugar control, such as high cholesterol,” notes Laura Shane-McWhorter, PharmD, a University of Utah professor of pharmacotherapy and author of The American Diabetes Association Guide to Herbs & Nutritional Supplements: What You Need to Know from Aloe to Zinc. But experts are reluctant to recommend supplements to people with diabetes for two important health reasons. First, there’s virtually no research on long-term safety. Second, no supplement controls blood sugar as effectively as diabetes drugs (in combination with a healthy lifestyle). “There are no miracle treatments for diabetes,” Shane-McWhorter says. “The most important thing to know if you have diabetes is that no supplement will take care of it for you. Diabetes is a condition that can be well-controlled with a healthy lifestyle plus medication if needed. A supplement can’t replace those.” And new science is changing the supplement landscape. In consulting the latest research as well as supplement experts for this report on the best-studied and most widely used supplements, we found that some popular pills—chromium, we’re talking about you—aren’t living up to their reput Continue reading >>

7 Vitamins That Help Control Blood Sugar

7 Vitamins That Help Control Blood Sugar

Vitamin deficiencies are quite common among diabetics. Given the importance of vitamins to cellular processes especially glucose metabolism and energy production in cells, low levels of certain vitamins may impair glucose utilization and lead to poor blood sugar control. This article identifies and discusses the vitamins that are most important to glycemic control and diabetes complications. The B vitamins are especially important to glucose metabolism. They usually serve as cofactors in cellular reactions utilizing glucose. Therefore, they have been extensively studied to determine their benefits for controlling blood sugar levels. Because the B vitamins are water soluble, they are easily excreted from the body along with urine. This is especially important for diabetics as they easily develop deficiencies of the B vitamins. Vitamin B1 or thiamine is a coenzyme in the metabolism of keto sugars. It is also important for the breakdown of pyruvic acid, a product released during glucose metabolism. Therefore, vitamin B1 can help improve how cells utilize glucose. This can lead to better control of blood sugar levels. However, available studies do not always agree on the importance of vitamin B1 supplementation for diabetics. Clinical data show that patients with Type 1 diabetes usually have low vitamin B1 levels and can, therefore, benefit from vitamin B1 supplements. On the other hand, Type 2 diabetes patients usually have normal blood levels of vitamin B1. However, one study demonstrated that although diabetics have normal levels of this vitamin, its transportation across tissues is impaired. Therefore, even normal levels of the vitamin may not be sufficient to effectively control blood glucose levels in diabetics. Vitamin B1 supplementation has been proven to prevent an Continue reading >>

Effects Of Vitamins C And D In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effects Of Vitamins C And D In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Authors Christie-David D, Girgis C, Gunton J Received 24 September 2014 Accepted for publication 26 November 2014 Checked for plagiarism Yes Peer reviewer comments 3 1Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Westmead Hospital, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, 3Westmead Millennium Institute, 4Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Scurvy and rickets are largely considered historical diseases in developed countries. However, deficiencies in vitamins C and D are re-emerging due to increased consumption of processed foods and reduced fresh foods in the Western diet, as well as to an indoor sedentary lifestyle away from sun exposure. These dietary and lifestyle factors also predispose one to diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Our understanding of the potential roles of vitamin C (an antioxidant) and vitamin D (a biologically active hormone) in disease is increasing. In this review, we present observational, interventional, and mechanistic studies that examine the potential links between vitamins C and D in reversing defects in glucose homeostasis and the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Studies suggest an association between vitamin C deficiency and diabetes. An association between vitamin D and insulin resistance has been well described; however, the role of vitamin C and D supplementation in diabetes and its prevention requires further controlled trials. Keywords: glucose homeostasis, diabetes, insulin resistance, vitamin C, vitamin D Nutrients play essential roles in health and the prevention of disease. Nutrients, including vitamins, are vital to cardiovascular health (ie, vitamin B1), nerve function (ie, vitamins B6 and B12), the production of red blood cells (ie, folate and vitamin B12), and coagulation (ie, vitamin K), among man Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Multivitamin For Diabetics?

What Is The Best Multivitamin For Diabetics?

In the United States, about one in every 11 people has diabetes. This is a sobering statistic, especially considering that out of these 29.1 million people, a quarter don’t even know they have the disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, or suspect that you may be diabetic, it’s far from the end of the world. Today, there are treatments that will benefit you greatly, lifestyle changes that ensure a normal life, and multivitamins that help restore your energy and vigor. Of these treatments you might ask, “What is the best multivitamin for diabetics?” Well, let’s discuss some of what you should look for in a diabetic multivitamin. Being overweight is the leading cause of type II diabetes in the U.S., and as a person that has struggled with their weight in the past, I know how easy it is to overeat. One of the primary treatments for managing diabetes is to strictly monitor your diet and calorie intake. Eating less is imperative for managing this condition, but that doesn’t mean that we can have to cut important diabetes-fighting vitamins from our lifestyles as well. The primary power of multivitamins for the treatment of diabetes is the fact that often times they can help supplement us from a dietary perspective when we are forced to eat less. Vitamins are needed to boost the effectiveness of your body’s enzymes by acting as coenzymes. Each vitamin provides a different boost to the way your body deals with weight loss, fatigue, or infection. B vitamins like folic acid reduce homocysteine levels and may reduce cardiovascular risk (source), so a supplement that has these types of vitamins are generally very helpful for managing the progressive nature of the disease. Vitamin C on the other hand, reduces the amounts of the damaging sugar that forms in t Continue reading >>

Vitamins And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Vitamins And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Vitamin A or Retinol The term vitamin A comprises various chemical components with a structural and functional similarity. The most active form is retinol, present in animal tissues, esterified with long chain fatty acids. Carotenes that are present in vegetable tissues are enzymatically hydrolyzed into retinal and converted to retinol in the enterocyte. Some xanthines are also converted into retinol. Vitamin A participates in multiple metabolic processes such as genetic expression, cellular differentiation and growth, having a very important role in the immune system, fetal development, sight, taste, hearing, appetite and spermatogenesis. Retinoids have a very important function as antioxidants, thus helping to maintain the organism’s homeostasis when subjected to various forms of stress [2]. It has also been postulated that retinoids may be involved in hepatic lipid metabolism, adipogenesis as well as pancreatic β-cell function. While retinol binding protein (RBP), a protein that transports retinoids has an important effect on insulin sensitivity, acting as an adipokine [2]. A mouse model that lacks the gene for retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1, (Raldh1a1), that participates in the generation of retinoic acid to be utilized in lipid metabolism, shows better lipid profiles than mice with adequate Raldh1a1 production [3]. Even though further research is needed to identify the precise mechanisms by which retinoids and their pathways effect carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in health and disease, it is clear that adequate vitamin A intake, concentrations reserves should be maintained in the normal healthy individual and particularly in those subjects with chronic diseases that involve carbohydrates and lipids. Very old age type 2 diabetic patients have lower plasma Continue reading >>

5 Best Diets For Diabetics To Improve Your Health

5 Best Diets For Diabetics To Improve Your Health

It is vital for you to observe what you are eating when you have been diagnosed with diabetes. A diabetic person is someone who has too much glucose in their blood. Such individuals need to learn how they can manage their conditions prevent further health complications that can be caused by high level of glucose in the blood. Similarly, it is crucial for you to know the best diets for diabetics as it will play a very significant role as you manage your diabetes. Starch Starches are one of the most important diets for people with diabetes. Starch are the best source for production of energy for your body. When you take starch, and they are digested, they break down forming glucose in the bloodstream. Insulin then moves the glucose out of the bloodstream, and it is used to produce energy that you need in the body. Taking carbohydrates throughout the day will enable you to manage your diabetes, weight as well as appetite. You need to take starches in every meal of the day such as cereals, grains, noodles, cassava, yams, pasta, corns, and potatoes. These foods provide vitamins, carbohydrates, fiber, and minerals. Taking whole grain starches are very important because they contain more minerals, fiber, and vitamins. For those of you who are taking insulin or other diabetes medication, you need to take starch in every meal to keep your blood glucose balanced. Fats Taking fats will not directly affect the level of your blood glucose. However, you need to know that too many fats will contribute to gaining weight. This will make it more difficult for you to manage your diabetes. The best diet for diabetics should be one which contains high unsaturated fats. This is because the type of fats that people with diabetes need to have low cholesterol level. The best fat diet for people Continue reading >>

Key Findings: Lack Of Vitamins Containing Folic Acid And Diabetes-associated Birth Defects

Key Findings: Lack Of Vitamins Containing Folic Acid And Diabetes-associated Birth Defects

Recently, the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology published a CDC study: “Lack of Periconceptional Vitamins or Supplements That Contain Folic Acid and Diabetes Mellitus-Associated Birth Defects”. You can read the abstract of the article here. The findings from this article are summarized in the following text. Main study findings Results from this study suggested that babies born to mothers with preexisting diabetes who did not take a vitamin containing folic acid might be at increased risk for birth defects compared with babies born to mothers with preexisting diabetes who did take a vitamin containing folic acid before and during early pregnancy. However, the interpretation was limited by the relatively small number of mothers who had preexisting diabetes and did not use vitamins or supplements that contained folic acid and the lack of information on the level of diabetes control among these women. Diabetes—A disease that affects the body’s blood sugar Diabetes is a condition in which the body cannot use the sugars and starches (carbohydrates) it takes in as food to make energy. The body either makes no insulin or too little insulin or cannot use the insulin it makes to change those sugars and starches into energy. As a result, extra sugar builds up in the blood. Poor control of diabetes during pregnancy increases the chances for having a baby with a birth defect1-3 and can result in other problems for the baby. It also can cause serious complications for the mother. More than 60% of women with preexisting diabetes have unplanned pregnancies, lack access to prenatal care, or might have trouble keeping their blood sugar under control, or a combination thereof.4-6 For these reasons, it is important to understand if other actions taken before and during Continue reading >>

Daily Pill That Could Reverse Diabetes Brings Hope To Millions Of Sufferers

Daily Pill That Could Reverse Diabetes Brings Hope To Millions Of Sufferers

More than 2.5million Britons suffer from Type 2 diabetes A pill to treat or even prevent type 2 diabetes could soon be developed, according to scientists. A study on diabetic mice found a compound, produced naturally by the body, successfully restored their normal blood sugar metabolism. Researchers believe this could lead to people taking the compound like a daily vitamin to stop the condition from developing. The findings have huge implications for the UK where there are at least 2.5million Britons who suffer from the disease. The compound, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), plays a vital role in the way cells use energy. Scientists in the US were able to normalise blood sugar levels in diabetic mice by injecting them with the chemical. At the same time the jabs lowered raised levels of cholesterol and triglyceride blood fats. The researchers are now working on a way of administering NMN to mice in drinking water. 'Once we can get a grade of NMN that humans can take, we would really like to launch a pilot human study,' said study leader Dr Shin-ichiro Imai, from Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis. RISK FACTORS If you have two or more of the following, see your GP for a simple blood test... A waist measurement of 31.5in (80cm) or more for women; 37in (94cm) or more for men. Having a close family member, ie parent or sibling, with Type 2 diabetes. For many, the first signs of diabetes are symptoms caused by complications. So also watch out for the following... Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, is linked to an unhealthy lifestyle. The U.S. scientists triggered the condition in young, healthy mice by feeding them a high-fat diet. All had reduced levels of a molecule called NAD that harvests energy from nutrients and turns it into a fo Continue reading >>

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