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What Are The Best Foods For Type 1 Diabetics?

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Cut out bread. No sugar in your coffee. Only one potato at dinner. If you’ve got blood sugar problems then you’ve heard those instructions over and over. The focus is always on what you should remove from your diet, and it’s incredibly frustrating. What about what you can eat? What about the foods you should be adding to a diet for type 2 diabetes… the foods that can actually improve blood sugar control? Research shows there are many natural foods that can help. Either by reducing sugar absorption into the bloodstream, or by improving insulin resistance. It’s certainly worth your while to learn what those foods are, rather than just what to avoid. I’ve done some of the research here and strongly recommend you start with the following. 1. Almonds improve glucose metabolism Tree nuts – not peanuts, which grow in the ground – are linked with many metabolic health benefits. But almonds really standout when it comes to managing blood sugar. They are very low in carbohydrates, but that’s not why. The reason is Magnesium. Magnesium is an essential mineral involved in over 300 bodily processes, including blood pressure regulation and blood sugar control (1, 2). Alongside spinach, almonds and cashews are among the best sources of magnesium in the human diet. Several handfuls provides over 20% of the daily recommended intake (2). While the mechanism is unclear, having low magnesium levels is strongly associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It appears to impact on insulin secretion, which may be the reason that 25-38% of type 2 diabetics have low magnesium (4). Clinical trials have shown that restoring low magnesium significantly improves insulin response and reduces blood sugar levels (4, 5). Especially if you’re magnesium deficient and insulin resist Continue reading >>

Apple Picks 13 Apps For People With Diabetes

Apple Picks 13 Apps For People With Diabetes

Apple periodically updates its app store with lists of apps for particular groups of people. Even as the new iOS 8, with a built in Health app, goes into beta, Apple has added a new list: "Apple's Apps for Diabetics." According to the CDC's 2011 fact sheet, diabetes affects 25.8 million people, or 8.3 percent of the US population. The apps on Apple's list aren't all from the US, and they don't all target diabetes specifically. While many are tracking and management apps for blood glucose and insulin levels, others are more general purpose apps for eating specific diets, which people with diabetes could benefit from. The list includes mostly consumer-facing apps but one app for doctors, as well as one for kids and one for pregnant women with diabetes. The list has some overlap with the list of top-grossing diabetes apps Research2Guidance released in March, but app developer Azumio, which Research2Guidance identified as the market leader, has no apps on Apple's list. Read on for 13 apps Apple has highlighted for its users with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Diabetik by UglyApps (free) This British-made diabetes app raised $11,600 on Kickstarter in February 2013. It's a free app for diabetes management that focuses on quick data entry and aesthetically designed interactive charts, as well as reminders that can trigger either at a particular time or in particular location. The app helps people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes monitor how much and how often they’re eating, their blood glucose levels, and whether they’ve taken their medication. Diabetes in Check by Everyday Health (free) Diabetes in Check, from the recently-IPO'd Everyday Health is a type 2 diabetes management app that features a wide range of tools. It includes diabetes coaching designed by a certified d Continue reading >>

Top 10 Foods For Diabetes And Pregnancy

Top 10 Foods For Diabetes And Pregnancy

Guest post by Regina M. Shirley RD, LDN of Serving Up Diabetes There are a lot of food lists out there: Top 10 Superfoods for Health, Top 10 Foods to fight Cancer, and many more. As someone with diabetes, there are also a lot of lists we can abide by: the low glycemic index list of foods, foods under 100 calories, low-carb foods, etc. Go ask any dietitian, and we will tell you to eat a balanced diet that contains a food item from each food group at most every meal, with healthy snacks in between. This is a general guideline, and most Americans don’t have enough hours in the day to incorporate all the right food groups into their daily eating plan. I used to be one of those, call me a bit of a hypocrite, but as much as I tell people that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, I was just a coffee girl in the morning, maybe with an English muffin thrown in there or a healthy nut bar. While planning for my pregnancy, I decided I needed to revamp my diet a bit to make sure that I would give my baby the best chance at developing strong organs in the first trimester. I did a lot of reading, and implemented what I already knew as well, and created my own “Top 10” list for baby and me. Here is a list of foods that I have incorporated in my diet that pack the most vitamins and nutrients (folic acid, iron and calcium are of most importance), and are even low on the glycemic index list (helpful for the blood sugars) so are also idea for people with diabetes in general. Eggs – 1-2 eggs per day in the form of hard boiled, scrambled, or in an egg and cheese whole-grain sandwich that I made myself. I buy the cage-free farm fresh eggs from my local farm. Many people think that whole eggs are bad for you because of the cholesterol in the yolk, and that egg whites are al Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Maintaining a healthy diet is important for type 1 diabetes management. A type 1 diabetes diet is designed to provide maximum nutrition, while also monitoring intake of carbohydrates, protein, and fat. However, there’s no single universal diabetes diet. It involves being mindful of how you eat and how your body will respond to certain foods. People with type 1 diabetes need to monitor their blood sugar levels. Without proper diet, exercise, and insulin therapy, a person with type 1 diabetes could experience health complications. Complications associated with type 1 diabetes include: high blood pressure, which increases risk for heart attack, stroke, and poor circulation kidney damage nerve damage skin sores and infections, which can cause pain and may lead to tissue death Following proper dietary guidelines can help mitigate the difficulties of type 1 diabetes and help you avoid health complications. It can also improve your overall quality of life. Just like there’s no standard treatment for type 1 diabetes, there’s no standard diet for diabetes. A nutritionist or dietitian can help you come up with meal plans and create a diet that works for you in the long term. It’s easy to reach for fast food and other processed foods when you’re short on time and money. However, these foods offer minimal nutrients and are high in fat, sugar, and salt. Planning your meals ahead of time and grocery shopping regularly can help cut down on any “emergency eating.” A well-stocked kitchen of healthy food can also cut down on unnecessary sugar, carbohydrates, sodium, and fat that can spike blood sugar. An important aspect of any diabetic diet is consistency. To maintain blood sugar levels, don’t skip meals, try to eat around the same time each day, and pay attention to foo Continue reading >>

Real Life Testimonial: Controlling Type 1 Diabetes With The Paleo Diet

Real Life Testimonial: Controlling Type 1 Diabetes With The Paleo Diet

This is part of an ongoing series of real life success stories from people all over the world who have been impacted by the Paleo lifestyle and The Paleo Solution. Read Kyp’s story below. Hello, My name is Kyp and I am a type 1 diabetic born on the 5th of May 1990 and diagnosed early August 2009. I wanted to contact you in regards to how eating a low carb paleo diet has helped me with my type 1 diabetes. I guess I’ll start from the beginning. Late 2008-August 2009. Over the course of the past nine months I had changed from a chubby 102 kilogram teenager who plays too many video games and ate too many Big Macs to several months later becoming a muscular and active (6 gym sessions per week) 92 kilogram young man. I thought that by adhering to the nutritional recommendations I was doing everything in my power to achieve an enlightened state of health. I simultaneously continued to lean out, six months later becoming a frail and disturbingly lean 70 kilogram male who looked like he needed to be sat down, force fed and watched to ensure he did not try to regurgitate what he had just swallowed. I had been losing weight at a steady pace, somewhere in the vicinity of none at all to half a kilo per week until June. Once June hit my weight began to drop at an alarming rate, anywhere from 1 to 2 and a half kilos per week. Me being me I put this down to my increased effort with my highly intensive physical labour in the mornings, eating a ‘healthy’ diet full of whole grains, milk for calcium and protein, lots of potatoes and pasta in the evenings with some red or white meat, and an increased frequency of cardio vascular exercise. I was drinking gallons of water per day which I thought was due to the amount of exercise I was doing and I had began to grow increasingly tired i Continue reading >>

Superfoods For People With Type 1?

Superfoods For People With Type 1?

We take a look at 14 foods that may help you maintain blood sugar levels. Craig Idlebrook contributed to this article. Every adult with Type 1 knows, at least basically, how to count carbs and estimate the amount of insulin needed to cover those carbs. Fewer know how to seek out the foods that may help in maintaining good blood glucose levels. We’ve done some research to compile some food news for people with Type 1 diabetes. One word of caution, however: Most of the available research on food and diabetes has been done on mice and/or is focused on Type 2 diabetes. Your Shopping Cart Should be Filled with These 10 Things The American Diabetes Association has designated 10 invaluable foods for people with diabetes, based on glycemic index score and nutritional value: 1. Beans 2. Dark-green leafy vegetables 3. Citrus fruit 4. Sweet potatoes 5. Berries 6. Tomatoes 7. Fish high in Omega-3 fatty acids 8. Whole grains 9. Nuts 10. Milk and yogurt. Protein: The Jury’s Still Out The Paleo diet is all the rage now, and protein would seem like a natural choice of something to load up on in your diet, especially since there is evidence that the glucose from protein doesn’t make it into your bloodstream to mess with your blood sugar levels. However, for a long time now, scientists have warned that there is no body of evidence that suggests people with diabetes should consume more protein than people without diabetes. That being said, there is a pair of recent studies which suggest that protein may one day be suggested as a way to help control blood glucose levels: A study published in the journal Nature found that mice with the equivalent of diabetes achieved great glucose levels with daily injections of a protein called FGF1. Meanwhile, a 2014 Tel Aviv University study found Continue reading >>

Diet For Type 1 Diabetes

Diet For Type 1 Diabetes

Tweet The dietary advice generally given to people with type 1 diabetes is not much different to the dietary advice for people without diabetes. The main issues to consider are how sharply different foods are likely to impact on your blood glucose levels and how to balance the quantity of carbohydrate with the right amount of insulin. Carbohydrate counting Carbohydrate counting plays a key role in helping to balance insulin intake with the food you eat. A number of carbohydrate counting courses are available including the DAFNE course (dose adjustment for normal eating) which is widely recommended by people who have been on it. Another carbohydrate counting resource which is quickly growing in popularity is the Carbs and Cals book which shows, in pictorial form, how many carbohydrates are in a huge variety of different meals and portion sizes. Healthy eating for type 1 diabetes Eating healthily comes highly recommended and can play a part in helping to prevent the development of complications. Eating a balanced diet, containing a variety of different vegetables, will help to provide many nutrients that the body needs. Try to include foods containing unsaturated fats such as nuts, avocados and oily fish. We recommend limiting the amount of processed foods you eat and try to include home prepared or freshly prepared food wherever possible. Read more on healthy eating for diabetes Low carb diets and type 1 diabetes Some people with type 1 diabetes may wish to adopt a reduced carbohydrate diet. Low carb diets can be helpful for people who are struggling to keep control on a carb centered diet or for those who are otherwise looking to tighten their control. One of the benefits of reducing your intake of carbohydrate is in reducing the extent of post meal high blood sugar lev Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks that need to become part of everyday life – injections, testing, treating a hypo, monitoring and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. Plus, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 1 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are fine for people with Type 1 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a very restrictive diet plan. This was because the availability of insulin was limited and the type of insulin treatment was very restrictive. As insulin treatments have been developed to be much more flexible, the days of “do's and don'ts” are long gone. The way to go nowadays is to try and fit the diabetes and insulin around the same healthy, balanced diet that is recommended for everyone, with lots of fruit and veg and some food from all the food groups. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diagnosis of diabetes, it is likely that you experienced an unquenchable thirst. It is a good idea to avoid sugary drinks and fruit juices as a way of quenching thirst. They usually put blood glucose levels up very high and very quickly – which is why they can be a useful treatment for a hypo (low blood glucose levels). Instead, drink water, Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Type 1 Diabetes

Healthy Eating For Type 1 Diabetes

Eating the right food, at the right time is important for managing type 1 diabetes. Getting the balance right can be a challenge, but alongside exercise, and insulin treatment, it is essential. Making the right food choices for a meal is not just about managing blood glucose levels for a couple of hours, healthy eating has an impact on health in the long-term for people with type 1 diabetes. It is an area where there are many myths among the facts about what you can and can't eat, but overall Diabetes UK says you should still be able to enjoy a wide variety of food. It makes sense to get to know as much as possible about good food selection, but this is not something to do on your own. As part of your diabetes care team, an appointment with a dietitian is important both when you are first diagnosed, and with check-ups as part of your treatment plan reviews. Healthy eating for type 1 diabetes Carbohydrates are a vital part of any balanced diet, but they have a special significance for people with type 1 diabetes because of the way carbs are converted into glucose in the body. There are two main categories of carbs - sugars and starchy carbohydrates. Sugars are in sweet foods, as you would expect, including sugar itself. Starchy carbohydrates are in common foods like potatoes, bread, pasta and cereals. How many carbs you need will vary from person to person, how much a person weighs, how active they are and their age. Overall, you'll probably be advised to make starchy carbs add up to a third of your food and drink intake. The rate at which the carbohydrates are turned into glucose needs to be matched with appropriate doses of insulin to stop blood glucose levels spiking too high or dropping too low. Diabetes UK recommends trying to have a routine with starchy carbohydrat Continue reading >>

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

Forget what you've been told—a diabetes diagnosis does not mean you've been sentenced to a life without carbs. Well, doughnuts may be off the list, but the right carbs can and should be part of a balanced diet for everyone, explains Anna Taylor, RD, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. In fact, for those with (type 1 or 2) diabetes, getting enough good-for-you carbs is essential for keeping blood sugar levels under control. The key is to pick carb-containing foods that are also rich in fiber and/or protein, nutrients that actually slow the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, resulting in a more gradual rise and fall of blood sugar levels. Here are Taylor's top 10 diabetes-friendly carb picks, all of which pack additional nutrients that can help prevent chronic conditions or diabetes complications down the line. Lentils and Beans gettyimages-84763023-lentils-zenshui-laurence-mouton.jpg Lentils and beans are excellent sources of protein and fiber. The 19 grams of carbs from a half cup serving of cooked lentils come with 9 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber (3 grams per serving is considered a "good" source of fiber; 5 and up is considered an "excellent" source, per FDA guidelines). One thing to note: You get the same benefits from canned beans as you do from cooked, dried beans—but you may want to rinse them first, which can eliminate more than 40% of the sodium. (Diabetes doesn't have to be your fate; Rodale's new book, The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes, shows you exactly what to eat and do to prevent the disease—and even reverse it.) Peas Black-eyed, split, and classic green peas have protein and fiber benefits similar to those of beans and lentils. One cup of green peas (before cooking) packs 8 grams of protein, 7 grams of fiber, and 21 grams of c Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Type 1 Diabetes

Healthy Eating For Type 1 Diabetes

Eating the right food, at the right time is important for managing type 1 diabetes . Getting the balance right can be a challenge, but alongside exercise , and insulin treatment, it is essential. Making the right food choices for a meal is not just about managing blood glucose levels for a couple of hours, healthy eating has an impact on health in the long-term for people with type 1 diabetes. It is an area where there are many myths among the facts about what you can and can't eat, but overall Diabetes UK says you should still be able to enjoy a wide variety of food. It makes sense to get to know as much as possible about good food selection, but this is not something to do on your own. As part of your diabetes care team, an appointment with a dietitian is important both when you are first diagnosed, and with check-ups as part of your treatment plan reviews. Carbohydrates are a vital part of any balanced diet , but they have a special significance for people with type 1 diabetes because of the way carbs are converted into glucose in the body. There are two main categories of carbs - sugars and starchy carbohydrates. Sugars are in sweet foods, as you would expect, including sugar itself. Starchy carbohydrates are in common foods like potatoes, bread, pasta and cereals. How many carbs you need will vary from person to person, how much a person weighs, how active they are and their age. Overall, you'll probably be advised to make starchy carbs add up to a third of your food and drink intake. The rate at which the carbohydrates are turned into glucose needs to be matched with appropriate doses of insulin to stop blood glucose levels spiking too high or dropping too low. Diabetes UK recommends trying to have a routine with starchy carbohydrate so around the same amount is Continue reading >>

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

Despite conventional wisdom, a diabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you have to commit to a bland and boring diet. There are loads of delicious foods that are safe and healthy to eat—you may just not know what they are yet. But that’s okay, because we’re here to help! Read on to discover the best and worst drinks, grains, proteins, and produce picks for your diet, according to top nutritionists. Once you’ve read through the list and added some things to your shopping list, click over to these 15 Cooking and Eating Tips If You Have Diabetes to find out how to transform the Eat This picks into delicious, satisfying meals. According to the American Diabetes Association, it’s important to choose the most nutritious whole grains possible. Although grains help to maintain steady blood-sugar levels and provide heart-healthy fiber, white flour-based products can’t claim the same. Because the bran, germ, and endosperm have been compromised, these foods elevate blood-sugar levels and should only be consumed on occasion. “Oats contain a type of fiber called beta-glucan, which seems to have an anti-diabetic effect,” explains Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN, author of The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook., adding,* “I advise people with diabetes to steer clear of added sugars by enjoying savory rather than sweet oatmeal.” For some tips on whipping up a delectable bowl of oats, dig into these 20 Savory Oatmeal Recipes for a Flat Belly. Though you likely assumed sugary donuts and muffins weren’t the best way to kick off your day, we bet you didn’t realize just how awful certain pastries can be. “Cinnamon rolls, for example, can contain more saturated fat and added sugars than people with diabetes should have in an entire day,” cautions Newgent. Yikes! Always turn down t Continue reading >>

15 Power Foods For Diabetics

15 Power Foods For Diabetics

Some of the best foods for diabetics include dark chocolate, avocados, fish, quinoa, spinach, tomatoes, red onions, broccoli, egg whites, beans, blueberries, oatmeal, and many more. What is Diabetes? The fact that you are reading this article likely means that you are familiar with diabetes, perhaps you even suffer from the condition yourself, but a bit of background information is always valuable. If you know someone who has diabetes or are have a lifestyle that puts you at high risk for diabetes, then this is also information that could be very beneficial for you. Diabetes, quite simply, is a classification of metabolic diseases that result in a person having high blood sugar. More than 380 million people around the world suffer from this disease, and numbers are increasing every year. The technical name of diabetes is Diabetes mellitus, but more importantly is knowing the difference between different types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes: Type 1 diabetes means that a person is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that enables cells in our fat tissue and skeletal muscles to absorb glucose (sugar) from the blood. Having too much blood sugar causes a wide range of health concerns, including increased hunger and thirst (which leads to overeating and obesity), increased urination, and even more serious health issues, such as kidney failure, heart problems, damage to your vision, and even death. Type 1 diabetes is caused by the autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that create insulin; this type represents approximately 10% of diabetes cases in the world. Type 2 diabetes: Type 2 diabetes represents the other 90% of global diabetes cases and is often referred to as “adult-onset diabetes”. Type 2 diabetes is a result of lifestyle, not a metabolic autoimmu Continue reading >>

Nutrition And Meal Planning

Nutrition And Meal Planning

Pediatric Type 1 diabetes To correct for the lack of insulin in Type 1 diabetes, families learn how to match insulin doses to the amount of food (carbohydrates) eaten at meals. Foods contain a mixture of protein, carbohydrate and fat. One hundred percent of carbohydrates (carbs) are broken down to glucose. Meals and snacks should include a variety of foods, for good nutrition. Include colorful fruits and vegetables each day. Choose whole grains to add fiber to the diet. Protein and fat A minimum amount of protein and fat end up as sugar in the blood, so additional insulin is usually not needed to cover these foods. Protein and a moderate amount of fats are important for good nutrition and a balanced diet. They can help maintain a steady level of blood glucose and play a role preventing hypoglycemia. Include protein foods with two or more meals or snacks every day. Include low fat dairy to meet calcium needs. Most dairy foods count as carbohydrates; cheese is a low-carb protein substitute. Look for reduced-fat choices to help control saturated fat. Carb counting Carbohydrate is a broad category including sugars, fiber and starches (bread, cereal and starchy vegetables like potato). Carbs are found in many food groups, such as grains, fruit, milk and sweets. Food labels Reading food labels will help you control your diabetes, and is essential to learning carb counting. Prepared foods are required to have food labels, and reference books will help you find carb contents for ones that do not, like produce, meats and restaurant foods. It is important to compare your serving size to the serving listed on the nutrition facts label for accurate carb counting. If the food contains less than 5 grams of fiber, subtract half of the fiber grams from the total carbohydrate, as only p Continue reading >>

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