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What Are Some Differences Between Type I Diabetes And Type Ii Diabetes?

Type 1 And Type 2

Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Understanding diabetes starts with knowing the different types of diabetes and their key differences. The two most common types are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin due to an overactive immune system. So people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children and young adults but can also appear in older adults. Type 2 diabetes In type 2 diabetes, your body prevents the insulin it does make from working right. Your body may make some insulin but not enough. Most people with diabetes—about 90% to 95%—have type 2. This kind of diabetes usually happens in people who are older, although even younger adults may be diagnosed with it. Type 2 diabetes also usually occurs in people who are overweight. In fact, about 8 out of 10 people with type 2 diabetes are overweight. Diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes) Some women may develop diabetes during pregnancy, which is called gestational diabetes. Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes doesn't mean a woman had diabetes before or would continue to have diabetes after giving birth. A woman should follow her health care provider's advice closely during pregnancy. Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1, Type 2 And Gestational Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1, Type 2 And Gestational Diabetes?

Diabetes: Know Your Type Diabetes SA has developed information resource called 'Diabetes: Know Your Type'. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. This means that the body's own immune system has attacked the insulin producing cells of the pancreas. The pancreas can no longer produce insulin when this occurs. Although often diagnosed in childhood or adolescence, it can occur at any age. How is it managed? Administering insulin by injections or a pump will help to manage blood glucose levels. The amount of insulin required will constantly need to be reviewed. Eating well, moving regularly and monitoring blood glucose levels are also important to stay well and manage type 1 diabetes. It's a big job! How can it be prevented? Currently type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented or cured. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the insulin being produced does not work effectively (this is called insulin resistance). Although often diagnosed in adulthood, more and more children and teens are being diagnosed. How is it managed? Eating well, focusing on carbohydrate serving sizes, monitoring blood glucose levels and staying active is important. Some people will also require medications or insulin to manage blood glucose levels. Using insulin DOES NOT mean a person with type 2 becomes a person with type 1 diabetes. How can it be prevented? In many people, type 2 diabetes can be prevented or its onset delayed with regular exercise, healthy eating, not smoking and maintaining a healthy weight. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) GDM occurs during pregnancy when the pregnancy hormones block the action of insulin. This leads to insulin resistance and high blood glucose levels. How is it managed? Eating well for pregnancy Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Recently I had a patient who informed me they were a diabetic but couldn’t remember which type. “Oh well, it’s all the same anyway isn’t it?” was his cheerful response. Sadly, he is not the first nor will he be the last to get confused about the different types. It can get a little perplexing, particularly if you aren’t all that familiar with it and your GP hands you a stack of information the size of a small hatchback talking about it. Not to mention the verbal barrage of information you get from well-intentioned friends/neighbours/family members! With that in mind, today I will simplify the process for you and briefly discuss the different types so you can easily and clearly remember them. Naturally there is considerably more information relating to both of these topics but I wanted to give you a general run-through. If you think you may be at risk or if the symptoms sound familiar it’s important you chat to you G.P at the next visit a nd they can guide you through what needs to happen. If you would like to find more information is a wonderful resource you can refer back to. See you next time, Scott Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes What is it? An auto-immune condition occurring when your immune system begins to target and destroy the insulin producing cells in your pancreas. Unlike Type 2, is not linked to our lifestyle factors. Represents around 10% of all cases of diabetes and is one of the most common chronic childhood conditions Onset is usually abrupt and the symptoms obvious Progressive condition whereby your body becomes resistant to the normal effects of insulin and/or gradually loses the ability to produce enough insulin in the pancreas. Strong correlation with modifiable lifestyle risk factors. Strong genetic and family related risk factors. Rep Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Both types of diabetes are chronic diseases that affect the way your body regulates blood sugar, or glucose. Glucose is the fuel that feeds your body’s cells, but to enter your cells it needs a key. Insulin is that key. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin. You can think of it as not having a key. People with type 2 diabetes don’t respond to insulin as well as they should and later in the disease often don’t make enough insulin. You can think of this as having a broken key. Both types of diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels. That increases the risk of diabetes complications. Both types of diabetes, if not controlled, share many similar symptoms, including: frequent urination feeling very thirsty and drinking a lot feeling very hungry feeling very fatigued blurry vision cuts or sores that don’t heal properly People with type 1 diabetes may also experience irritability and mood changes, and unintentionally lose weight. People with type 2 diabetes may also have numbness and tingling in their hands or feet. Although many of the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are similar, they present in very different ways. Many people with type 2 diabetes won’t have symptoms for many years. Then often the symptoms of type 2 diabetes develop slowly over the course of time. Some people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms at all and don’t discover their condition until complications develop. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes develop fast, typically over the course of several weeks. Type 1 diabetes, which was once known as juvenile diabetes, usually develops in childhood or adolescence. But it’s possible to get type 1 diabetes later in life. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes may have simi Continue reading >>

Do You Know The Difference Between 'type 1' And 'type 2' Diabetes?

Do You Know The Difference Between 'type 1' And 'type 2' Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes is an illness that affects around 240-thousand Kiwis... and around 100-thousand don't know they have it yet. However, the disease is not always associated with an unhealthy lifestyle. 'Knowing the difference' between type 1 and type 2 is this year's focus for World Diabetes Awareness Month... Director of Youth for Diabetes New Zealand, Ruby McGill spoke to Duncan Garner. Watch the video. Continue reading >>

Case Study: New-onset Diabetes: How To Tell The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Case Study: New-onset Diabetes: How To Tell The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

L.C., a 25-year-old white woman, presented to the Emergency Department reporting that she was in good health until ~ 3 weeks ago, when she began experiencing polyuria and polydipsia. She had had an unintentional weight loss of ~ 10 lb in the past 2 months. She denied visual disturbances, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dysuria, history of the same symptoms, and recent illness. She also denied alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use. Her medications included only oral birth control pills, and she was a competitive volleyball player. Family history was negative for diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, and autoimmune diseases. Physical exam revealed a blood pressure of 129/82 mmHg, pulse of 88 bpm, and respiration rate of 20 breaths per minute. L.C.'s weight was 62 kg, and her BMI was 21 kg/m2. She seemed healthy and aware. Her eyes, throat, and thyroid were normal, and her neck was negative for lymphadenopathy. She had a regular heart rate and rhythm, negative for murmurs, rubs, or gallops, with normal first and second heart sounds. Lungs were clear with normal respirations. Abdominal exam revealed normal breath sounds and no tenderness, guarding, or rebound. Extremities were normal, and neurological motor and sensory functioning was intact. Her fingerstick glucose on admission was 571 mg/dl, and subsequently measured serum glucose was 617 mg/dl. Testing revealed a sodium level of 133 mEq/l (normal 135–145), potassium of 4.0 mEq/l (normal 3.5–5.0), chloride of 99 mEq/l (normal 96–108), carbon dioxide of 25 mEq/l (normal 21–30), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) of 18 mg/dl (normal 7.0–20.0), and creatinine of 0.8 mg/dl (normal 0.4–10). Serum acetone was positive at 1:2. Urinalysis revealed a specific gravity of 1.010 (normal 1.005–1.300), glucose of 3+, Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

The disorder diabetes mellitus, often just referred to as diabetes, is a disorder within the metabolism of the body. Remember that the metabolism of the body is the process in which the body digests the food eaten, and how the body uses this food for energy. The majority of the food consumed by people is broken down into sugar cells called glucose. Glucose is one of the body”s blood sugars, and is the main energy source for the cells of the body. The entry of glucose into blood cells is the primary way the energy from the food we eat moves from our stomach into our cells. However, this process in controlled by the amount of insulin present. Insulin is produced in the Pancreas of the body and instructs the cells of the body on when to take in glucose. Insulin is released automatically from the brain when a person eats, and is the only hormone of the body to instruct the body to store glucose in the cells. Thus, the amount of sugar in the blood is directly controlled by the presence of insulin. If a person suffers from diabetes, they will have an abnormal amount of sugar in the blood ” “ this is called hyperglycemia. There are two kinds of diabetes a person can suffer from, each with a unique cause for having too much sugar in the blood. A person suffers from Type 1 Diabetes when the body produces no insulin at all, and suffers from Type 2 Diabetes when the cells are not responding to the signals of insulin properly. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes occurs as a result of the body having destroyed the beta cells of the pancreas. These beta cells are the cells that produce insulin, and without them the body has no means of providing insulin to itself. This is why diabetes is known as an autoimmune disease, because it has occurred after the body has destroyed a benefici Continue reading >>

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Despite sharing a name, type 1 and type 2 diabetes are quite different. Understanding the key differences in type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes is critical for research into finding a way to cure, treat and prevent diabetes, but also for caring for someone with diabetes and managing your own diabetes. How these diseases begin, how they affect the body and how they are treated are all quite different. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is the result of the human immune system mistaking the body’s beta cells, which produce insulin, for foreign cells and causing their destruction. Insulin is a protein that allows the transport of sugar into cells to provide energy. When sugar can’t get from the blood into the cells, the cells have no access to the glucose they need and cannot function correctly. The composition of our blood also gets off balance, with high blood sugar levels leading to detrimental effects on other organs of the body. Injecting synthetic insulin solves this problem because it keeps blood glucose levels in the right range and helps glucose reach our cells. What is Type 2 Diabetes? Although type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1, the causes for it aren’t fully understood. What doctors and scientists do know is that excess weight, inactivity, age and genetic makeup contribute to development of the disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but the cells in the body cannot respond to it adequately so they cannot take up glucose. Later on, especially when treatment fails, type 2 diabetes is aggravated by exhausted beta cells, decreasing their insulin production resulting in further increases in blood sugar levels. Since beta cells aren’t killed off in type 2 diabetes, at least initially, blood sugar levels often become elevated Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Type 1, Type 2 & Gestational Diabetes

The Difference Between Type 1, Type 2 & Gestational Diabetes

SCROLL FOR IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATIONS Important Safety Information have a history of breathing problems have had shingles (herpes zoster) are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. DARZALEX® may harm your unborn baby. Females who are able to become pregnant should use an effective method of birth control during treatment and for at least 3 months after your final dose of DARZALEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider about birth control methods that you can use during this time. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Your healthcare provider will decide the time between doses as well as how many treatments you will receive. Your healthcare provider will give you medicines before each dose of DARZALEX® and on the first day after each dose of DARZALEX® to help reduce the risk of infusion reactions. If you miss any appointments, call your healthcare provider as soon as possible to reschedule your appointment. Infusion reactions. Infusion reactions are common with DARZALEX® and can be severe. Your healthcare provider may temporarily stop your infusion or completely stop treatment with DARZALEX® if you have infusion reactions. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms: shortness of breath or trouble breathing dizziness or lightheadedness (hypotension) cough wheezing throat tightness runny or stuffy nose headache itching nausea vomiting chills fever Changes in blood tests. DARZALEX® can affect the results of blood tests to match your blood type. These changes can last for up to 6 months after your final dose of DARZALEX®. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to match your blood type before you st Continue reading >>

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Tweet Whilst both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood sugar levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Confused over which type of diabetes you have? It's not always clear what type of diabetes someone has, despite what many people think. For instance, the typical assumption is that people with type 2 diabetes will be overweight and not inject insulin, while people with type 1 diabetes will be, if anything, underweight. But these perceptions just aren't always true. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a healthy weight when diagnosed, and many of them are dependent on insulin. Similarly, people with type 1 diabetes will in some cases be overweight. Because both types of diabetes can be so varied and unpredictable, it's often difficult to know which type of diabetes someone has. It's not safe to assume that an overweight person with high blood glucose levels has type 2 diabetes, because the cause of their condition might in fact be attributable to type 1. In some cases, when the type of diabetes is in doubt, your health team may need to carry out specialised tests to work out which type of diabetes you have. This way, they can recommend the most appropriate treatment for your diabetes. Common differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Despite the uncertainty that often surrounds a diagnosis of diabetes, there are a few common characteristics of each diabetes type. Please note that these differences are based on generalisations - exceptions are common. For instance, the perception of type 1 diabetes isn't strictly true: many cases are diagnosed in adulthood. This table should be seen as a rough guide to the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, rather than hard and fast rules. Co Continue reading >>

Differences Between Type 1 Vs Type 2 Diabetes

Differences Between Type 1 Vs Type 2 Diabetes

What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a serious medical condition which can affect your whole body. If you are diagnosed with diabetes, it requires daily treatment and self care. In case complications develop as a result of diabetes, it may reduce the quality of your life, including your life expectancy. Although there is no cure for diabetes, you can live a healthy and fulfilling life if you learn how to manage it. Also, early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes can reduce the health complications as a result of diabetes. Diabetes refers to a medical condition where your blood glucose levels are too high. Glucose is a form of sugar which is one of the main sources of energy that is derived from the food we eat. Your body will produce insulin to help glucose enter the cells for energy. In case your body does not produce enough insulin or use it properly, glucose will stay in the blood. Too much glucose in the blood can lead to serious health problems such as kidney damage and nerve damage. There are two common types of diabetes, i.e. type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. What is type 1 diabetes (T1D)? T1D occurs when the immune system attacks the beta cells in the pancreas, which are responsible for producing insulin. Without insulin, the body cells cannot absorb glucose from the blood. This leads to a build up of glucose in the blood. To stabilize their blood sugar levels, people with type 1 diabetes are prescribed to use insulin injection every day. T1D diagnosis is most common in childhood/young. The method of treatment for this condition involves injecting insulin under the skin. If you have T1D, you can live a healthy long life so long as you make the necessary changes to your lifestyle and follow your treatment plan. What is type 2 diabetes (T2D)? Previously known as non i Continue reading >>

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

When people hear that you have diabetes, they start to make assumptions that aren't always accurate. A lot of the confusion stems from the fact that there are two main types, yet many people don't understand how they're different. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get daily healthy living tips delivered straight to your inbox!) As someone with type 1 diabetes—I was diagnosed with it nearly 40 years ago—I'm all too familiar with the disease. I lived with it as a child, teen, and adult, and when I decided to have kids I had to figure out how to manage the condition while being pregnant. (I even wrote a book about it, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby.) Having type 1 diabetes means I'm in the minority: Of the approximately 29 million Americans who have diabetes, only 1.25 million have type 1. Most have type 2, which is a totally different form. "Comparing type 1 to type 2 is like comparing apples to tractors," says Gary Scheiner, a Pennsylvania-based certified diabetes educator and author of Think Like a Pancreas. "The only thing they really have in common is that both involve an inability to control blood sugar levels." Here are 5 important distinctions. 1. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease; type 2 isn't. Diabetes happens when your body has trouble with insulin, a hormone that helps convert sugar from the food you eat into energy. When there isn’t enough insulin in your body, sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can make you sick. People with type 1 and type 2 both face this problem, but how they arrived there is quite different. If you have type 1, you don't make any insulin at all. That's because type 1 is an autoimmune disease in which your immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-making cells in your Continue reading >>

What Are The Main Differences Between Type I And Type Ii Diabetes?

What Are The Main Differences Between Type I And Type Ii Diabetes?

With Type I Diabetes, the body no longer makes insulin (5-10% of cases). With Type II Diabetes, the body's cells do not use insulin properly. Sometimes this is called "Insulin Resistance" (90-95% of cases). It is a progressive disease and insulin may be necessary. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Can You Tell Type 1 And Type 2 Apart?

Diabetes Symptoms: Can You Tell Type 1 And Type 2 Apart?

Diabetes is a life-long condition that causes a person’s blood sugar level to rise too high. New research by healthcare provider Abbott into the country’s views on diabetes has found 43 per of UK adults can’t tell the two types apart, despite the fact they have significant differences. Type 1 is when the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin by mistake, damaging the pancreas and causing it to be unable to produce insulin and move it out of the bloodstream into cells. It is often inherited - if you have a close relative with it there’s a six per cent chance you’ll suffer too - and it can cause serious long-term health problems, including blindness, kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Type 2 is the most common, with 90 per cent of diabetes suffers in the UK falling into that category. Type 2, on the other hand, is when the body doesn't produce enough insulin - or the body's cells don't react to insulin - meaning that glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy. This type is commonly associated with obesity and old age, and triggers the same long-term health problems as type 1. According to the NHS, the second type is the most common, with 90 per cent of diabetes suffers in the UK falling into that category. Then there’s gestational diabetes - when women experience high levels of blood glucose during pregnancy - and pre-diabetes, the stage below full-blown diabetes when blood sugar is still above the normal range. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Symptoms are similar for any type of diabetes. These include being very thirsty, going Continue reading >>

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