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What Are Impaired Blood Glucose Levels?

Impaired Fasting Glycemia

Impaired Fasting Glycemia

A person with impaired fasting glycemia isn't able to process glucose as efficiently as they should be able to Impaired fasting glycemia (IFG) may also be known as pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome. Impaired fasting glycemia occurs when blood glucose levels in the body are elevated during periods of fasting , but not enough to prompt a diagnosis of diabetes. Effectively, a person with impaired fasting glycemia isnt able to process glucose as efficiently as they should be able to. What are the health implications of impaired fasting glycemia? People with impaired fasting glycemia face a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes, despite having less of a risk than those with impaired glucose tolerance. The risk of developing cardiovascular disease is also lower than for people with impaired glucose tolerance . What does impaired fasting glycemia mean? Impaired fasting glycemia (IFG) means that the body cannot regulate glucose as efficiently as it should be able to. Glucose is usually carried around the body where it is absorbed and made into energy. Insulin regulates the concentration of glucose in the blood. IFG occurs when this process isnt functioning as effectively as it could, and effects millions of people in the UK. What are the symptoms of impaired fasting glycemia? Unfortunately, IFG may exhibit very little in the way of symptoms, meaning diagnosis often takes a long time. Many people diagnosed with IFG are overweight, have high blood pressure, increased cholesterol levels or a family history of IFG. So how do I know if my IFG becomes type 2 diabetes? IFG increases type 2 diabetes risk, so go straight to your doctor or healthcare professional if you feel unnaturally thirsty, pass more urine than usual, have recurrent infections, have blurred vision, or if your Continue reading >>

Impaired Fasting Glucose

Impaired Fasting Glucose

Impaired fasting glucose, or Impaired Fasting Glycemia (IFG) is a type of prediabetes, in which a person's blood sugar levels during fasting are consistently above the normal range, but below the diagnostic cut-off for a formal diagnosis of diabetes mellitus.[1] Together with impaired glucose tolerance, it is a sign of insulin resistance. In this manner, it is also one of the conditions associated with Metabolic Syndrome. Those with impaired fasting glucose are at an increased risk of vascular complications of diabetes, though to a lesser extent. The risks are cumulative, with both higher blood glucose levels, and the total amount of time it spends elevated, increasing the overall complication rate. IFG can eventually progress to type 2 diabetes mellitus without intervention, which typically involves lifestyle modification. Those with impaired fasting glucose have a 1.5 fold increased risk of developing clinical diabetes within 10 years, when compared to the general population. Some studies suggest that without lifestyle changes, IFG will progress to clinically diagnosable diabetes in just under 3 years, on average.[2] Impaired fasting glucose is often, though not always, associated with impaired glucose tolerance, though it may occur in isolation, with such persons having a normal response to a glucose tolerance test. Signs and Symptoms[edit] Impaired fasting glucose is often without any signs or symptoms, other than higher than normal glucose levels being detected in an individual's fasting blood sample. There may be signs and symptoms associated with elevated blood glucose, though these are likely to be minor, with significant symptoms suggestive of complete progression to type 2 diabetes. Such symptoms include:[3] Increased thirst Increased urination, especially wak Continue reading >>

Medical Definition Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Medical Definition Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Amputations. INVOKANA® may increase your risk of lower-limb amputations. Amputations mainly involve removal of the toe or part of the foot; however, amputations involving the leg, below and above the knee, have also occurred. Some people had more than one amputation, some on both sides of the body. Youmay be at a higher risk of lower-limb amputation if you: have a history of amputation, have heart disease or are at risk for heart disease, have had blocked or narrowed blood vessels (usually in leg), have damage to the nerves (neuropathy)in the leg, or have had diabetic foot ulcers or sores. Call your doctor right away if you have new pain or tenderness, any sores, ulcers, or infections in your leg or foot. Your doctor may decide to stop your INVOKANA®. Talk to your doctor about proper foot care Dehydration. INVOKANA® can cause some people to become dehydrated (the loss of too much body water), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). Youmay be at higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure (including diuretics [water pills]), are on a low sodium (salt) diet, have kidney problems, or are 65 years of age orolder Yeast infection of the penis (balanitis or balanoposthitis).Men who take INVOKANA® may get a yeast infection of the skin around the penis. Symptoms include: redness, itching, or swelling of the penis; rash of the penis; foul-smelling discharge from the penis;or pain in the skin around penis Before you take INVOKANA®, tell your doctor if you have a history of amputation; heart disease or are at risk for heart disease; blocked or narrowed blood vessels (usually in leg); damage to the nerves (neuropathy) of your leg; diabetic f Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that blood glucose screening for adults begin at age 45, or sooner if you are overweight and have additional risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. There are several blood tests for prediabetes. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test This test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the test measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. In general: An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal An A1C level between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates type 2 diabetes Certain conditions can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you are pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant). Fasting blood sugar test A blood sample is taken after you fast for at least eight hours or overnight. In general: A fasting blood sugar level below 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — 5.6 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) — is considered normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 7.0 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. This result is sometimes called impaired fasting glucose. A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L) or higher indicates type 2 diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test This test is usually used to diagnose diabetes only during pregnancy. A blood sample is taken after you fast for at least eight hours or overnight. Then you'll drink a sugary solution, and your blood sugar level will be measured again after two hours. In general: A blood sugar level less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmo Continue reading >>

Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose: Summary - Ahrq Evidence Report Summaries - Ncbi Bookshelf

Diagnosis, Prognosis, And Treatment Of Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose: Summary - Ahrq Evidence Report Summaries - Ncbi Bookshelf

NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. AHRQ Evidence Report Summaries. Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); 1998-2005. This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date. This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date. 128Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment of Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Impaired Fasting Glucose: Summary PL Santaguida, C Balion, D Hunt, K Morrison, H Gerstein, P Raina, L Booker, and H Yazdi. Diabetes mellitus (DM) and its associated disease outcomes are a growing concern worldwide. The current global prevalence of DM for all ages has been estimated at 2.8 percent and is predicted to reach 4.4 percent by 2030. 1 There is intense interest in identifying and treating risk factors that may prevent the onset of this disease and minimize morbidity. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are the intermediate metabolic states between normal and diabetic glucose homeostasis. These conditions are thought to be the precursors of DM, but the progression to overt disease is not straight-forward. The risk for both macrovascular and microvascular complications increases across the distribution of blood glucose concentrations well below the overt DM, and the risk is more strongly associated with post-challenge hyperglycemia than fasting glucose levels. However, it is unclear whether this glucose effect is independent of classical risk factors, such as blood pressure and lipids, or occurs due to abnormalities of other metabolites, such as free fatty acids. The goal of this systematic review is to evaluate the state of the evidence in the areas of the diagnosis Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

In pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range. Whilst this raised glucose level is not so high that you have diabetes, you are at increased risk of developing diabetes when you have pre-diabetes. You are also at increased risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke (cardiovascular diseases). If pre-diabetes is treated, it can help to prevent the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The most effective treatment is lifestyle changes, including eating a healthy balanced diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and doing regular physical activity. What is pre-diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If you have pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range but it is not so high that you have diabetes. However, if y Continue reading >>

Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose

Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose

Impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose form an intermediate stage in the natural history of diabetes mellitus. From 10 to 15 percent of adults in the United States have one of these conditions. Impaired glucose tolerance is defined as two-hour glucose levels of 140 to 199 mg per dL (7.8 to 11.0 mmol) on the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, and impaired fasting glucose is defined as glucose levels of 100 to 125 mg per dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol per L) in fasting patients. These glucose levels are above normal but below the level that is diagnostic for diabetes. Patients with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose have a significant risk of developing diabetes and thus are an important target group for primary prevention. Risk factors for diabetes include family history of diabetes, body mass index greater than 25 kg per m2, sedentary lifestyle, hypertension, dyslipidemia, history of gestational diabetes or large-for-gestational-age infant, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Blacks, Latin Americans, Native Americans, and Asian-Pacific Islanders also are at increased risk for diabetes. Patients at higher risk should be screened with a fasting plasma glucose level. When the diagnosis of impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose is made, physicians should counsel patients to lose 5 to 7 percent of their body weight and engage in moderate physical activity for at least 150 minutes per week. Drug therapy with metformin or acarbose has been shown to delay or prevent the onset of diabetes. However, medications are not as effective as lifestyle changes, and it is not known if treatment with these drugs is cost effective in the management of impaired glucose tolerance. Definitions and Epidemiology An expert committee sponsored by the American Di Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

A condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, but not yet within the diabetic range. Prediabetes is also known as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The new term was inaugurated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in March 2002 to promote public understanding of this increasingly widespread problem. According to HHS, nearly 57 million Americans have prediabetes. Studies have shown that most people with blood glucose levels in the prediabetes range go on to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10 years; the condition also raises the risk of having a heart attack or stroke by 50%. Prediabetes can be controlled, and in many cases even reversed, through lifestyle changes. Prediabetes can be detected by either of the two standard tests currently used to diagnose diabetes. In the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG), a person fasts overnight and then has blood drawn for testing first thing in the morning, before he eats. Until recently, a normal fasting blood glucose level under 110 mg/dl was considered to be normal and fasting blood glucose in the range of 110 to 125 mg/dl indicated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or prediabetes. In late 2003, an international expert panel recommended that the cutoff be lowered to 100 mg/dl, so now people with a fasting blood glucose level of 100 to 125 mg/dl are considered to have prediabetes. A fasting blood glucose level over 125 mg/dl indicates diabetes. (A second test must be done on a subsequent day to confirm a diagnosis of diabetes.) In the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a person’s blood glucose is tested once after an overnight fast and again two hours after he has consumed a special, glucose-rich drink. A normal blood glucose Continue reading >>

Managing Impaired Glucose Tolerance In Primary Care

Managing Impaired Glucose Tolerance In Primary Care

Managing Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Primary Care This article is for Medical Professionals Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles . Managing Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Primary Care Impaired glucose tolerance is defined as a fasting plasma glucose concentration of less than 7.0 mmol/L with a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test value of 7.8 to 11.1 mmol/L[ 1 ]. Impaired fasting glycaemia is defined as a fasting glucose of 6.1 to 6.9 mmol/L. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended that people with an HbA1c of 4247 mmol/mol (6.0-6.5%) are at high risk of diabetes[ 2 ]. Impaired glucose tolerance, typically characterised by hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance, is considered to be a stage in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease[ 3 ]. Therefore, impaired glucose tolerance is often referred to as pre-diabetes. The prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance increases linearly from about 15% in middle age to 35-40% in the elderly[ 4 ]. Evidence suggests that a 1 kg/m2 increase in body mass index (BMI) increases the risk of developing new-onset type 2 diabetes by 8.4%. The risk of impaired fasting glucose rises by 9.5%[ 2 ]. Other investigations similar to those for people with type 2 diabetes may be indicated. Several cardiovascular findings are more prevalent, including hypertension , angina and medical history of atherosclerosis and stroke . Hyperlipidaemia is also often associated. Intervention can favourably influence the clinical course of impaired glucose to Continue reading >>

Impaired Fasting Glucose Concentrations In Nondiabetic Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease: A Marker For A Worse Prognosis.

Impaired Fasting Glucose Concentrations In Nondiabetic Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease: A Marker For A Worse Prognosis.

Impaired fasting glucose concentrations in nondiabetic patients with ischemic heart disease: a marker for a worse prognosis. Cardiac Rehabilitation Institute, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, 526521 Tel-Hashomer, Israel. [email protected] The issue of whether glucose concentrations below the diabetic threshold may be predictive of increased cardiovascular risk has not yet been fully elucidated. The current study evaluates the prognosis of nondiabetic patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) over a 7.7-year follow-up period. A total of 11,853 patients with documented coronary artery disease aged between 45 and 74 years were examined. Patients were divided into 3 groups on the basis of their fasting blood glucose levels at screening: nondiabetic individuals, patients with IFG, and undiagnosed diabetic patients. Patients who were on any type of pharmacologic antidiabetic treatment were excluded from the study. Mortality rates were assessed separately for each group. The population comprised 9773 nondiabetic patients (82.4%, glucose up to 109 mg/dL), 1258 patients with IFG levels (10.6%, glucose 110-125 mg/dL), and 822 diabetic subjects (7%, glucose > or =126 mg/dL). Patients were followed up from 6.2 to 9.0 years (mean follow-up period 7.7 +/- 1.5 years). Crude mortality was lower in the nondiabetic subjects than in the 2 other groups. All-cause mortality in the nondiabetic group was 14.3% compared to 20.1% in patients with IFG and 24.3% in the undiagnosed (P <.001). Multivariate adjustment showed the lowest mortality in nondiabetic subjects, who exhibited a survival rate of 0.86 at the end of the follow-up, whereas the lowest survival-0.75-was seen among undiagnosed diabetic patients (P =.0001). An intermediate value of 0.78 was docum Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance (igt)

Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance (igt)

People with IGT have blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to say they have diabetes. This condition is diagnosed using the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). After a fast of 8 to12 hours, a person's blood glucose is measured before and 2 hours after drinking a glucose-containing solution. In normal glucose tolerance, blood glucose rises no higher than 140 mg/dl 2 hours after the drink. In impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), the 2-hour blood glucose is between 140 and 199 mg/dl. If the 2-hour blood glucose rises to 200 mg/dl or above, a person has diabetes. How does the fasting blood glucose test differ from the oral glucose tolerance test? In the fasting blood glucose test, a person's blood glucose is measured after a fast of 8 to 12 hours: A person with normal blood glucose has a blood glucose level below 100. A person with impaired fasting glucose has a blood glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dl. If the fasting blood glucose level rises to126 mg/dl or above, a person has diabetes. The OGTT includes measures of blood glucose levels after a fast and after a glucose challenge. In 1997, an American Diabetes Association (ADA) expert panel recommended that doctors use the fasting blood glucose test to screen their patients for diabetes because the test is easier and less costly than the OGTT. Though the fasting glucose test detects most diabetes cases, the OGTT is more sensitive in identifying people with blood glucose problems that may first appear only after a glucose challenge. For a person with IGT, what is the risk of developing type 2 diabetes? As few as 1 to as many as 10 of every 100 persons with IGT will develop diabetes per year. The risk of getting diabetes rises as people become more overweight and more sedentary, have a stronge Continue reading >>

Impaired Fasting Glucose

Impaired Fasting Glucose

Barbara J. Ehrmann, in A Comprehensive Guide to Geriatric Rehabilitation (Third Edition) , 2014 An elevated fasting glucose is one of several risk factors that is known to increase an individuals risk of developing heart disease, stroke and diabetes. These risk factors, grouped together, are called the metabolic syndrome. Other characteristics include obesity, particularly abdominal fat, hyperlipidemia and hypertension. The criteria for metabolic syndrome are met by having any three of the following risk factors, as recently defined by the American Heart Association and International Diabetes Federation: (i) an elevated waist circumference (abdominal obesity); (ii) an elevated triglyceride level of 150mg/dl or greater; (iii) a reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL good cholesterol) level of less than 40mg/dl for men and less than 50mg/dl for women; (iv) an elevated blood pressure of 130/85mmHg or higher; and (v) an elevated fasting glucose of 100mg/dl or higher (Alberti et al., 2009). Fifty-two percent of males and 54% of females in the US over the age of 60 met the criteria for metabolic syndrome for the years 20032006 (Ervin, 2009). Karen Z. Walker, Kerin ODea, in Nutritional and Therapeutic Interventions for Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome , 2012 Individuals with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance are at high risk of progression to type 2 diabetes. This disease can be delayed or prevented through changes to dietary pattern and increased physical activity. Large prospective studies following high-risk individuals for a period of 2.56 years indicate that lifestyle change may reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes by 2868%. Moreover, diabetes incidence rates continue to be depressed many years after completion of the supervised phase of a lifestyle Continue reading >>

Impaired Fasting Glycaemia

Impaired Fasting Glycaemia

This factsheet is for people who have impaired fasting glycaemia, or who would like information about it. Impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) is sometimes called pre-diabetes. This is when blood glucose levels in the body are raised, but are not high enough to mean that the person has diabetes. IFG means that the body isn't able to use glucose as efficiently as it should. Impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) means that your body isn't able to regulate glucose as efficiently as it should. Glucose is a simple form of sugar found in foods and sugary drinks it's absorbed as a natural part of digestion. One function of your blood is to carry glucose around your body. When glucose reaches body tissues, such as muscle cells, it's absorbed and converted into energy. The glucose concentration in your blood is automatically regulated by a hormone called insulin. The amount of glucose in your blood changes throughout the day. Its higher and lower depending on what youre eating and drinking. Blood glucose levels can be measured in a laboratory by testing a blood sample. This is usually done when you have not eaten for eight hours and is called a fasting blood glucose test. Its estimated that seven million people in the UK have IFG. IFG has no symptoms and can often go undiagnosed for years. Although there are no symptoms, many people diagnosed with IFG are overweight. Nine out of 10 people with IFG have high blood pressure, raised cholesterol levels or a family history of the condition. IFG can increase your risk of type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms, but if you do have symptoms they might include: If you have any of these symptoms, you should talk to your GP. Complications of impaired fasting glycaemia IFG can lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. P Continue reading >>

Perceived Symptoms In People Living With Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Perceived Symptoms In People Living With Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Copyright © 2011 Susanne Andersson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract The aim of the study was to identify symptoms in people with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and describe their experiences of living with the symptoms which they related to their condition. Twenty-one participants, from a cross-sectional population-based study, diagnosed as having IGT, were invited for an interview. The interviews were analyzed in two phases by means of a manifest and latent content analysis. The narratives included seven categories of symptoms (and more than 25 different symptoms) presented by the respondents. This study shows that symptoms such as the patient's own interpretation of different perceptions in the body must be considered, as well as signs and/or objective observations. Symptoms ought to be seen as complementary components in the health encounter and health conversation. The results of this study indicate that health professionals should increase their awareness of the balance between the implicit and the explicit bodily sensations that individuals communicate. Further studies are needed. 1. Introduction Living with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) means living with an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and is preceded by a long period without symptoms, which is why IGT often remains undetected for a long period of time [1, 2]. At the same time, the prevalence of T2DM is predicted to increase in future decades [3–5], thus emphasizing the importance of identifying additional aspects of understanding what it means to live with IGT. The diagnosis of Continue reading >>

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