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What Are Diabetic Insoles?

Diabetic Insoles | Ebay

Diabetic Insoles | Ebay

A Closed-Cell Nitrogen Injected Spenco Material exclusive cushioning layer provides long lasting cushioning, reduced friction, and extra comfort. Designed for use in casual, diabetic and extra depth... Pressure relief, best insoles for people with diabetes or arthritis. Designed for diabetes, arthritis, and other conditions resulting in sensitive feet. HappyStep Orthotics Insoles. Multiple layer con... I am offering a pair of Apex insoles Sz. W 9 #1 Doctor recommended for Diabetes related foot problems. Dual Density insoles made of PPT and Plastizote used by diabetic patients to help prevent ulcers. Top (peach) layer molds to your foot and bottom (blue) layer adds padding. These are the insoles used ... top cover to help eliminate points that can cause blisters. Spenco's proprietary TOTALSUPPORT. Premium Full-Length Insoles specifically designed for the diabetic foot. impact zones and. Technolo... A Plastazote top cover to help eliminate points that can cause blisters. Premium Full-Length Insoles specifically designed for the diabetic foot. For half sizes order the next size down. The Shape T... Spenco Rx Diabetic Support Foot Beds Full Length Insoles. Comfort and support are critical for Diabetic and pre-Diabetic foot care. Spenco Diabetic Support Foot Beds provide an exclusive full-length... Tacco Sugar-Ex Diabetic Insoles. The patented insoles functions as a "foot pump" and promotes an increased flow of blood in the lower extremities. This unique foam provides optimal comfort and encoura... Tacco Sugar-Ex Diabetic Insoles. The patented insoles functions as a "foot pump" and promotes an increased flow of blood in the lower extremities. This unique foam provides optimal comfort and encoura... SPENCO 4603305 Diabetic Insole,Unisex,PR G7468478 MPN: 4603305, SKU: G746847 Continue reading >>

​how Does Diabetes Affect My Foot?

​how Does Diabetes Affect My Foot?

The application of the diabetic foot care program is part of an integrated rehabilitation process--and you are the most important team member! The relationship with your orthotist/pedorthist is a lifelong commitment to your health, walking ability, independence and overall quality of life. Diabetes will affect your foot in three ways. How you care for your diabetes and manage your sugars will impact how soon these changes occur and the severity of the impact. If your sugar levels are always high, you may notice changes as soon as 10 years from your diagnosis. If your sugar levels are kept under control, these changes will occur very slowly. The Three Changes: Diabetes makes your nerves in your feet fall asleep. Nerves supply the tiny muscles inside your feet. When the nerves fall asleep, the foot muscles become weak. The nerves become weak and do not work, which can make your feet numb and you will not be able to feel the bottom of your feet. Your feet can change shape and develop curled or crooked toes, bony bumps, flatter feet or wider feet, and calluses. Nerves also supply the sweat glands to your feet. If the nerves fall asleep, your feet do not sweat and you get dry feet. Blood flow to your feet decreases. Diabetes decreases the amount of blood that flows to your feet. Blood brings food and oxygen to the feet. It also brings medicines to your feet. If you are taking medication for an infection, the full dose of the medicine may not reach your feet. If your blood flow is weakened, your skin can become thinner. This can cause you to get cuts or sores more readily. The decreased blood flow also slows down the healing process, which can cause long-term infections. Infections are harder to cure. Diabetes weakens your immune system and your ability to fight an infection. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Insoles | Diabetic Foot Pain Relief |orthotic Shop

Diabetic Insoles | Diabetic Foot Pain Relief |orthotic Shop

Propet Contour Pro - Diabetic Insoles - 3 Pair Propet Contour Pro - Insoles - Men's - Free Shipping. The Propet A5512 Diabetic Orthotic Inlay is specifically designed to offer diabetic patients comfort and safety in each step. This diabetic orthotic doesn't compress or collapse - it uses a high rebounding moldable polyurethane base for long-lasting diabetic foot protection. The top layer is made with Plastazote material and the base layer contains EZ Form Foam. The Propet A5512 Diabetic Orthotic Inlay is Sadmerc coded and is designed for quick and easy fitting so diabetic patients experience less sheer motion and friction inside their shoes. Synergy Liquid Orthotics - massaging insoles designed to re-balance, cushion massage and invigorate the foot with each step you take. Helps improve blood circulation as you walk. Satisfaction guaranteed. See size chart below. Archcrafters Delicate Custom Comfort Insoles - great for sensitive feet. Poron plastazote conforming topcover for shock absorption. Medium density for cushioning & arch support. $119.95 at the Orthotic Shop Continue reading >>

Insoles: Diabetic And Arthritis Insoles

Insoles: Diabetic And Arthritis Insoles

Excessive pressure on the diabetic footbrought on by an unyielding shoe insole, inadequate arch support, or a poorly fitted shoeoften results in ulceration and subsequent amputation. To keep feet properly supported and protected, its important to use insoles that offer total contact, support, and comfort. Insoles like the Duo/Laminate D-Sole , FREEDOM Trilaminate 1 Insole , and FREEDOM Full-Contact Insole utilize Plastazote or a similar material that has gained a reputation for use with the neuropathic foot and in managing the arthritic foot. These materials offer maximum cushioning and superior pressure distribution for the entire plantar surface. Incorporated heel cup and longitudinal arch combine for stabilization, support, and a comfortable fit. Add accommodations, such as scaphoid or met pads, for additional relief to high-pressure areas. Heat-mold for a customized fit. Save time and keep a pair inside each pair of shoes to keep feet protected. Diabetic Insoles like the Duo/Laminate Insoles , FREEDOM Trilaminate Insoles , and FREEDOM Full-Contact Insoles , utilize Plastazote or a similar material that has gained a reputation for use with the neuropathic foot and in managing the arthritic foot. These materials offer cushioning and pressure distribution for the entire plantar surface. These diabetic insoles incorporate a heel cup and longitudinal arch that combine for stabilization, support and a comfortable fit. In addition to these insoles, you can add other accommodations, such as scaphoid pads or metatarsal pads , for additional relief to high-pressure areas. All of these insoles can be heat molded for a customized fit. If you are looking to make your own customized diabetic insoles, we also have a diabetic orthosis kit of insole materials . Continue reading >>

Diabetic Insoles (june 2018) - Insoles Clarity

Diabetic Insoles (june 2018) - Insoles Clarity

You are here: Home Reviews Diabetic Insoles Many people are unaware that diabetes involves more than managing ones sugar consumption diabetics also get an immense amount of foot problems! Read further for more information on why diabetics need diabetic insoles, what diabetic insoles aim to achieve as well as some of their best features that aid diabetics lead a more comfortable lifestyle. 5 Reasons Diabetics Need Orthotic Insoles If you have diabetes type 1 or type 2, you will need insoles to help your feet somewhere along the line. Here are five major reasons as to why: Peripheral Neuropathy After prolonged nerve damage due to sugar and insulin spikes which leads up to this condition, peripheral neuropathy often develops. This means that the hands and feet (sometimes even the knees and elbows) will become entirely numb. Blood flow in a diabetic is also usually weaker, which adds to peripheral neuropathy. Diabetics need insoles to protect their feet when theyre numb, as they can incur injuries easily without being aware. Diabetics also take a lot longer to heal from injuries and are more prone to infections or internal bleeding from bruises all the horror stories of diabetics needing to amputate toes from wounds like this often came to being from insufficient protective foot gear! Plantar Fasciitis Diabetic feet tend to tire out faster than healthy feet. Plantar fasciitis is a condition where the arches of the feet are overtired and start to ache. Heel Spurs Since a diabetics blood flow is not as good as it once was, the body is not as good at eliminating by-products from the blood stream, such as calcium deposits. This can result in heel spurs in the worst cases of diabetes. Heel spurs are tiny hardened calcium deposits that sit under the heel, and they are very painf Continue reading >>

Diabetic Insoles | Orthopedic Shoe Inserts By Pedors

Diabetic Insoles | Orthopedic Shoe Inserts By Pedors

Pedors 3P Comfort Insoles / Diabetic Inserts (Pack Of Three Pairs) Pay With:VISA, MasterCard, Amex, Discover, Diners, Amazon Pay, PayPal, PayPal Credit, Apple Pay, VISA Checkout, Klarna Credit or Check What makes the Pedors 3P such a good diabetic insert / comfort insole? Our hugely popular Pedors 3P Inserts have been designed to ensure total contact with the plantar or bottom surface of the foot. Total plantar surface contact is the key for comfort as it ensures even weight distribution and reduces pressure points that can cause pain or discomfort. 3) a soft heat moldable top layer that molds to your foot as you wear the product. Typically you should order your regular shoe size, or if you are also buying shoes from Pedors.com, the same size as the shoes you are buying. The 3P insert is sized to the Pedors last or shape of our shoes, however they can also be worn with shoes that are deep enough to accommodate them. Typically tennis shoes, walking shoes, and other orthopedic shoes will be fine. If you are wanting to use some inserts in your Pedors Mary Janes, we recommend using the thinner Pedors 2P Inserts . Sometimes it may be neccessary to trim the inserts to fit perfectly into non-Pedors shoes. To do that remove the insole or liner(s) that come with the shoe and using them as a template, trace around the bottom outside layer of the 3P insert. These trace lines will serve as your trim lines. Use a pair of heavy scissors to trim as necessary. In almost all cases however, the inserts will not need to be trimmed. Can I use my 3P inserts with my Pedors shoes? Absolutely. If you are wanting to use some inserts in your Pedors Mary Janes, we recommend using the thinner Pedors 2P Inserts . Can I use my 3P inserts with other brands? Yes. Provided the shoe is deep enough and Continue reading >>

Effectiveness Of Diabetic Insoles To Reduce Foot Pressures

Effectiveness Of Diabetic Insoles To Reduce Foot Pressures

Volume 36, Issue 4 , JulyAugust 1997, Pages 268-271 Effectiveness of diabetic insoles to reduce foot pressures Get rights and content The F-Scan system was used to measure peak plantar pressures in 11 diabetics each with a unilateral great toe amputation and an intact contralateral extremity (nonamputated), to evaluate the effectiveness of five footwear-insole strategies: 1) extra-depth shoes without an insole, 2) extra-depth shoes with a Plastizote1 insole, 3) extra-depth shoes with a Plastizote insole and a metatarsal pad, 4) extra-depth shoes with a Plastizote insole and a medial longitudinal arch pad, and 5) extra-depth shoes with a Plastizote insole and a combination of metatarsal pad and arch pad. When we compared extra-depth shoes with and without insoles, peak pressures were significantly reduced with insoles under the first metatarsal, the lesser metatarsals, and the heel (p < 0.001) in feet with and without an amputation, as well as under the great toe on the contralateral foot (nonamputated, p < 0.001), but not under the lesser toes (giant toe, p = 0.088; nonamputated, p = 0.763). There was no significant difference between the different insole modifications. Continue reading >>

Gel Insoles For Neuropathy

Gel Insoles For Neuropathy

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Peripheral Neuropathy in my feet. Mainly underneath toes which feel numb but very tender/sore. Have collected some suitable shoes and some ProtectIT socks on order. Looking for some suggestions on Gel Insoles that will help cushion under the feet and specifically the toes. Toes are ridiculously tender I am hoping gel insoles will help but unsure which ones are best. In this week's press - the NHS has taken a major leap towards "prevention rather than cure" by approving Liqua Care Diabetic Flowgel Orthotics for prescription issue. See www.liquacare.co.uk for more info. In this week's press - the NHS has taken a major leap towards "prevention rather than cure" by approving Liqua Care Diabetic Flowgel Orthotics for prescription issue. See www.liquacare.co.uk for more info. Great info this is - will certainly ask my GP for a pair of these Winter is only around the corner and my toots are sensitive also . Great info this is - will certainly ask my GP for a pair of these Winter is only around the corner and my toots are sensitive also . douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member Brilliant, I spend ages on my feet, so I'll be asking for a pair. Anything that prevents complications has to be worth going for. Im gonna see if I can get some of them, I suffer terribly from cold feet. I've been reading up lately on bio magnetic therapy for neuropathy and there is some promising results from studies that have even conducted. There are these magnetic soles worn in your shoes. Fro Continue reading >>

10 Best Diabetic Insoles

10 Best Diabetic Insoles

by Jessica Hegg April 09, 2018 0 Comments For those living with diabetes, proper foot care is extremely important. If your shoes arent doing the trick, diabetic insoles can provide the comfort and relief you need. Use them to keep painful symptoms at bay, while allowing for full circulation as you go about your day-to-day. Below, weve compiled a list of ten insoles for diabetes that are the most comfortable and effective. With a unique honeycomb design, these insoles are designed to reduce foot pain by absorbing the impact of each step. To provide even more stability, they also have a firmer layer of gel to cradle your heel and support the arch of your foot. Although theyre designed to fit inside most shoes, they can be trimmed down to size, and theyre made of a lightweight and breathable material. Easy to cut to the right size, if necessary These insoles were designed with total foot health in mind. They provide arch support while protecting against over-pronation, and also work to help to relieve pain in the ball of the foot. Theyre made out of a material called platazote, which is soft, self-molding, and long-lasting. The unique design of these gel shoe insoles works to reduce pain on pressure points by absorbing the impact of each step. Theyre designed to contour to each foot, and can easily be worn inside most shoe styles--but if they dont fit, its easy to cut them down to the correct size. Theyre made from a lightweight, antimicrobial gel that wont flatten or lose its shape after extensive use. These insoles feature a special bladder design, which is filled with foam and cushioning gel to provide arch support and shape perfectly to your foots contours. Because theyre designed to provide so much support, they help stabilize the foot, absorb shock and alleviate pai Continue reading >>

Neat Feat Diabetic Self Molding Insole - For Diabetes And Arthritis

Neat Feat Diabetic Self Molding Insole - For Diabetes And Arthritis

There are: 4 reviews, with an average rating of 4.5 out of 5Neat Feat Diabetic Self Molding Insole - For Diabetes and Arthritis Neat Feat Diabetic Self Molding Insole - For Diabetes and Arthritis 4I bought these after suffering achilles tendinosis and plantar faciitis in both feet for 2 plus years! The inserts have given me a good measure of relief that I never thought I would ever get again! Still a long way to go but at least I can walk around the house without wanting to cut my feet off! I am using them in a sling back sandal as I can't stand a shoe yet and am having trouble getting them to stay in place without having to resort to glue. I guess I will just have to buy more and glue them into every shoe I have :) just a tip, for sandal wearers, can you make your inserts not quite so bright coloured please. Neat Feat Diabetic Self Molding Insole - For Diabetes and Arthritis 4I don't have diabetes, but I walk a lot around a lot on the hard pavement in the city and between suburbs. I bought these after my last pair of arched insoles flattened out at the ball of the foot. Ive used these for a week -- they dont mould to your feet as described but they provide more cushioning than regular insoles. I cut them to size, but they take up a lot of space in the shoe, and would suit lace-ups shoes rather than mary-janes. Neat Feat Diabetic Self Molding Insole - For Diabetes and Arthritis 5I have been wearing these inserts in every pair of flat shoes I own for about 5 years now. They are the only inserts that make a difference to the pain level from arthritis. I have very narrow , thin feet so having these in my shoes is a great relief. Neat Feat Diabetic Self Molding Insole - For Diabetes and Arthritis 5I have just bought a pair of these insoles so just getting used to them at t Continue reading >>

Why Wear Special Shoes For Diabetes?

Why Wear Special Shoes For Diabetes?

No one told me that Type 2 diabetes would make my feet hurt. It was one of those surprises that developed after a few years with this sneaky condition. Burning feet from what my podiatrist called plantar fasciitis was just the beginning. Heel spurs made walking a misery. On top of it all, I was dealing with peripheral neuropathy, the numbness and pain in feet, hands, arms, and legs that comes along with nerve damage from high blood sugar. I did not become aware of my Type 2 diabetes until it had been around for a while. If that happened to you as well, your smallest blood vessels and nerves may have already been damaged before you began treating your diabetes. Early signs of this are feet that feel numb in some spots and extremely sensitive in others. Worst of all, diabetes can also make sores and scratches slow to heal. Reading about foot ulcers and amputations brought home to me how important it is to take care of my feet. Because they take a beating every day, our feet deserve extra care and protection. Diabetes makes this absolutely necessary. My podiatrist recommended shoes made for people with diabetes. If your doctor does too, I encourage you to listen. My feet are living proof that those shoes work. Because of them I can walk again. How are shoes for diabetes different? Shoes for people with diabetes have a higher, wider toe box, giving your toes extra wiggle room. Toes that rub against each other or against a shoe get hot spots and blisters. Those do not heal for us as fast as they did before we had diabetes. Nerve damage caused by diabetes can make your toes feel numb. If this is the case, they cannot warn you when they are rubbing and blistering. The extra room in diabetes shoes protects your toes while you stand and walk. Now that you have diabetes, you need Continue reading >>

3-d Printing Customized Insoles For Diabetes Patients

3-d Printing Customized Insoles For Diabetes Patients

3-D printing customized insoles for diabetes patients November 2, 2016, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft 3D structures made of TPU for insoles. These structures were designed using CAD, and their properties were simulated and compared with experiments. Credit: Fraunhofer IWM In the past, insoles for patients with diabetes were hand-made by orthopedic shoemakers. In the future, these specialist shoemakers will be able to produce insoles more cost-effectively thanks to new software and the use of 3-D printers. This approach means the mechanical properties of each insole can be assessed scientifically and more effectively. Is your shoe too tight? Normally you would just shift your weight to take the pressure off the area that is sore. In people with diabetes, however, the nerve endings in the foot often become atrophied, and those affected cannot feel the soreness. This can give rise to pressure points and eventually wounds that heal badly. A remedy, or at least some relief, is promised by insoles that are very soft in the area of the injury, and that are custom-made by orthopedic shoemakers in a variety of materials. Up until now, however, it has not really been possible to assess the success of insoles scientifically each insole is a one-off item, after all. So it is in the interests of health insurances companies to have the process surrounding insoles digitalized to allow the collection of scientific data on them. It will soon be possible to digitalize the manufacture of insoles. LAUF, a German acronym for "laser-assisted construction of customized footwear", refers to a project funded by Germany's Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institutes for Mechanics of Materials IWM and for Environmental, Safety, and Energy Technology UMSICHT ar Continue reading >>

Effectiveness Of Diabetic Insoles To Reduce Foot Pressures.

Effectiveness Of Diabetic Insoles To Reduce Foot Pressures.

Effectiveness of diabetic insoles to reduce foot pressures. Ashry HR, et al. J Foot Ankle Surg. 1997 Jul-Aug. J Foot Ankle Surg. 1997 Jul-Aug;36(4):268-71; discussion 328-9. The F-Scan system was used to measure peak plantar pressures in 11 diabetics each with a unilateral great toe amputation and an intact contralateral extremity (nonamputated), to evaluate the effectiveness of five footwear-insole strategies: 1) extra-depth shoes without an insole, 2) extra-depth shoes with a Plastizote insole, 3) extra-depth shoes with a Plastizote insole and a metatarsal pad, 4) extra-depth shoes with a Plastizote insole and a medial longitudinal arch pad, and 5) extra-depth shoes with a Plastizote insole and a combination of metatarsal pad and arch pad. When we compared extra-depth shoes with and without insoles, peak pressures were significantly reduced with insoles under the first metatarsal, the lesser metatarsals, and the heel (p < 0.001) in feet with and without an amputation, as well as under the great toe on the contralateral foot (nonamputated, p < 0.001), but not under the lesser toes (giant toe, p = 0.088; nonamputated, p = 0.763). There was no significant difference between the different insole modifications. Continue reading >>

Insoles: An Exercise In Compromise

Insoles: An Exercise In Compromise

Diabetic feet need pampering and protection from microtrauma, but they also need stability and support. A diabetic insole, representing the ultimate middle ground between sock and shoe, should offer the best of all worlds: cushioning, structure, shock absorption, and durability. Gary M. Rothenberg, DPM, CDE, CWS, would describe himself as an insole man. I tend to be much more concerned about insoles than I am about shoes, said Rothenberg, attending podiatrist and director of residency training at the Miami VA Healthcare System. The insole is the contact point between the foot and the rest of the world. Im usually all right with an off-the-shelf shoe that can accommodate the insole that Ive prescribed. Needless to say, if it were up to most patients, that contact point would be as soft and comforting as possible. But diabetic patients, and those with neuropathy in particular, need an insole that can offer the best of all worlds: cushioning, structure, shock absorption, and durability. For optimal compressibility and density, the properties of the insole material closest to the skin should be similar to those of human skin, according to Roy H. Lidtke DPM, CPed, FACFAOM, associate professor of podiatric medicine and surgery at Des Moines University in Iowa and director of the Center for Clinical Biomechanics at St. Lukes Hospital in Cedar Rapids, IA. A plastazote with a Shore A20 compressibility factor is very close to skin. Butthe soft material is going to compress quickly. What you want is multidensity layering so that the insole lasts longer and you get the best of both worlds, added Lidtke, who is also an assistant professor of internal medicine, section of rheumatology, at Chicagos Rush University Medical Center. The best of both worlds means some combination of a va Continue reading >>

The Low Down On Diabetic Shoes

The Low Down On Diabetic Shoes

Diabetic therapeutic shoes are, in my opinion, one of the most important parts of my job. Diabetic shoes help save feet, plain and simple. According to the American Diabetes Association, each year 600,000 diabetic patients get foot ulcers, resulting in over 80,000 amputations. As a podiatric physician I try to embrace preventative care modalities such as regular diabetic foot exams and diabetic shoes to prevent my patients from getting foot ulcers. My patients will tell you that I’m a stickler about these things. I do understand patient concerns over cost, but the vast majority of insurances cover diabetic shoes and insoles. It is widely accepted that preventative medicine is the best medicine, and not only the monetary cost but also the emotional and physical cost of an amputation makes money spent on diabetic shoes and insoles money well spent. So, what makes diabetic shoes and insoles so different from your run-of-the-mill shoe? Which patients need them? And how do you know if insurance will cover them? Read on for the low down on diabetic shoes. The Definition: Diabetic shoes can also be referred to as extra depth or therapeutic shoes. They are specially designed shoes intended to reduce the risk of skin breakdown in diabetics with co-existing foot problems (such as neuropathy, poor circulation, and foot deformities). Why They’re So Special: Diabetic shoes are extra deep to accommodate diabetic insoles or orthotics. They have a built in firm heel counter to provide medial and lateral rearfoot stability. The toe box of the shoe is higher so there is plenty of room for toes (even ones that like to stick up like hammertoes). There is little to no stitching on the inside of a diabetic shoe. The stitching is on the outside. Sometimes even the smallest prominence can Continue reading >>

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