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What Are Diabetes Tests?

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Blood sugar (glucose) measurements are used to diagnose diabetes. They are also used to monitor glucose control for those people who are already known to have diabetes. Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If your glucose level remains high then you have diabetes. If the level goes too low then it is called hypoglycaemia. The main tests for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood are: Random blood glucose level. Fasting blood glucose level. The HbA1c blood test. Oral glucose tolerance test. Capillary blood glucose (home monitoring). Urine test for blood sugar (glucose). Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level Continue reading >>

What Are Some Weaknesses Of The Current Diabetic Test?

What Are Some Weaknesses Of The Current Diabetic Test?

Well, diabetic diagnostic tests are many, including blood tests and urine tests. Most commonly used tests are for fasting, post postprandial and random sugars. One of the issue with these tests are the variability of blood sugars over 24hrs. Blood sugar levels are influenced by body condition(for example if you have fever, it will be high), medications you take, food intake, exercises or physical activities, environmental and genetic factors and stress. We could get only a snapshot of the blood sugar levels at the time of testing. Even HBA1C(considered as a three month average) does not give a clear picture of the variability in sugars. Here modern 24hr glucose monitoring systems can help. Again the results of 24hr glucose charts can vary due to equipment inaccuracies. The lesson is that when you are testing your sugars, above facts should be in your mind. Observe it for long periods, find out the inaccuracies of measuring equipment, test in different labs and finally not to worry too much if your sugars in are almost in healthy range. Live a healthy life. Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

It's important for diabetes to be diagnosed early so treatment can be started as soon as possible. If you experience the symptoms of diabetes, visit your GP as soon as possible. They'll ask about your symptoms and may request blood and urine tests. Your urine sample will be tested for glucose. Urine doesn't normally contain glucose, but glucose can overflow through the kidneys and into your urine if you have diabetes. If your urine contains glucose, a specialised blood test known as glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) can be used to determine whether you have diabetes. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) In people who have been diagnosed with diabetes, the glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) test is often used to show how well their diabetes is being controlled. The HbA1c test gives your average blood glucose levels over the previous two to three months. The results can indicate whether the measures you're taking to control your diabetes are working. If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, it's recommended you have your HbA1c measured at least twice a year. However, you may need to have your HbA1c measured more frequently if: you've recently been diagnosed with diabetes your blood glucose remains too high your treatment plan has been changed Unlike other tests, such as the glucose tolerance test (GTT), the HbA1c test can be carried out at any time of day and doesn't require any special preparation, such as fasting. However, the test can't be used in certain situations, such as during pregnancy. The advantages associated with the HbA1c test make it the preferred method of assessing how well blood glucose levels are being controlled in a person with diabetes. HbA1c can also be used as a diagnostic test for diabetes and as a screening test for people at high risk of diabetes. HbA1c as a diagno Continue reading >>

The A1c Test & Diabetes

The A1c Test & Diabetes

What is the A1C test? The A1C test is a blood test that provides information about a person’s average levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar, over the past 3 months. The A1C test is sometimes called the hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c, or glycohemoglobin test. The A1C test is the primary test used for diabetes management and diabetes research. How does the A1C test work? The A1C test is based on the attachment of glucose to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. In the body, red blood cells are constantly forming and dying, but typically they live for about 3 months. Thus, the A1C test reflects the average of a person’s blood glucose levels over the past 3 months. The A1C test result is reported as a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher a person’s blood glucose levels have been. A normal A1C level is below 5.7 percent. Can the A1C test be used to diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Yes. In 2009, an international expert committee recommended the A1C test as one of the tests available to help diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes.1 Previously, only the traditional blood glucose tests were used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes. Because the A1C test does not require fasting and blood can be drawn for the test at any time of day, experts are hoping its convenience will allow more people to get tested—thus, decreasing the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes. However, some medical organizations continue to recommend using blood glucose tests for diagnosis. Why should a person be tested for diabetes? Testing is especially important because early in the disease diabetes has no symptoms. Although no test is perfect, the A1C and blood glucose tests are the best tools available to diagnose diabetes—a serious and li Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Tests And Checkups

Diabetes - Tests And Checkups

See your diabetes doctor for an exam every 3 to 6 months. During this exam, your doctor should check your: Blood pressure Weight Feet See your dentist every 6 months, also. Your doctor should check the pulses in your feet and your reflexes at least once a year. Your doctor should also look for: If you have had foot ulcers before, see your doctor every 3 to 6 months. It is always a good idea to ask your doctor to check your feet. An A1c lab test shows how well you are controlling your blood sugar levels over a 3-month period. The normal level is less than 5.7%. Most people with diabetes should aim for an A1C of less than 7%. Some people have a higher target. Your doctor will help decide what your target should be. Higher A1C numbers mean that your blood sugar is higher and that you may be more likely to have complications from your diabetes. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar (glucose) Test Strips

Blood Sugar (glucose) Test Strips

How often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers some diabetic test supplies, including blood sugar test strips as durable medical equipment (DME). Who's eligible? All people with Part B who have diabetes are covered. Your costs in Original Medicare If your supplier accepts assignment, you pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount, and the Part B deductible applies. Medicare pays for different kinds of DME in different ways. Depending on the type of equipment: You may need to rent the equipment. You may need to buy the equipment. You may be able to choose whether to rent or buy the equipment. Medicare will only cover your DME if your doctors and DME suppliers are enrolled in Medicare. Doctors and suppliers have to meet strict standards to enroll and stay enrolled in Medicare. If your doctors or suppliers aren’t enrolled, Medicare won’t pay the claims submitted by them. It’s also important to ask your suppliers if they participate in Medicare before you get DME. If suppliers are participating suppliers, they must accept assignment. If suppliers are enrolled in Medicare but aren’t “participating,” they may choose not to accept assignment. If suppliers don't accept assignment, there’s no limit on the amount they can charge you. Competitive Bidding Program If you live in or visit certain areas, you may be affected by Medicare's Competitive Bidding Program. In most cases, Medicare will only help pay for these equipment and supplies if they're provided by contract suppliers when both of these apply: Contract suppliers can't charge you more than the 20% coinsurance and any unmet yearly deductible for any equipment or supplies included in the Competitive Bidding Program. You may need to use specific suppliers for some types of diabetes testing sup Continue reading >>

What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Having Diabetes? Which Blood Test Is Required To Know If Someone Is Diabetic?

What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Having Diabetes? Which Blood Test Is Required To Know If Someone Is Diabetic?

If you are 40 years old or more, get your blood sugar level checked at least once every year, because you are in age-group that is prone to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, if you notice any one of following symptoms or changes in your body, go for blood sugar test, consult your physician, you may be diabetic. Increased urination/urine volume (polyuria) Increased thirst (polydypsia) Increased hunger (polyphagia) Frequent skin infection Dry mouth (hyposalivation) with or without periodontal problems Rampent dental caries Delayed wound healing Neuritis Burning of tounge Burning while urination Muscle fatigue/unexplained tiredness Blurred vision Early development of cataract (at age of 40-50 years) Hypertryglceridemia/hypercholesterolemia Which blood tests are required? Blood sugar levels (Fasting & Postprandial) Glycosylated hemoglobin Wish you non-diabetic healthy life! Continue reading >>

3 Diabetes Tests You Must Have

3 Diabetes Tests You Must Have

Mike Ellis was fly fishing when he first noticed a change in his vision. Ellis, an avid angler, had so much trouble focusing he struggled for 20 minutes before he was finally able to get a fly on his hook, something he'd done countless times over many years of fly fishing. Then, after casting his line, he was unable to see his lure on the water. "I thought I'd scorched my eyeballs from being out in the sun too much," says Ellis, 63, a retired mechanical engineer in Denver. An eye exam the following month revealed an equally unsettling reality: Ellis had type 2 diabetes, the most common type of the disease. Years of going undiagnosed had taken a toll on his eyesight. He had diabetic retinopathy. The blood vessels in the back of his eye were damaged, a problem that often comes with the condition. "Diabetes damages every blood vessel in your body, including the ones in your eyes," says Robert Rizza, MD, professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic. "Similar damage can also occur in your heart, your head, and your kidneys. But if you take care of yourself -- if you control your blood sugar, blood cholesterol, and blood pressure -- the chances of bad things happening to you are very low." Certainly, that's the case with Ellis. With the help of three basic tests, he has his diabetes in check. These tests can help you, too. A simple blood test, the A1c (your doctor may call it "glycosylated hemoglobin") is done on a sample of blood taken from a finger-stick or from a small vial of it drawn from your arm. Not to be confused with the daily at-home monitoring that allows some people with diabetes to measure their blood sugars in the moment, the A1c test paints a picture of your average blood sugar level for the past 3 months. If you can keep your hemoglobin A1c in the range of about Continue reading >>

Diabetes Test Panel

Diabetes Test Panel

Direct-to-consumer lab testing; No doctor referral or insurance necessary 2,000+ conveniently located CLIA-certified U.S. labs Comprehensive and easy-to-use website About Our Diabetes Test Panel The diabetes test panel includes multiple tests relevant to diagnosing and monitoring diabetes. Diabetes is a group of diseases that result in blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high. Type 1 Diabetes is characterized by the body failing to produce insulin. Type 2 Diabetes is characterized by failing to produce enough insulin for proper function or by the body not reacting to insulin. Approximately 90 percent of diabetes cases are Type 2. Gestational diabetes affects pregnant women. It occurs when their bodies have very high glucose levels and not enough insulin to transport it into cells. Often women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms, so testing is important if you are considered an at-risk patient. Our Diabetes Panel includes the following: Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) / Glycohemoglobin - The Hemoglobin A1c (glycohemoglobin or glycated hemoglobin) test evaluates the average amount of glucose in the blood over the past 8-12 weeks. Random Microalbumin, Urine Test - Healthy kidneys filter waste and toxins from the blood and hang on to the healthy components, including proteins such as albumin. Kidney damage can cause proteins to leak through the kidneys and exit the body via urine. Albumin is one of the first proteins to leak when the kidneys become damaged. Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP); 14 health tests that measure blood sugar (glucose) levels, electrolyte and fluid balance, kidney function, and liver function. Albumin - Albumin is a protein made by the liver. Measuring levels of albumin is helpful in diagnosing liver disease. An albumin test measures how well yo Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Pre-diabetes

Diabetes & Pre-diabetes

Diabetes is disease where the body is unable to produce enough (or any) insulin, does not properly use the insulin that is produced, or a combination of the two. When this occurs, the body becomes unable to process sugar from the blood into the cells, which leads to high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar can lead to serious health problems, including heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. A simple blood test – called the A1C test – can show whether you have type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes, or are at risk for developing the disease in the future. The most common types of diabetes include: Type 1 Diabetes When you have type 1 diabetes, your body makes little to no insulin whatsoever. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease; the cause is not fully understood, but it likely relates to genetics as well as environmental triggers. Type 1 diabetes – formerly known as juvenile diabetes - is usually diagnosed in childhood or adolescence, but can surface at any age. It’s critical for people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes to take insulin every day. Type 2 Diabetes When you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin as efficiently as it should. This condition is the most common type of diabetes and is most prevalent among middle-aged and older adults. Type 2 diabetes can be caused by a number of factors including obesity, poor diet and family history. Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. While most cases of gestational diabetes disappear after giving birth, having gestational diabetes during pregnancy may increase your chances of getting type 2 diabetes in the future. Continue reading >>

What Are The Risks For A Mother And Baby Of Skipping Gestational Diabetes Testing During Pregnancy?

What Are The Risks For A Mother And Baby Of Skipping Gestational Diabetes Testing During Pregnancy?

When you leave your doctor’s office, do you ever wonder what he’s not telling you? Every appointment, he tells you to eat less sugar and go on more walks, but aren’t there other ways to get your diabetes under control? Here’s 3 tricks to manage your diabetes that your doctor won’t tell you: Eat More Fat You read that right. Eat more fat. That’s because fat helps your body absorb insulin. That means the more fat you eat, the easier it’ll be to manage your blood sugar. But here’s the kicker: It’s got to be the right type of fat. You’re looking for Unsaturated Omega-3 Fat. Here’s some great sources: Fish Eggs (Any eggs labeled “enriched” have plenty of omega-3) Grass-fed beef (There’s lots of omega-3 in the grass) Do Some Pushups… Or any kind of strength exercises. All the cardio your doctor tells you to do will increase your insulin absorption a little, but to really keep your body regulated you’ve got to get your entire body moving. The best way to do that is any exercise that focuses on strength. You want to avoid straining yourself, but make a habit of doing a few pushups every day, throw in some body squats, and soon you’ll be taking tighter control of your blood sugar. Not to mention it’ll get rid of stress, and give you plenty of energy. Relax Laying back and keeping cool are vital to regulating your blood sugar. Stress causes physical distress on the body which affects blood glucose levels. Not to mention, when you’re stressed out it’s easy to overeat, which obviously wreaks havoc on your blood sugar. For easy relaxation, try out simple meditation or breathing exercises. These tricks will help, but… If You Want to REVERSE your Type 2 Diabetes and never worry about your blood sugar again, here’s what you need: A recent med Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

According to the latest American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, about 8 million people 18 years and older in the United States have type 2 diabetes and do not know it. Often type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed until symptoms become severe and hospitalization is required. Left untreated, diabetes can cause a number of health complications. That's why it's so important to both know what warning signs to look for and to see a health care provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Symptoms In incidences of prediabetes, there are no symptoms. People may not be aware that they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes because they have no symptoms or because the symptoms are so mild that they go unnoticed for quite some time. However, some individuals do experience warning signs, so it's important to be familiar with them. Prediabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes No symptoms Increased or extreme thirst Increased thirst Increased appetite Increased appetite Increased fatigue Fatigue Increased or frequent urination Increased urination, especially at night Unusual weight loss Weight loss Blurred vision Blurred vision Fruity odor or breath Sores that do not heal In some cases, no symptoms In some cases, no symptoms If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: If your blood glucose levels are in normal range, testing should be done about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes There are three ty Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Lab Test Results

Understanding Your Lab Test Results

Diabetes is a chronic condition that requires an enormous amount of self-care and that can affect many parts of the body. Because of this, people who have diabetes are generally advised to visit their doctors multiple times a year and also to see various specialists (such as endocrinologists, podiatrists, and eye doctors) periodically to screen for potential problems and treat any complications that arise. Along with blood pressure readings and inspection of the feet and eyes, there are a number of laboratory tests recommended by the American Diabetes Association. These tests are used to track blood glucose control, kidney function, cardiovascular health, and other areas of health. Although you certainly can’t and won’t be expected to analyze the lab report when your test results come back, knowing a little bit about what your report says can be a way for you to more fully understand and take charge of your health. If it isn’t already your doctor’s regular practice to give you copies of your lab reports, ask for a copy the next time you have lab tests done. Use the information in this article to learn more about what lab reports show, and discuss your results with your doctor to learn what your results mean with regards to your health. Lab reports All lab reports share certain standard features, regardless of the test(s) they show. A Federal law, the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act, regulates all aspects of clinical laboratory testing. It states exactly what information must be included in your lab test report. Some of the standard features include the following: • Your name and a unique identification number, which may be either your birth date or a medical record number assigned to you by the lab. • The name and address of the lab that tested your bloo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tests

Diabetes Tests

Diabetes is a condition that affects the body’s ability to either produce or use insulin. Insulin helps the body utilize blood sugar for energy. Diabetes results in blood sugar, or blood glucose, that rises to abnormally high levels. Over time, diabetes results in damage to blood vessels and nerves, causing a variety of symptoms, including: difficulty seeing tingling and numbness in the hands and feet increased risk for a heart attack or stroke An early diagnosis means you can start treatment and take steps toward a healthier lifestyle. In its early stages, diabetes may or may not cause many symptoms. You should get tested if you experience any of the early symptoms that do sometimes occur, including: extreme thirst feeling tired all the time feeling very hungry, even after eating blurry vision urinating more often than usual have sores or cuts that won’t heal Some people should be tested for diabetes even if they aren’t experiencing symptoms. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends you undergo diabetes testing if you’re overweight (body mass index greater than 25) and fall into any of the following categories: you’re a high risk ethnicity (African American, Latino, Native American, Pacific Islander, Asian American) you have high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, or heart disease you have a family history of diabetes you have a personal history of abnormal blood sugar levels or signs of insulin resistance you don’t engage in regular physical activity you’re a woman with a history of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or gestational diabetes The ADA also recommends you undergo an initial blood sugar test if you are over the age of 45. This helps you establish a baseline for blood sugar levels. Because your risk for diabetes i Continue reading >>

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