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What Are Diabetes Doctors Called

What Specialists Treat Diabetes?

What Specialists Treat Diabetes?

People with diabetes need to regularly review and revise their strategies for managing their disease, under the guidance of a variety of specialists, including: endocrinologists or diabetologists -- healthcare professionals who specialize in diabetes ophthalmologists for eye examinations podiatrists for routine foot care These professionals will monitor your diabetes and check for complications. Keeping up with regular appointments with a primary care doctor is very important with diabetes, and they can make sure that referrals are made to other specialists as needed. Endocrinologists specialize in endrocrine disorders, such as diabetes, and they can be essential in helping to fine-tune insulin and medication doses. Having yearly eye exams with an opthalmologist is also important to help catch any problems early, and often podiatrists (foot doctors) are also recommended to be seen regularly. Since diabetes is something that is largely patient-managed, getting good education about the disease is something that often gets overlooked. Many insurance plans will cover several hours of education with a diabetes educator each year. This educator is usually a nurse or a dietitian who can make sure the patient knows how and when to take their medications, check blood sugars, plan their diet, and everything else involved with staying healthy. Most primary care doctors can provide a referral to an appropriate educator. Depending on the type and severity of diabetes you have, different doctors or specialists may see you. Initially, many diabetics are seen and cared for by their primary care physician, who may be a family doctor or internal medicine doctor. If your primary care doctor feels that you need to be seen by a specialist for improved control of your diabetes, he or she wil Continue reading >>

Dr. Phil Is Not A Medical Doctor. But He Is Now A Paid Spokesperson For A Diabetes Drug.

Dr. Phil Is Not A Medical Doctor. But He Is Now A Paid Spokesperson For A Diabetes Drug.

Ben Rose/WireImage TV personality Phil McGraw — best known as "Dr. Phil" — will be making the media rounds soon talking about his experiences living with Type 2 diabetes for more than 25 years. But be aware: This isn't an objective and noble effort to raise awareness or destigmatize a condition that millions of Americans face. Instead, Dr. Phil has been hired by the drugmaker AstraZeneca as a paid spokesperson — and this presents all sorts of thorny conflict-of-interest problems. "These campaigns create a blurriness between marketing and public health messages," says Dartmouth physician-researcher Steven Woloshin. "People tend to view them with less skepticism, particularly when there is a trusted celebrity spokesperson." The Dr. Phil case is an example of a common Big Pharma tactic known as "disease awareness." "The idea is that a spokesperson, often beloved celebrities like Kelsey Grammer or Paula Deen, helps shed light on a particular disease. In turn, they build the base of patients who take a drug company's medications. These campaigns usually involve some subtle hawking of a company's pharmaceuticals, often at a time when there's a push within the company to ramp up sales of a particular drug or just before a new drug is coming to market. So they're better thought of as covert drug ads masquerading as friendly advice about a disease from a trusted source. Sponsored campaigns don’t typically present unbiased information AstraZeneca is sponsoring the Dr. Phil campaign. AstraZeneca makes a diabetes medication called Bydureon. Clearly, the drugmaker doesn't have an interest in giving the public objective information about all the different treatments available for diabetes — the kind of information that can help people make evidence-based choices about the h Continue reading >>

Dr. A.i. Moryan Md, Facp. In Denton, Tx

Dr. A.i. Moryan Md, Facp. In Denton, Tx

An early diagnosis and implementation of aggressive treatment services can prolong the potentially devastating consequences of endocrine related diseases including diabetes, thyroid illnesses, obesity and more. Dr. A I Moryan is dedicated to providing quality and services for patients with these and other medical conditions. Dr. Moryan provides a comprehensive evaluation, diagnosis and regimen recommendations as well as ongoing access to diabetes education such as insulin pump therapy and continuous glucose monitoring. Dr. Moryan's comprehensive care is based on prevention, education and utilizing modern medical techniques to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Diabetes mellitus is a disease that prevents your body from properly using the energy from the food you eat. Diabetes occurs when either the pancreas (an organ behind your stomach) produces little insulin or no insulin at all. (Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreas that helps the body use sugar for energy.) The pancreas makes insulin, but the insulin made does not work as it should. This condition is called insulin resistance. Type 1 diabetes occurs because the insulin-producing cells (called beta cells) of the pancreas are damaged. People with Type 1 diabetes produce little or no insulin, so sugar cannot get into the body's cells for use as energy. This causes blood sugar levels to rise. People with Type 1 diabetes MUST use insulin injections to control their blood sugar. The damage to the insulin-producing cells in Type 1 diabetes occurs over a period of years. However, the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes might occur over a period of days to weeks. Type 1 is the most common form of diabetes in people younger than 20 years old, but it can occur at any age. People with Type 2 d Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Overview Diabetes mellitus is a condition in which patients have high blood sugar. It is a common condition and affects 8.6% of the population in Singapore. This is an increase from 4.7% in 1984. It is an important condition because there are many complications that can occur as a result of diabetes mellitus. These can be divided broadly into those that occur in the short term (the acute complications) and those that occur over a long time (the chronic complications). Before we go into details of these complications, there is one very important message that we must get across to you as patients and members of the public. These complications are preventable. Although this is not true in every case, well controlled diabetes mellitus through your own efforts and working with your doctor and other health workers, will at least delay the onset of these complications. Patients with diabetes mellitus can live healthy, active, rewarding lives. Types of Diabetes Mellitus There are 2 major types of diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes mellitus has also been known as juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus or insulin dependant diabetes mellitus. This is the less common type and usually occurs in young persons below the age of 35. In this condition, the body is unable to produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a gland that is in the abdomen. Insulin is a hormone that controls the use of different fuels for energy. It is especially important because it allows the body to use glucose (simple sugar) instead of fats. When there is no insulin, the body cannot use or store the glucose that comes from food and this causes the blood sugars to become very high. Instead, the body uses fat as a source of fuel giving rise to some of the acute complications of diabetes mellitus. Continue reading >>

What Is An Endocrinologist?

What Is An Endocrinologist?

Diabetes is a complex disease, and there is a lot more to treating it than just keeping your blood sugar at a healthy level. Thankfully, today many individuals with diabetes have a whole team of skilled professionals to help them manage their illness, including a primary care physician, dietitian, eye doctor, podiatrist, dentist and even a fitness trainer all dedicated to keeping you healthy. According to information from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), it is also important to have an endocrinologist, a doctor who has special training in treating people with diabetes and hormonal disorders, on your care team as well. An endocrinologist is a specially trained doctor who can diagnose and treat diseases that affect your glands, hormones and your endocrine system. The pancreas is part of the endocrine system, and insulin is one of the central hormones the body needs to function properly. Endocrinologists often treat people with diabetes, thyroid disease, metabolic disorders and more. Like other physicians and medical doctors, an endocrinologist is required to finish four years in medical school and complete a three or four year residency. Then, endocrinologists are required to spend two or three more years learning how to diagnose and treat hormone conditions. Overall, an endocrinologist's training typically takes more than 10 years, according to data from The Hormone Foundation. In most cases, your primary care doctor refers you to an endocrinologist if he or she believes you need to see a specialist to help you manage your diabetes. Why see an endocrinologist? Though many people can successfully control their diabetes with their general practitioner's help, there are several cases in which it might be best to see an endocrinologist. The ADA asserts that most peop Continue reading >>

Fraudsters Target People With Diabetes

Fraudsters Target People With Diabetes

Patients with diabetes are being targeted in the latest Medicare scam—one that’s especially worrisome because the fraudsters appear legitimate since they actually know the name and address of doctors who treat their intended victims. “We have no idea how they have this information,” says Tamra Simpson, program director of the Senior Medicare Patrol at the Indiana Association of Area Agencies on Aging (IAAAA). “But in each call we know about, the caller knows the name of the [recipient’s] doctor—and they usually cite the [doctor’s office] address.” Such information could come from stolen medical records or from records of patient conditions kept by pharmaceutical companies and other medical product suppliers—records that have been accessed by scammers. The bait behind these calls is nothing new—an alleged offer for free medical supplies, which in this case is a promise of diabetes testing equipment and other medical goods. And the hook is the same: to get the beneficiaries’ Medicare number, which, of course, is that person’s Social Security number. In the past two weeks, at least eight residents from across Indiana—all with diabetes—reported to the IAAAA that they had received phone calls asking for their Medicare numbers. Complaints of similar calls have been reported from every area code in Indiana. At least one Californian also received a similar phone call. In each case, Simpson notes, the caller specifically asks these Medicare beneficiaries if they have diabetes. In some cases, the callers—who also already know the recipient’s name, address and phone number—also request the maiden name of the patient’s mother, allegedly to “verify” their identities. So far, the phony calls have originated from Florida, but as of Thursday th Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your health care team helps you manage your diabetes and maintain your good health. According to the American Diabetes Association, your diabetes care team should include: You: You are the most important member of your diabetes care team! Only you know how you feel. Your diabetes care team will depend on you to talk to them honestly and supply information about your body. Monitoring your blood sugar tells your doctors whether your current treatment is controlling your diabetes well. By checking your blood sugar levels, you can also prevent or reduce the episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) you have. Primary doctor: Your primary care doctor is who you see for general checkups and when you get sick. This person is usually an internist or family medicine doctor who has experience treating people with diabetes, too. Because your primary care doctor is your main source of care, he or she will most likely head up your diabetes care team. Endocrinologist: An endocrinologist is a doctor who has special training and experience in treating people with diabetes. You should see yours regularly. Dietitian: A registered dietitian (RD) is trained in the field of nutrition. Food is a key part of your diabetes treatment, so yours will help you figure out your food needs based on your weight, lifestyle, medication, and other health goals (like lowering blood fat levels or blood pressure). Nurse educator: A diabetes educator or diabetes nurse practitioner is a registered nurse (RN) with special training and background in caring for and teaching people with diabetes. Nurse educators often help you with the day-to-day aspects of living with diabetes. Eye doctor: Either an ophthalmologist (a doctor who can treat eye problems both medically and surgically) or an optometrist (someone who Continue reading >>

Do You Know The 5 Types Of Diabetes?

Do You Know The 5 Types Of Diabetes?

(BlackDoctor.org) — What is diabetes? Essentially, it’s a disorder where your body has problems producing or effectively using insulin, which can, in turn, cause many other mild to severe health problems. There are several different causes of insulin problems – managing your diabetes will depend on which type you have. Type 1 Diabetes: Little To No Insulin With type 1 diabetes, which used to be called juvenile diabetes, your body does not produce insulin or produces very little. Type 1 diabetes is known as an autoimmune disease because it occurs when your immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in children and young adults and accounts for 5 to 10 percent of diabetes cases in the United States. Symptoms may include thirst, frequent urination, increased hunger, unexplained weight loss, blurry vision, and fatigue. People who have type 1 diabetes need to take insulin injections daily to make up for what their pancreas can’t produce. Type 2 Diabetes: Insulin Resistance Type 2 diabetes, which used to be called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of diabetes cases. While most people who develop type 2 diabetes are older, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in children is on the rise. The exact cause of type 2 diabetes is largely unknown, but the disease tends to develop in people who are obese and physically inactive. People who have a family history of diabetes or a personal history of gestational diabetes are also at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In addition, certain groups, particularly African Americans, have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes usually develop gradually, and are similar to Continue reading >>

History Of Diabetes

History Of Diabetes

Frederick Banting (right) joined by Charles Best in office, 1924 Diabetes is one of the first diseases described[1] with an Egyptian manuscript from c. 1500 BCE mentioning “too great emptying of the urine.”[2] The first described cases are believed to be of type 1 diabetes.[2] Indian physicians around the same time identified the disease and classified it as madhumeha or honey urine noting that the urine would attract ants.[2] The term "diabetes" or "to pass through" was first used in 250 BC by the Greek Apollonius of Memphis.[2] Type 1 and type 2 diabetes were identified as separate conditions for the first time by the Indian physicians Sushruta and Charaka in 400-500 CE with type 1 associated with youth and type 2 with obesity.[2] The term "mellitus" or "from honey" was added by Thomas Willis in the late 1600s to separate the condition from diabetes insipidus which is also associated with frequent urination.[2] Further history[edit] Plaque in Strasbourg commemorating the 1889 discovery by Minkowski and Von Mering The first complete clinical description of diabetes was given by the Ancient Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia (fl. 1st century CE), who also noted the excessive amount of urine which passed through the kidneys.”[3] Diabetes mellitus appears to have been a death sentence in the ancient era. Hippocrates makes no mention of it, which may indicate that he felt the disease was incurable. Aretaeus did attempt to treat it but could not give a good prognosis; he commented that "life (with diabetes) is short, disgusting and painful."[4] The disease must have been rare during the time of the Roman empire with Galen commenting that he had only seen two cases during his career.[2] In medieval Persia, Avicenna (980–1037) provided a detailed account on diabet Continue reading >>

What Is An Endocrinologist?

What Is An Endocrinologist?

Endocrinology is a complex study of the various hormones and their actions and disorders in the body. Glands are organs that make hormones. These are substances that help to control activities in the body and have several effects on the metabolism, reproduction, food absorption and utilization, growth and development etc. Hormones also control the way an organism responds to their surroundings and help by providing adequate energy for various functions. The glands that make up the endocrine system include the pineal, hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, thymus, adrenals, pancreas, ovaries and testes. Who is an endocrinologist? An endocrinologist is a specially trained doctor who has a basic training in Internal Medicine as well. Some disorders like low thyroid hormone production or hypothyroidism deals only with an endocrine organ and an endocrinologist alone may detect, diagnose and manage such patients. Yet other disorders may have endocrine as well and other origins like infertility and may need a deeper understanding of medicine on the part of the endocrinologist to identify and work in collaboration with another specialist (a gynaecologist in cases of infertility). What do endocrinologists do? Endocrinologists have the training to diagnose and treat hormone imbalances and problems by helping to restore the normal balance of hormones in the body. The common diseases and disorders of the endocrine system that endocrinologists deal with include diabetes mellitus and thyroid disorders. Diabetes mellitus This is one of the most common conditions seen by endocrinologists. This results due to inadequate insulin hormone secreted by the pancreas leading to excess blood sugar that damages various organs. Endocrinologists treat diabetes with diet and blood sugar red Continue reading >>

> Diabetes: When To Call The Doctor

> Diabetes: When To Call The Doctor

Taking care of your diabetes includes knowing when to call a doctor and get medical help. As you learn more about diabetes, you'll become more confident about knowing when to call for help. Even if you're managing your diabetes on your own, it's a good idea to tell your mom or dad when you're feeling sick or having any symptoms that might be related to your diabetes. Having this parental support can be a huge help. Your mom or dad can help you get in touch with your doctor to prevent things from getting serious or even take you to the emergency department if you need it. If you're having a problem, start by checking your diabetes management plan. The plan can give you ideas on when and where to call for help. For many medical problems, it's best to start by calling your primary doctor, like your pediatrician or family doctor. In some cases, though, your diabetes management plan might advise you to call someone else on your diabetes health care team. What Should I Tell the Health Care Team? If you need to see a doctor or get medical care, health care professionals may ask about: your symptoms, like whether you've been throwing up or feeling more tired than usual your blood glucose levels your temperature any prescription medications you're taking and the phone number of your pharmacy any foods and drinks you've had whether you've had any drugs or alcohol If you have time, it can help to write down this info before you visit the doctor. If you're ill, especially if the illness causes fever, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea, or if your ability to eat or drink has been affected, call your doctor. You should also let your doctor or diabetes health care team know if you: have had a significant injury (more than a minor cut, scrape, or bump) are going to be having surgery have be Continue reading >>

Doctors Admit That Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed!

Doctors Admit That Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed!

List of Doctors: Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed! Dr. Mehmet Oz: Diabetes Is Treatable and Reversible Dr. Neal Barnard Tells Dr. Oz on Oprah Winfrey Show: Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed With Diet Dr. Gabriel Cousens: You Can Reverse Diabetes With Raw Food Dr. Joel Fuhrman: Heart Disease and Diabetes Are Easy to Reverse Dr. Mark Hyman: Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible Next Steps: Start Reversing Your Diabetes Today Author's Perspective: Although there is no medically-approved cure for Type 2 diabetes, there is a lot of evidence that indicates that you can definitely control the disease and prevent the development of the complications such as amputation, kidney failure, and blindness. In addition, there is evidence that you can reverse the cellular and tissue damage caused by the diabetes and its complications -- as long as your body obtains the key nutrients to facilitate the healing and repair processes. Unfortunately, healthcare professionals including doctors, nurses, diabetes educators, and others receive their formal education from various universities and colleges. During their education process, they are taught how to treat most diseases with various drugs. Interestingly, many of the universities and colleges receive funding from the pharmaceutical industry, giving this industry the "right" and the power to dictate course curriculum! Of course, no one is going to admit this, but, think about it: With all of these smart and educated people, not one single doctor or healthcare professional believes that there is or could be a cure for a disease such as Type 2 diabetes? Really? The above was the perspective of most medical experts concerning Type 2 diabetes several years ago. But, slowly and gradually, their thinking has begun to change! Doctors are good people -- they Continue reading >>

Which Diabetes Doctor Are You Forgetting To See?

Which Diabetes Doctor Are You Forgetting To See?

Jochen Sands/Thinkstock High blood sugar problems don’t just boost the numbers on your meter. They reach into every cell of your body—shutting down nerves, hampering blood flow, and amping up blood pressure. Along the way, these disturbances increase your odds for everything from muffled hearing and heart attacks to blurry eyesight and big-time foot problems. The solution? Well-managed blood sugar, plus a health-care team with plenty of well-trained specialists. You’re probably already seeing your family doctor, internist, or endocrinologist. And we hope you’re taking advantage of insurance for a certified diabetes educator and/or registered dietitian for healthy living and food advice. But to truly take care of yourself, consider adding some (or all) of these experts. The payoffs include a brighter smile, sharper vision, a happier outlook—and a lower risk for major diabetes complications like heart attacks, strokes, and even amputation. 1. Audiologist John Turner/Getty Images Deep in your inner ear, diabetes can damage nerves and tiny blood vessels. This can slowly muffle your ability to hear the world around you, especially high-frequency sounds like women’s and children’s voices. In a recent National Institutes of Health study, people with diabetes were twice as likely to have hearing loss as those without blood sugar problems. A hearing check can’t reverse damage, but it can boost your motivation to keep your blood sugar controlled to slow future damage, and can help you take the steps to hear clearly again, says audiologist Debbie Abel, AuD, a senior education specialist with the American Academy of Audiology. Signs of trouble that merit a check? “Turning the TV up, not hearing the turn signal in your car or your telephone ringing, and not underst Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

What is Diabetes Mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder of carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism characterized by fasting elevations of blood sugar (glucose) levels and a greatly increased risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, retinopathy, and loss of nerve function. Diabetes can occur when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or if the cells of the body become resistant to insulin. Hence, the blood sugar cannot get into the cells, which then leads to serious complications. Diabetes is divided into two major categories: Type 1 and Type 2. About ten percent of all diabetics are Type 1 and about 90% are Type 2. Type 1 is associated with complete destruction of the beta-cells of the pancreas, which manufacture the hormone insulin. Type 1 patients require lifelong insulin for the control of blood sugar levels. Type 1 results from injury to the insulin-producing beta-cells, coupled with some defect in tissue regeneration capacity. In Type 1, the body’s immune system begins to attack the pancreas. Antibodies for beta-cells are present in seventy-five percent of all cases of Type 1, compared to one-half percent to two percent of non-diabetics. It is probable that the antibodies to the beta-cells develop in response to cell damage due to other mechanisms (chemical, free-radical, viral, food allergy, etc.). It appears that normal individuals either do not develop as severe an antibody reaction, or are better able to repair the damage once it occurs. Type 2 historically has had an onset after 40 years of age in overweight individuals but is today even seen in children due to the obesity epidemic present in all age groups in America as well as those exposed to high levels of POPs (persistent organic pollutants). Initially, insulin levels are typic Continue reading >>

Questions For Your Doctor

Questions For Your Doctor

Ensuring Good Care You’ve just been diagnosed with diabetes and you want to take proper care of yourself. After all, you know that if you control your blood glucose levels, you’ll feel better and lessen your chances of developing complications. But there are two problems. The first is that you don’t know enough about diabetes to ask the right questions. And the second? There’s a chance your doctor doesn’t know a lot about diabetes, either. On the other hand, it’s possible that your doctor didn’t explain much when you were diagnosed because he knew that all you would hear that day was the word “diabetes,” and wanted to give you some time to let the diagnosis sink in. Short of completing a fellowship in endocrinology, how can you tell if your doctor knows enough about diabetes to give you the proper care? It’s simple: Interview your current or potential doctor. Although taking care of your diabetes day-to-day will be primarily a do-it-yourself project, you’ll need the proper knowledge and tools before you can manage the condition, and that calls for a team of experts to guide you along the road to maintaining good health. Dr. Rhoda Cobin suggests beginning the interview with your doctor or prospective doctor with the open-ended question, “What’s going on in my body?” Cobin, who is a past president of the American College of Endocrinologists, Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, and practices endocrinology in Ridgewood, New Jersey, says that that is the most important question you can ask. That one question, Cobin says, can open up a dialogue between you and the doctor. It’s a chance for the doctor to tell you about diabetes: how it begins, how it can affect the rest of your body, what needs to Continue reading >>

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