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What Antibiotics Can Diabetics Take

People With Diabetes Should Avoid Antibiotic Gatifloxacin

People With Diabetes Should Avoid Antibiotic Gatifloxacin

Reason for posting: Gatifloxacin (Tequin) is commonly used to treat respiratory infections, including community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, sinusitis and urinary tract infections Health Canada has previously warned health care providers about cases of clinically significant hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in patients taking the drug, usually those with diabetes.1 A recent case– control study confirmed the dysglycemic effects of the drug in patients with and without diabetes, and quantified its risks compared with other antibiotics.2 Health Canada has advised that the drug not be prescribed to patients with diabetes.3 The drug: Gatifloxacin is a third-generation, broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone with activity against gram-negative and gram-positive aerobic, anaerobic and atypical microorganisms. It undergoes minimal biotransformation and is excreted renally. The recent case–control database study identified Ontario patients over 65 years of age seen in hospitals after they experienced either hypo-or hyperglycemia who had received an outpatient prescription for an oral fluoroquinolone, a second-generation cephalosporin or a macrolide during the preceding month.2 Because dysglycemia can result from infections or be caused by a hospital stay in itself, patients who had been taking macrolides (which are used for similar indications but which do not affect glycemic control) were chosen to form the control group. Each case of dysglycemia was matched (by the patient's age, sex, presence or absence of diabetes, and timing of the adverse event with respect to the initiation of the antibiotics) with up to 5 controls. Patients who experienced hypoglycemia were in excess of 4 times as likely to have been treated with gatifloxicin rather than a mac Continue reading >>

Could Antibiotics Give You Diabetes?

Could Antibiotics Give You Diabetes?

Antibiotics can cure. They kill infectious bacteria and save lives. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease. It shortens lives. Now there is disturbing evidence that the cure may be contributing to the disease—in other words, certain antibiotics may increase the risk of developing diabetes. The connection is the ecosystem of bacteria in our gut that scientists call the microbiome. It affects digestion and immunity, and an unhealthy microbiome has been linked to diseases as diverse as obesity, certain cancers, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and…diabetes. Several studies have shown that type 2 diabetes, the kind that affects most people, is more common in people who have microbiomes with altered or low bacteria diversity. What we eat and drink changes the composition of the bacteria, and so can the medication we take…especially antibiotics. Penicillin, the original wonder drug, saved soldiers from battlefield infections in World War II and later revolutionized medicine by curing once fatal infections. But antibiotics by their very nature disturb the microbiome by killing bacteria…including beneficial bacteria in the gut. Now, the newest research finds an association between the repeated use of certain antibiotics and the diabetes epidemic that affects 30 million Americans…and counting. A STRONG ASSOCIATION IN A MILLION PEOPLE In the latest study, researchers had access to nearly complete medical records of almost 10 million people living in the United Kingdom. The records included medical diagnoses, tests and procedures, prescription medications and lifestyle factors, including smoking and drinking history. The research team identified 208,002 people who were diagnosed with diabetes (either type 1 or 2). Each case was matched with four controls… Continue reading >>

Antibiotics And Diabetes: Do The Two Mix?

Antibiotics And Diabetes: Do The Two Mix?

Antibiotics and Diabetes: Do the Two Mix? Chances are, at some point in your life youve taken a course of antibiotics. Maybe you took penicillin as a child for strep throat. Or perhaps youve been given azithromycin (brand names Zithromax, Z-Pak, and others) for a sinus or upper respiratory infection. No doubt, antibiotics are lifesavers in most instances. You might have wondered how antibiotics affect your diabetes control, if at all. And even if youve never given it a thought, there are a few pointers to keep in mind when it comes to using antibiotics. Antibiotics are medicines that fight infections caused by bacteria. They kill bacteria or keep them from reproducing. Antibiotics are powerful drugs that, when used properly, can save lives. (Unfortunately, antibiotics are often used improperly, and thats creating a serious set of problems, which Ill get to in a moment.) Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin in 1928 (a good piece of trivia to remember), and now there are several antibiotics that are related to penicillin, including ampicillin, amoxicillin, and benzylpencillin. These drugs are used to treat a variety of infections, such as chest infections, urinary tract infections (UTIs) , and skin infections. There are also more modern antibiotics available, such as: Cephalosporins: used to treat UTIs, ear and skin infections, respiratory infections, bacterial meningitis, and sepsis. These include cephalexin (Keflex). Macrolides: used to treat lung and chest infections, and are also used in case of a penicillin allergy or penicillin resistance. These include erythromycin (E-Mycin), clarithromycin (Biaxin), and azithromycin (Zitromax, Z-pak, and others). Tetracyclines: often used to treat acne and rosacea. These include tetracycline (Sumycin, Panmycin) and doxycycline Continue reading >>

Taking Penicillin And Other Antibiotics May Increase Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Taking Penicillin And Other Antibiotics May Increase Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Taking Penicillin And Other Antibiotics May Increase Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk Over the past few decades, rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes have reached epidemic proportions in many nations. Now a new study from the University of Pennsylvania uncovers a link between diabetes and changes in gut bacteria triggered by medicine use. Specifically, the researchers found people treated with two to five courses of certain antibiotic groups had an increased risk of developing diabetes. Our digestive system harbors nearly 100 trillion bacteria, which are referred to as the gut microbiome. These bacteria, which collectively weigh up to 4 and a quarter pounds, help break down the food we eat, produce vitamins and hormones, and even work as part of our immune defense. Many scientists would go so far as to say these gut microbes function as a separate organ, equal to the liver, say, or the kidney. Even more strangely, the bacteria residing in our guts contain 3.3 million genes a hundred times the number of our human genes. It's as if we contain a separate bacterial self and this other self is as individual as we are. In fact, the singular composition and diversity of the gut bacteria that live inside each of us affect our metabolism, our immunity, and ultimately our health. Penicillin, Cephalosporins, Macrolides, Quinolones Antibiotic therapy can alter the microbiota and is commonly used in Western countries, wrote the authors in their published study. We sought to evaluate whether past antibiotic exposure increases diabetes risk. To understand whether the changes in our gut bacteria resulting from the medicines we use might be linked to diabetes, the researchers searched through a large database from the United Kingdom. They looked for anyone diagnosed with diabetes and then fou Continue reading >>

Antibiotics Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Antibiotics Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk

THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Taking antibiotics might increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes , new research suggests. Danish researchers found that people with type 2 diabetes tended to take more antibiotics in the years leading up to their diagnosis than Danes without the condition. "Patients with type 2 diabetes are overexposed to antibiotics compared with matched control persons without diabetes ," said study researcher Dr. Kristian Hallundbaek Mikkelsen, a medical-doctoral student at the Center for Diabetes Research at Gentofte Hospital and the University of Copenhagen. "The overexposure is seen after, as well as 15 years, before the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes ," Mikkelsen said. Although the researchers uncovered an association between antibiotic use and type 2 diabetes , it's important to note they did not establish a direct cause-and-effect relationship. For the study, the scientists tallied antibiotic prescriptions filled by more than 170,000 Danes with type 2 diabetes and about 1.3 million other adults between 1995 and 2012. The men and women were identified using records from national health registries. Individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes filled an average of 0.8 antibiotic prescriptions annually, compared to 0.5 a year among those who didn't develop diabetes. The more prescriptions, the more likely those people were to have type 2 diabetes, the researchers found. People with type 2 diabetes don't make enough of the hormone insulin , or the insulin doesn't work well to clear sugar from the blood. About 29 million Americans have type 2 diabetes, which increases the risk of heart disease and other problems. The study was published online Aug. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Endocriniology & Metabolism. Those who took an antibiotic, Continue reading >>

Antibiotics And Metformin

Antibiotics And Metformin

I've been on amoxicilian 875, 3 x day for about 5 days. I also take Metformin 850, 3 x a day. I have never had problem with stomach upset with the metformin. All of a sudden every morning it is like WW III. The amoxicilian is also making me dizzy and spacey especially in the morning. I am trying to space out the doses so I'm not taking the 2 at the same time. But since you are supposed to take both with food it is difficult. I normally eat a lot of fiber ( nuts, flaxseed, raw veggies) and have had to stop that. So what do I eat that will be gentle on my stomach and not drive my bgs way high. Morning bgs are coming down about 10 points a day but are still 30 points higher than usual and don't usually come down until about 2 pm. I hate being sick. I would say call the pharmacist for some suggestions on what to eat when you take medication, but I'm afraid he/she would tell you to eat some crackers or bread, still, I think it's worth a try to call and ask and if you get that response ask if there's anything else you could try. You might want to consider switching to metformin extended release, even if it's just temporary, to ease up on the stomach upsets. Moderator T2 dx'd 2009, low carb diet, Metformin, Januvia. Eggs are easy on the tummy. Try soft-boiled. I know it says to take with food but I take my met without food and I have never had a tummy problem from doing that. I also take my antibiotics without food--but ya gotta watch because some work better with food. I've just found that for me, without food is better. D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 I've been on amoxicilian 875, 3 x day for about 5 days. I also take Metformin 850, 3 x a day. I have never had problem with stomach upset with the metformin. All of a sudden every morning it is like WW III. Th Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Antibiotics And Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Antibiotics And Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Use of Antibiotics and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-Based Case-Control Study, by Mikkelsen and Associates. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, published ahead of print August 27, 2015, doi: 10.1210/jc.2015-2696 What is the problem and what is known about it so far? Studies have shown that people with a lot of different bacteria in their gut get type 2 diabetes less often than people with fewer different bacteria in their gut. Why did the researchers do this particular study? Researchers wanted to know how taking antibiotics, which kill bacteria in the body, affects the chances of getting type 2 diabetes. The researchers reviewed information collected from Danish citizens over 13 years. Denmark has a nation-wide health care system with detailed records of prescription drug use. They looked at information from 170,504 people who had type 2 diabetes and tracked their prescriptions for antibiotics. Then they found other Danish citizens who were the same age and sex who did not have diabetes and compared the use of antibiotics between the two groups. Compared with having filled no prescription for antibiotics, those who filled two to four prescriptions had a 23% higher risk for type 2 diabetes, and those who filled five or more had a 53% higher risk. The study was not able to tell if the antibiotics actually caused people to get type 2 diabetes who otherwise would not have gotten it. It is possible that people who have type 2 diabetes get more infections and are simply prescribed antibiotics more often. This study suggests that the more antibiotics people take the higher their risk is for getting type 2 diabetes. Researchers believe that having less bacteria in the gut overall may affect the bodys ability to process the sugars in food, called glucos Continue reading >>

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

THURSDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to have severe blood sugar fluctuations than those who take other types of the drugs, a new study finds. The increased risk was low but doctors should consider it when prescribing the class of antibiotics, known as fluoroquinolones, to people with diabetes, the researchers said. This class of antibiotics, which includes drugs such as Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin) and Avelox (moxifloxacin), is commonly used to treat conditions such as urinary tract infections and community-acquired pneumonia. One expert said the study should serve as a wake-up call for doctors. "Given a number of alternatives, physicians may consider prescribing alternate antibiotics ... in the place of fluoroquinolones (particularly moxifloxacin) to patients with diabetes," said Dr. Christopher Ochner, assistant professor of pediatrics and adolescent medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. "In general, this study demonstrates that closer attention needs to be paid to particular drug-condition interactions." The study included about 78,000 people with diabetes in Taiwan. The researchers looked at the patients' use of three classes of antibiotics: fluoroquinolones; second-generation cephalosporins (cefuroxime, cefaclor, or cefprozil); or macrolides (clarithromycin or azithromycin). The investigators also looked for any emergency-room visits or hospitalizations for severe blood sugar swings among the patients in the 30 days after they started taking the antibiotics. The results showed that patients who took fluoroquinolones were more likely to have severe blood sugar swings than those who took antibiotics in the other classes. The level of risk Continue reading >>

Antibiotic Use Tied To Diabetes Risk

Antibiotic Use Tied To Diabetes Risk

Well | Antibiotic Use Tied to Diabetes Risk Danish researchers have found an association between the use of antibiotics and the development of Type 2 diabetes. In 2012, the researchers identified 170,504 cases of Type 2 diabetes and matched them with 1,364,008 controls without diabetes. Then they used Danish government databases to check the participants antibiotic use over the previous 13 years. Compared with having filled no prescription for antibiotics, those who filled two to four prescriptions had a 23 percent higher risk for diabetes, and those who filled five or more had a 53 percent higher risk. The study, in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism , acknowledges that reverse causation is a possibility in other words, people who have diabetes or are at risk of developing the disease may take more antibiotics than others. Still, the risk was apparent up to 15 years before a diabetes diagnosis, which argues against this reverse causation. The scientists suggest that antibiotics may disrupt the gut biota, causing changes in insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, which can lead to diabetes. In animal studies, antibiotic treatment has been shown to affect glucose and insulin metabolism, said the lead author, Dr. Kristian Hallundbaek Mikkelsen of the Center for Diabetes Research at Gentofte Hospital in Copenhagen. What we see in animals may be happening in people, and if so, then there are more good reasons to be strict about antibiotic prescription policy. For more fitness, food and wellness news, follow us on Facebook and Twitter , or sign up for our newsletter. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Infectionsmedication

Diabetic Foot Infectionsmedication

Author: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD; Chief Editor: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP more... For specific information concerning the evaluation and management of diabetic foot infections, including choices of antimicrobial agents, the reader is referred to authoritative guidelines published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. [ 14 ] Patients with mild infections can be treated in outpatient settings with oral antibiotics that cover skin flora including streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus. Agents such as cephalexin, dicloxacillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, or clindamycin are effective choices. If methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) infection is suspected, then clindamycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, minocycline, or linezolid may be used. If gram-negative aerobes and/or anaerobes are suspected, dual drug treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole plus amoxicillin-clavulanate or clindamycin plus a fluoroquinolone such as levofloxacin or moxifloxacin may be used. For moderate-to-severe infections, patients should be hospitalized for parenteral antibiotic therapy. Empiric choices should cover streptococci, MRSA, aerobic gram-negative bacilli, and anaerobes. MRSA is covered by vancomycin, linezolid, or daptomycin. Acceptable choices for gram-negative aerobic organisms and anaerobes include ampicillin-sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, meropenem, or ertapenem. Alternatively, ceftriaxone, cefepime, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, or aztreonam plus metronidazole would be sufficient to cover aerobic gram-negative and anaerobic organisms. Tigecycline has been studied, but published experience is limited. Duration of therapy should be individualized. For those treated in outpatient settings with oral antibiotics, duration of treatment is usually 7-14 days. In those tr Continue reading >>

Amoxicillin & Insulin

Amoxicillin & Insulin

Amoxicillin is an antibiotic used to treat various types of infection. If you are taking insulin for diabetes or other diseases, taking amoxicillin might give you cause for concern. In most cases, amoxicillin does not interact with insulin, although the infection it is treating might cause changes in your blood sugar levels. Consult your doctor if you have any concerns about taking amoxicillin. Video of the Day The drug amoxicillin is a penicillin antibiotic primarily used to treat infections caused by bacteria, such as bladder infections or pneumonia. Amoxicillin does not treat viral infections. According to consumer website Drugs.com, amoxicillin can cause issues if you have asthma, liver disease, kidney disease or mononucleosis. It is not known to cause issues with insulin or in those with diabetes. However, you should not take amoxicillin if you are allergic to penicillin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. The primary function of insulin is to control the level of glucose, or blood sugar, in the body. When you consume foods in the form of basic sugars or carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into glucose, which it then absorbs into your bloodstream. If the level of glucose in your blood gets too high, your pancreas secretes insulin, which then prompts cells in your fat tissues, liver and muscle tissues to take up glucose and store it in the form of glycogen for later use. In those with diabetes and other insulin-related diseases, the ability of the body to secrete or take up insulin is impaired, leading to potentially harmful levels of blood glucose. Taking amoxicillin does not directly interfere with the level of insulin in your body, according to Dr. Sheetal Kaul of the Ask Doctor Free website. However, the infection you are treating with the amox Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

Medications To Avoid When Taking Insulin

Medications To Avoid When Taking Insulin

At last count, there are more than 700 medications that potentially interact with insulin with varying degrees of significance. Typically a negative drug interaction either decreases or increases insulin's effects, posing the risk of high or low blood glucose. But rather than insisting that you avoid these medications, it's more likely your doctor will want to adjust your insulin dosage for the period you take them. Commonly prescribed drugs for chronic conditions that may require an adjustment in insulin dosage include: Prednisone Olanzapine thyroid hormones ACE inhibitors selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) sulfonamides disopyramide quinine and quinidine In addition, some drugs that are prescribed for temporary conditions, such as antibiotics for infection, may require an adjustment to your insulin dosage. It's best to check drug interaction information with your pharmacist or physician, and to double-check with your pharmacist each time you refill a prescription of insulin. By Joyce A. Generali, M.S. FASHP, R.Ph., director of the University of Kansas Drug Information Center and the author of The Pharmacy Technician’s Pocket Drug Reference From our sister publication, Diabetes Focus, Summer 2011 Publication Review By: the Editorial Staff at HealthCommunities.com Last Modified: 11 Sep 2015 Continue reading >>

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